1986 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA–OFC play-off)

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1986 FIFA World Cup qualification
(UEFAOFC play-off)
Event 1986 FIFA World Cup qualification
Scotland won 2–0 on aggregate
First leg
Date20 November 1985
Venue Hampden Park, Glasgow
Referee Vojtěch Christov (Czechoslovakia)
Attendance61,920
Second leg
Date4 December 1985
Venue Olympic Park, Melbourne
RefereeJosé Roberto Ramiz Wright (Brazil)
Attendance32,000
1978
1990

The 1986 FIFA World Cup UEFAOFC qualification play-off was a two-legged home-and-away tie between the winners of the Oceania qualifying tournament, Australia, and the second-placed team from the UEFA Group 7, Scotland. The games were played on 20 November and 4 December 1985 in Glasgow and Melbourne respectively. Australia were hoping to play in the FIFA World Cup for the first time since 1974 and Scotland were hoping for a fourth successive FIFA World Cup. [1] [2]

1986 FIFA World Cup 1986 edition of the FIFA World Cup

The 1986 FIFA World Cup, the 13th FIFA World Cup, was held in Mexico from 31 May to 29 June 1986. The tournament was the second to feature a 24-team format. With European nations not allowed to host after the previous World Cup in Spain, Colombia had been originally chosen to host the competition by FIFA but, largely due to economic reasons, was not able to do so and officially resigned in 1982. Mexico was selected as the new host in May 1983, thus becoming the first country to host the World Cup more than once. This was the third FIFA World Cup tournament in succession that was hosted by a Spanish-speaking country, after Argentina 1978, and Spain 1982.

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

Oceania Football Confederation body for association football in Oceania

The Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) is one of the six continental confederations of international association football, consisting of New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, and other Pacific Island countries. It promotes the game in Oceania and allows the member nations to qualify for the FIFA World Cup.

Contents

Background

Scotland had qualified for the play-off by finishing second in their UEFA group, behind Spain. Scotland secured second place in dramatic circumstances with a 1–1 draw against Wales at Ninian Park, Cardiff. Davie Cooper scored a late equalising goal with a penalty kick to give Scotland the point they needed, but manager Jock Stein collapsed and died of a heart attack. This meant that assistant manager Alex Ferguson took charge of the team for the play-off.

Spain national football team National association football team representing Spain

The Spain national football team represents Spain in international men's association football since 1920, and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain.

On 10 September 1985, the Welsh and Scottish national teams played each other during the qualifying stages of the 1986 FIFA World Cup at Ninian Park, the home of Cardiff City. The game was both teams' final match of the qualifying tournament, and both were still able to gain a place at the finals in Mexico; Wales needed to win the game, while Scotland knew that a draw would be enough.

Wales national football team mens association football team representing Wales

The Wales national football team represents Wales in international football. It is controlled by the Football Association of Wales (FAW), the governing body for football in Wales and the third-oldest national football association in the world.

Australia finished top of a single four-team group that comprised New Zealand, as well as Israel and Chinese Taipei, both of whom were at the time members of FIFA but were outside their own regional confederations.

New Zealand national football team mens national association football team representing New Zealand

The New Zealand national football team represents New Zealand in international association football. The team is controlled by the governing body for football in New Zealand New Zealand Football (NZF), which is currently a member of the Oceania Football Confederation (OFC). The team's official nickname is the All Whites. New Zealand is a five-time OFC champion. The team represented New Zealand at the FIFA World Cup tournaments in 1982 and 2010, and the FIFA Confederations Cup tournaments in 1999, 2003, 2009 and 2017. Because most New Zealand football clubs are semi-professional rather than fully professional, most professional New Zealand footballers play for clubs in English-speaking countries such as England, the United States and Australia.

Israel national football team mens national association football team representing Israel

The Israel national football team is the national football team of Israel, governed by the Israel Football Association (IFA).

Chinese Taipei national football team mens national association football team representing Taiwan

The Chinese Taipei national football team is the official name given by FIFA to the national association football team of Republic of China. It is managed by the Chinese Taipei Football Association, the controlling body for football in Taiwan.

ScotlandRoundAustralia
TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 64029818
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 63128447
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 63127617
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 6105410−62
Final standings
TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 64202021810
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 6312176117
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 631213767
Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg  Chinese Taipei 6006136−350

Play-off match

In the first leg of the play-off in Hampden Park on 20 November 1985, Scotland took the lead in the 53rd minute from a twenty-yard free kick scored by Davie Cooper, hitting the ball around the wall and into the bottom right hand corner of the net. The second goal arrived in the 59th minute from Frank McAvennie who was making his senior debut for Scotland. He lobbed the ball over the goalkeeper after being set up by a header from Kenny Dalglish. The second leg on 4 December finished goalless which was enough for Scotland to advance to the 1986 FIFA World Cup finals in Mexico.

David "Davie" Cooper was a Scottish professional football player who played as a Winger for Clydebank (twice), Rangers and Motherwell. He also played for the Scotland national team. Cooper is often remembered as one of the most gifted footballers of his generation.

