1990–91 NHL season

Last updated
1990–91 NHL season
League National Hockey League
Sport Ice hockey
DurationOctober 4, 1990 – May 25, 1991
Number of games80
Number of teams21
Draft
Top draft pick Owen Nolan
Picked by Quebec Nordiques
Regular season
Presidents' Trophy Chicago Blackhawks
Season MVP Brett Hull (Blues)
Top scorer Wayne Gretzky (Kings)
Playoffs
Eastern champions Pittsburgh Penguins
  Eastern runners-up Boston Bruins
Western champions Minnesota North Stars
  Western runners-up Edmonton Oilers
Playoffs MVP Mario Lemieux (Penguins)
Stanley Cup
Champions Pittsburgh Penguins
  Runners-up Minnesota North Stars
NHL seasons
  1989–90
1991–92  

The 1990–91 NHL season was the 74th season of the National Hockey League. The Stanley Cup winners were the Pittsburgh Penguins, who won the best of seven series 4–2 against the Minnesota North Stars. This was the last NHL season to end in May.

In an organized sports league, a typical season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session: for example, in Major League Baseball the season lasts approximately from April to October. In other team sports, like association football or basketball, it is generally from August or September to May although in some countries - such as Northern Europe or East Asia - the season starts in the spring and finishes in autumn, mainly due to weather conditions encountered during the winter.

National Hockey League North American professional ice hockey league

The National Hockey League is a professional ice hockey league in North America, currently comprising 31 teams: 24 in the United States and 7 in Canada. The NHL is considered to be the premier professional ice hockey league in the world, and one of the major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. The Stanley Cup, the oldest professional sports trophy in North America, is awarded annually to the league playoff champion at the end of each season.

Pittsburgh Penguins National Hockey League franchise in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They are members of the Metropolitan Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Penguins are one of two NHL franchises in Pennsylvania, the other being the Philadelphia Flyers. The cities' proximity has led to a rivalry known as the "Battle of Pennsylvania". The club is owned by Mario Lemieux and Ronald Burkle, who purchased the Penguins in 1999 and brought the club out of bankruptcy.

Contents

League business

At meetings in Florida on December 6, 1990, the NHL Board of Governors awarded provisional franchises to groups from Ottawa and Tampa. The Ottawa franchise marked a return to one of the original cities of the NHL, while Tampa meant the first franchise in the sunbelt state of Florida. In a later book published by NHL president Gil Stein, Stein revealed that the two groups were the only ones of the applicants who agreed to the $50 million expansion fee without question. [1] The Ottawa Senators and Tampa Bay Lightning began play in the 1992–93 season.

Gilbert Stein is an American lawyer, law instructor and former professional ice hockey executive. Stein served with the National Hockey League (NHL) as vice-president and legal counsel for nearly 15 years before becoming the fifth and last president of the NHL in 1992. Stein served in that role for a year until shortly after the owners appointed Gary Bettman to the newly created post of commissioner. Stein was initially inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1993, but withdrew after allegations that he had improperly manipulated his own nomination. Since leaving the NHL, Stein has served as a lawyer and taught sports law.

Ottawa Senators National Hockey League franchise from Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

The Ottawa Senators are a professional ice hockey team based in Ottawa, Ontario. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Senators play their home games at the 18,652-seat Canadian Tire Centre, which opened in 1996 as the Palladium.

Tampa Bay Lightning Hockey team of the National Hockey League

The Tampa Bay Lightning are a professional ice hockey team based in Tampa, Florida. The Lightning compete as a member of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The club has won one Stanley Cup championship in their history, in 2003–04. The team is often referred to as the Bolts, and the nickname was used on the former third jerseys. The Lightning plays home games in Amalie Arena in Tampa.

Regular season

Final standings

Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, GF= Goals For, GA = Goals Against, Pts = Points

Wales Conference
Adams Division
GPWLTGFGAPts
Boston Bruins 80442412299264100
Montreal Canadiens 8039301127324989
Buffalo Sabres 8031301929227881
Hartford Whalers 8031381123827673
Quebec Nordiques 8016501423635446

[2]

Patrick Division
GPWLTGFGAPts
Pittsburgh Penguins 804133634230588
New York Rangers 8036311329726585
Washington Capitals 803736725825881
New Jersey Devils 8032331527226479
Philadelphia Flyers 8033371025226776
New York Islanders 8025451022329060

[2]

Wales Conference [3]
RDivGPWLTGFGAPts
1 Boston Bruins ADM80442412299264100
2 Montreal Canadiens ADM8039301127324989
3 Pittsburgh Penguins PTK804133634230588
4 New York Rangers PTK8036311329726585
5 Washington Capitals PTK803736725825881
6 Buffalo Sabres ADM8031301929227881
7 New Jersey Devils PTK8032331527226479
8 Philadelphia Flyers PTK8033371025226776
9 Hartford Whalers ADM8031381123827673
10 New York Islanders PTK8025451022329060
11 Quebec Nordiques ADM8016501423635446

