1987 Cricket World Cup

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1987 Cricket World Cup
1987 Cricket World Cup Logo.svg
Dates8 October – 8 November 1987
Administrator(s) International Cricket Council
Cricket format One Day International
Tournament format(s) Round robin and Knockout
Host(s)Flag of India.svg India
Flag of Pakistan.svg Pakistan
ChampionsFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of England.svg  England
Participants8
Matches27
Most runsFlag of England.svg Graham Gooch (471)
Most wicketsFlag of Australia (converted).svg Craig McDermott (18)
1983
1992

The 1987 Cricket World Cup (officially known as the Reliance Cup 1987) was the fourth Cricket World Cup. It was held from 8 October to 8 November 1987 in India and Pakistan – the first such tournament to be held outside England. The one-day format was unchanged from the eight-team 1983 event except for a reduction in the number of overs a team played from 60 to 50, the current standard for all ODIs.

Contents

The competition was won, for the first time, by Australia who defeated their arch-rivals England by seven runs in the second-most closely fought World Cup final to date in Kolkata's Eden Gardens stadium. The two host nations, India and Pakistan failed to reach the final, after both being eliminated in the semi-finals. The West Indies failed to live up to expectations and did not advance from the group stage. [1]

Format

The format of the competition was two groups of four teams each team playing each other twice in fifty-over matches. The top two teams from each group would advance to the semi-finals where the two winners would then advance to the final. All matches were played during daytime and– for the final time in the tournament's history– saw the teams appear in traditional white clothing and use traditional red balls as used in Test/First Class matches.

Qualification

The ICC decreed that all seven (eligible) countries holding Test status would automatically qualify for the tournament; One additional entry place would be awarded to the winners of the 1986 ICC Trophy; for the second time this was Zimbabwe, who defeated the Netherlands to earn the berth.

The following eight teams participated in the final tournament:

Venues

VenueCityCapacityMatches
India
Eden Gardens Calcutta, West Bengal120,0002
Wankhede Stadium Bombay, Maharashtra45,0002
M. A. Chidambaram Stadium Madras, Tamil Nadu50,0002
Lal Bahadur Shastri Stadium Hyderabad, Telangana 30,0001
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium Bangalore, Karnataka45,0001
Nehru Stadium Indore, Madhya Pradesh25,0001
Arun Jaitley Ground Delhi 48,0001
Sardar Patel Stadium Ahmedabad, Gujarat48,0001
Sector 16 Stadium Chandigarh, Punjab-Haryana 48,0001
Barabati Stadium Cuttack, Odisha 25,0001
Vidarbha Cricket Association Ground Nagpur, Maharashtra40,0001
Green Park Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh40,0001
Sawai Mansingh Stadium Jaipur, Rajasthan30,0001
Nehru Stadium Pune, Maharashtra25,0001
Pakistan
Iqbal Stadium Faisalabad, Punjab 25,0001
Municipal Stadium Gujranwala, Punjab 20,0001
Niaz Stadium Hyderabad, Sindh 15,0001
National Stadium Karachi, Sindh 45,0003
Gaddaffi Stadium Lahore, Punjab 65,2502
Arbab Niaz Stadium Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa 25,0001
Pindi Club Ground Rawalpindi, Punjab 25,0001

Squads

Group stage

Group A

PosTeamPldWLTNRPts RR
1Flag of India.svg  India 65100205.413
2Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 65100205.193
3Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 6240084.887
4Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 6060003.757
9 October 1987
Scorecard
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
270/6 (50 overs)
v
Flag of India.svg  India
269 (49.5 overs)
10 October 1987
Scorecard
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg
242/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe
239 (49.4 overs)
13 October 1987
Scorecard
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
235/9 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe
139 (42.4 overs)
14 October 1987
Scorecard
India  Flag of India.svg
252/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
236/8 (50 overs)
17 October 1987
Scorecard
Zimbabwe  Flag of Zimbabwe.svg
135 (44.2 overs)
v
Flag of India.svg  India
136/2 (27.5 overs)
18 October 1987
Scorecard
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
199/4 (30 overs)
v
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
196/9 (30 overs)
22 October 1987
Scorecard
India  Flag of India.svg
289/6 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
233 (49 overs)
23 October 1987
Scorecard
Zimbabwe  Flag of Zimbabwe.svg
227/5 (50 overs)
v
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
228/6 (47.4 overs)
26 October 1987
Scorecard
Zimbabwe  Flag of Zimbabwe.svg
191/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of India.svg  India
194/3 (42 overs)
27 October 1987
Scorecard
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
251/8 (50 overs)
v
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
234 (48.4 overs)
30 October 1987
Scorecard
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
266/5 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe
196/6 (50 overs)
31 October 1987
Scorecard
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg
221/9 (50 overs)
v
Flag of India.svg  India
224/1 (32.1 overs)