Francis McAvennie is a Scottish former footballer, who played as a striker for West Ham United and Celtic, having had two spells with each of these clubs. With Celtic he won the Scottish Premier Division in 1987–88 and the Scottish Cup in 1988. He was capped five times at senior level for Scotland during the 1980s, scoring one goal.

Kenny Dalglish Scottish association football player and manager

Sir Kenneth Mathieson Dalglish is a Scottish former football player and manager. He made over three hundred appearances for both Celtic and Liverpool and earned over one hundred caps for the Scotland national team. Dalglish won the Ballon d'Or Silver Award in 1983, the PFA Players' Player of the Year in 1983, and the FWA Footballer of the Year in 1979 and 1983. In 2009, FourFourTwo named Dalglish as the greatest striker in post-war British football, and in 2006, he topped a Liverpool fans' poll of "100 Players Who Shook the Kop". He has been inducted into both the Scottish and English Football Halls of Fame.

First leg

Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg2–0Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Cooper Soccerball shade.svg 53'
McAvennie Soccerball shade.svg 59'
Report
Hampden Park, Glasgow
Attendance: 61,940
Referee: Vojtech Christov (Czechoslovakia)
Flag of Scotland.svg
SCOTLAND:
GK1 Jim Leighton (Aberdeen)
DF2 Steve Nicol (Liverpool)
DF5 Alex McLeish (Aberdeen)
DF6 Willie Miller (Aberdeen)
DF3 Maurice Malpas (Dundee United)
MF8 Gordon Strachan (Aberdeen)
MF4 Graeme Souness (c) (Sampdoria)
MF10 Roy Aitken (Celtic)
MF11 Davie Cooper (Rangers)
FW7 Kenny Dalglish (Liverpool)
FW9 Frank McAvennie (West Ham United)
Substitutions:
'
Manager:
Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Ferguson
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
AUSTRALIA:
GK1 Terry Greedy (St. George)
2 Alan Davidson (Unattached)
3 Graham Jennings (Sydney Olympic)
4 Charlie Yankos (Heidelberg United)
5 David Ratcliffe (St. George)
6 Steven O'Connor (Sydney City)
7 Joe Watson (Sydney City)
8 Kenny Murphy (South Melbourne)
9 Oscar Crino (Anorthosis Famagusta)
10 David Mitchell (Eintracht Frankfurt)
11 John Kosmina (Sydney City)
Substitutions:
'
Manager:
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Frank Arok

OFFICIALS

Football Association of the Czech Republic sports governing body

The Football Association of the Czech Republic or colloquially the Czech Football Association is the governing body of football in the Czech Republic, based in Prague. It organizes the lower-level league competitions in the country, the Czech Cup, and the Czech Republic national football team.

MATCH RULES

Second leg

Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg0–0Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
Report
Olympic Park, Melbourne
Attendance: 32,000
Referee: José Roberto Wright (Brazil)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
AUSTRALIA:
GK1 Terry Greedy (St. George)
2 Alan Davidson (Unattached)
3 Graham Jennings (Sydney Olympic)
4 Charlie Yankos (Heidelberg United)
5 David Ratcliffe (St. George)
6 Robbie Dunn (Preston Makedonia)
7 Jim Patikas (Sydney Croatia)
8 Kenny Murphy (South Melbourne)
9 Oscar Crino (Anorthosis Famagusta)
10 David Mitchell (Eintracht Frankfurt)
11 John Kosmina (Sydney City)
Substitutions:
'
Manager:
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Frank Arok
Flag of Scotland.svg
SCOTLAND:
GK1 Jim Leighton (Aberdeen)
DF2 Richard Gough (Dundee United)
DF5 Alex McLeish (Aberdeen)
DF6 Willie Miller (Aberdeen)
DF3 Maurice Malpas (Dundee United)
MF8 Paul McStay (Celtic)
MF4 Graeme Souness (c) (Sampdoria)
MF10 Roy Aitken (Celtic)
MF11 Davie Cooper (Rangers)
FW7 David Speedie (Chelsea)
FW9 Frank McAvennie (West Ham United)
Substitutions:
'
Manager:
Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Ferguson

OFFICIALS

MATCH RULES

  • 90 minutes
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary
  • Penalty shoot-out if scores still level:
  • 2 (of ?) substitutions permitted

Aftermath

Scotland qualified for the 1986 FIFA World Cup Finals in Mexico and were drawn into Group E with West Germany, Uruguay and debutants Denmark. Scotland lost 1–0 to Denmark and 2–1 to West Germany. Scotland had to beat Uruguay and Uruguay played with ten men and drew 0–0. Scotland finished bottom in the group on one point.

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References

  1. "Scotland 2 Australia 0". Glasgow Herald (page 32). 21 November 1985. Retrieved 11 October 2012.
  2. "Australia 0 Scotland 0". Glasgow Herald (page 30). 5 December 1985. Retrieved 11 October 2012.