Divisions:PTK – Patrick, ADM – Adams

bold – Qualified for playoffs

Campbell Conference
Norris Division
GPWLTGFGAPts
Chicago Blackhawks 8049238284211106
St. Louis Blues 80472211310250105
Detroit Red Wings 803438827329876
Minnesota North Stars 8027391425626668
Toronto Maple Leafs 8023461124131857

[2]

Smythe Division
GPWLTGFGAPts
Los Angeles Kings 80462410340254102
Calgary Flames 8046268344263100
Edmonton Oilers 803737627227280
Vancouver Canucks 802843924331565
Winnipeg Jets 8026431126028863

[2]

Campbell Conference [4]
RDivGPWLTGFGAPts
1p – Chicago Blackhawks NRS8049238284211106
2 St. Louis Blues NRS80472211310250105
3 Los Angeles Kings SMY80462410340254102
4 Calgary Flames SMY8046268344263100
5 Edmonton Oilers SMY803737627227280
6 Detroit Red Wings NRS803438827329876
7 Minnesota North Stars NRS8027391425626668
8 Vancouver Canucks SMY802843924331565
9 Winnipeg Jets SMY8026431126028863
10 Toronto Maple Leafs NRS8023461124131857

Divisions:NRS – Norris, SMY – Smythe

bold – Qualified for playoffs; p – Won Presidents' Trophy

Presidents Trophy Ice hockey award

The Presidents' Trophy is an award presented by the National Hockey League (NHL) to the team that finishes with the most points during the NHL regular season. If two teams tie for the most points, then the Trophy goes to the team with the most wins. The Presidents' Trophy has been awarded 33 times to 17 different teams since its inception during the 1985–86 season.

Playoffs

Playoff bracket

 Division SemifinalsDivision FinalsConference FinalsStanley Cup Finals
                   
A1Boston4 
A4Hartford2 
 A1Boston4 
 
 A2Montreal3 
A2Montreal4
A3Buffalo2 
 A1Boston2 
Prince of Wales Conference
 P1Pittsburgh4 
P1Pittsburgh4 
P4New Jersey3 
 P1Pittsburgh4
 
 P3Washington1 
P2NY Rangers2
P3Washington4 
 P1Pittsburgh4
 N4Minnesota2
N1Chicago2 
N4Minnesota4 
 N4Minnesota4
 
 N2St. Louis2 
N2St. Louis4
N3Detroit3 
 N4Minnesota4
Clarence Campbell Conference
 S3Edmonton1 
S1Los Angeles4 
S4Vancouver2 
 S1Los Angeles2
 
 S3Edmonton4 
S2Calgary3
S3Edmonton4 

The North Stars defeated the Edmonton Oilers to become the first Norris Division team to appear in the Stanley Cup Finals since the 1981 realignment. At the time a record of 92 playoff games were played, and for the first time since the 1973 playoffs, no team was swept in a playoff series.

Edmonton Oilers Hockey team of the National Hockey League

The Edmonton Oilers are a professional ice hockey team based in Edmonton, Alberta. They are members of the Pacific Division of the Western Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL).

The NHL's Norris Division was formed in 1974 as part of the Prince of Wales Conference. When the NHL realigned into geographic divisions in 1981, the division moved to the Clarence Campbell Conference, where it comprised the league's Great Lakes and Midwest teams, with the Detroit Red Wings being the only member to remain from the previous season. The division existed for 19 seasons until 1993. The division was named in honour of James E. Norris, longtime owner of the Red Wings. It is the fore-runner of the NHL's Central Division. Intense rivalries developed between its constituent teams, which through the 1980s were noted for enforcer-heavy squads that had poor performances - qualifying for the playoffs with .500 points percentages, and achieving no Stanley Cup titles or appearances in the finals - but great local popularity. Although the 1985-1986 St. Louis Blues would make an impressive cinderella run reaching the Conference Finals where it took the Calgary Flames 7 games to dispatch them following the The Monday Night Miracle, and the 1990-91 Minnesota North Stars did reach the Stanley Cup finals.

The 1972–73 NHL season was the 56th season of the National Hockey League. Sixteen teams each played 78 games. Two new teams, the New York Islanders and the Atlanta Flames, made their debuts. The Montreal Canadiens won the Stanley Cup by beating the Chicago Black Hawks four games to two in the Stanley Cup Final.