Group B

PosTeamPldWLTNRPts RR
1Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 65100205.007
2Flag of England.svg  England 64200165.140
3WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 63300125.160
4Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 6060004.041
8 October 1987
Scorecard
Pakistan  Flag of Pakistan.svg
267/6 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka
252 (49.2 overs)
9 October 1987
Scorecard
West Indies  WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg
243/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of England.svg  England
246/8 (49.3 overs)
13 October 1987 1
Scorecard
Pakistan  Flag of Pakistan.svg
239/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of England.svg  England
221 (48.4 overs)
13 October 1987
Scorecard
West Indies  WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg
360/4 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka
169/4 (50 overs)
16 October 1987
Scorecard
West Indies  WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg
216 (49.3 overs)
v
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan
217/9 (50 overs)
17 October 1987
Scorecard
England  Flag of England.svg
296/4 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka
158/8 (45 overs) 2
20 October 1987
Scorecard
England  Flag of England.svg
244/9 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan
247/3 (49 overs)
21 October 1987
Scorecard
West Indies  WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg
236/8 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka
211/8 (50 overs)
25 October 1987
Scorecard
Pakistan  Flag of Pakistan.svg
297/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka
184/8 (50 overs)
26 October 1987
Scorecard
England  Flag of England.svg
269/5 (50 overs)
v
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies
235 (48.1 overs)
30 October 1987
Scorecard
Sri Lanka  Flag of Sri Lanka.svg
218/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of England.svg  England
219/2 (41.2 overs)
30 October 1987
Scorecard
West Indies  WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg
258/7 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan
230/9 (50 overs)
  • Note 1: This match was scheduled for 12 October but abandoned without play due to rain. The reserve day was instead used.
  • Note 2: Rain interrupted the Sri Lankan innings; their target was reduced to 267 in 45 overs by the Average Run Rate method.

Knockout stage

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
4 November – Lahore, Pakistan
 
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 267/8
 
8 November – Calcutta, India
 
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 249
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 253/5
 
5 November – Bombay, India
 
Flag of England.svg  England 246/8
 
Flag of England.svg  England 254/6
 
 
Flag of India.svg  India 219
 

Semi-finals

Australia won the toss and chose to bat. The Australian batsmen got off to a very good start, and they scored fluently, with David Boon (65 from 91 balls, 4 fours) top scoring, and making an 82 run second-wicket partnership with DM Jones. Australia were looking to reach 300 with strong batting before Imran Khan took 3 wickets for 17 runs in 5 overs. Australia lost 4/31, but a high number of extras (34) from the Pakistani bowlers, as well as the solid batting from earlier on, brought Australia to 267 (6 wickets, 50 overs). Pakistan started badly, falling to 3/38. Imran Khan (58 from 84 balls, 4 fours) and Javed Miandad (70 from 103 balls, 4 fours) shared a partnership of 112 runs in 26 overs. However, with the required run rate at 7.87 runs when Miandad fell, there was just too much for the upcoming batsmen to do, and Pakistan lost 6/99 as they were bowled all out for 249 (all out, 49 overs). Earlier Steve Waugh scored 18 runs off the 50th over bowled by Saleem Jaffar and ironically Pakistan lost the match by 18 runs.

India won the toss and chose to field. After reaching 2/79, Graham Gooch (115 from 136 balls, 11 fours) and captain Mike Gatting (56 from 62 balls, 5 fours) shared a partnership of 117 runs in 19 overs. After Gooch was finally stumped, 51 more runs were added, and England reached 254 (6 wickets, 50 overs). India made a bad start, falling to 3/73. The middle order scored fluently, with Mohammed Azharuddin, (64 from 74 balls, 7 fours) top scoring. Before Azharuddin was removed lbw by Eddie Hemmings, India were at 5/204, needing 50 runs from the last 10 overs, with 5 wickets in hand, and it looked like it would be a very close game. However, the middle and tailend order for India collapsed, as India lost 5/15. India were eventually bowled all out for 219 (all out, 45.3 overs), giving England both a berth in the final and a measure of revenge for the loss they suffered to India in the semi-final of the World Cup four years earlier in England.

4 November 1987
Scorecard
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
267/8 (50 overs)
v
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan
249 (49 overs)
5 November 1987
Scorecard
England  Flag of England.svg
254/6 (50 overs)
v
Flag of India.svg  India
219 (45.3 overs)

Final

Australia captain Allan Border with the trophy Worldcup1987.jpg
Australia captain Allan Border with the trophy

Australia won the toss and chose to bat. David Boon (75 from 125 balls, 7 fours) top-scored for Australia, whose batsmen scored fluently. Australia posted 253 (5 wickets, 50 overs). Mike Veletta (45 from 31 balls, 6 fours) cut loose late in the innings, as Australia scored 65 runs from the last six overs of their innings. In the English reply, opener Tim Robinson was out LBW for a first ball duck. Bill Athey (58 from 103 balls, 2 fours) top-scored, and England were almost on target, when captain Mike Gatting (41 from 45 balls, 3 fours, 1 six) handed back the initiative with the loss of his wicket, going for a reverse sweep which ended a growing partnership of 69 runs in 13 overs between him and Athey. Allan Lamb (45 from 55 balls, 4 fours) also posted a great innings, but it was in vain as the required run-rate for England began to rise. When England failed to score the last 17 runs from the final over, the cup went to Australia.

8 November 1987
Scorecard
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
253/5 (50 overs)
v
Flag of England.svg  England
246/8 (50 overs)

Statistics

Records

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References

  1. "The gracious Mr Walsh". ESPNcricinfo. 5 April 2011. Archived from the original on 18 March 2011. Retrieved 5 April 2011.
  2. "24th Match: India v New Zealand at Nagpur, Oct 31, 1987". Cricinfo. Archived from the original on 5 July 2009. Retrieved 11 July 2009.