Stanley Cup Finals

Pittsburgh won series 4–2

Awards

Presidents' Trophy: Chicago Blackhawks
Prince of Wales Trophy: Pittsburgh Penguins
Clarence S. Campbell Bowl: Minnesota North Stars
Art Ross Trophy: Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings
Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy: Dave Taylor, Los Angeles Kings
Calder Memorial Trophy: Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks
Conn Smythe Trophy: Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins
Frank J. Selke Trophy: Dirk Graham, Chicago Blackhawks
Hart Memorial Trophy: Brett Hull, St. Louis Blues
Jack Adams Award: Brian Sutter, St. Louis Blues
James Norris Memorial Trophy: Ray Bourque, Boston Bruins
King Clancy Memorial Trophy: Dave Taylor, Los Angeles Kings
Lady Byng Memorial Trophy: Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings
Lester B. Pearson Award: Brett Hull, St. Louis Blues
NHL Plus/Minus Award: Marty McSorley, Los Angeles Kings & Theo Fleury, Calgary Flames
Vezina Trophy: Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks
William M. Jennings Trophy: Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks
Lester Patrick Trophy: Rod Gilbert, Mike Ilitch

All-Star teams

First Team  Position  Second Team
Ed Belfour, Chicago Blackhawks G Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens
Chris Chelios, Chicago Blackhawks D Ray Bourque, Boston Bruins
Al MacInnis, Calgary Flames D Paul Coffey, Pittsburgh Penguins
Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings C Adam Oates, St. Louis Blues
Brett Hull, St. Louis Blues RW Cam Neely, Boston Bruins
Luc Robitaille, Los Angeles Kings LW Kevin Stevens, Pittsburgh Penguins

Player statistics

Scoring leaders

Note: GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes, PPG = Powerplay goals, SHG = Shorthanded goals, GWG = Game winning goals

PlayerTeamGPGAPtsPIM+/-PPGSHGGWG
Wayne Gretzky Los Angeles Kings 784112216316+30805
Brett Hull St. Louis Blues 78864513122+2329011
Adam Oates St. Louis Blues 61259011529+15313
Mark Recchi Pittsburgh Penguins 7840731134801209
John Cullen Pittsburgh Penguins/Hartford Whalers 783971110101-61403
Joe Sakic Quebec Nordiques 80486110924-261237
Steve Yzerman Detroit Red Wings 80515710834-21264
Theoren Fleury Calgary Flames 795153104136+48979
Al MacInnis Calgary Flames 78287510390+421701
Steve Larmer Chicago Blackhawks 80445710179+371729

[2]

Leading goaltenders

GP = Games played; Min = Minutes played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; SO = Shutouts; GAA = Goals against average

Goals against average Goalkeeping statistic used by several sports and many leagues

Goals Against Average (GAA) is a statistic used in field hockey, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer and water polo that is the mean of goals allowed per game by a goaltender/goalkeeper. GAA is analogous to a baseball pitcher's earned run average (ERA). In Japanese, the same translation (防御率) is used for both GAA and ERA, because of this.

PlayerTeamGPMinWLTSOGAA
Ed Belfour Chicago Blackhawks 7441274319742.47
Tim Cheveldae Detroit Red Wings 6536153026523.55
Bill Ranford Edmonton Oilers 6034152727303.2
Ron Tugnutt Quebec Nordiques 56314412291004.05
Peter Ing Toronto Maple Leafs 5631261629813.84
Jon Casey Minnesota North Stars 55318521201132.98
Bob Essensa Winnipeg Jets 5529161924643.15
Mike Vernon Calgary Flames 5431213119313.31
Glenn Healy New York Islanders 5329991824903.32
Chris Terreri New Jersey Devils 5329702421712.91

Coaches

Patrick Division

John Paul Cunniff was an American NHL hockey coach and former professional player who appeared in 65 World Hockey Association regular season games between 1972 and 1976. Cunniff was inducted into the United States Hockey Hall of Fame in 2003.

Tom McVie Canadian ice hockey coach

Tom McVie is a former coach in the National Hockey League.

Al Arbour Canadian ice hockey player, coach and executive

Alger Joseph Arbour was a Canadian ice hockey player, coach, and executive. He is third to Joel Quenneville for games coached in National Hockey League history and fourth all-time in wins, behind Scotty Bowman, Joel Quenneville and Ken Hitchcock. Under Arbour, the New York Islanders won four consecutive Stanley Cups from 1980 to 1983. Born in Sudbury, Ontario, Arbour played amateur hockey as a defenceman with the Windsor Spitfires of the Ontario Hockey League. He played his first professional games with the Detroit Red Wings in 1953. Claimed by the Chicago Black Hawks in 1958, Arbour would help the team win a championship in 1961. Arbour played with the Toronto Maple Leafs for the next five years, winning another Cup in 1962. He was selected by the St. Louis Blues in their 1967 expansion draft and played his final four seasons with the team.

Adams Division

Norris Division

Smythe Division

Milestones

Debuts

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1990–91 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last games

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1990–91 (listed with their last team):

Trading deadline

Hat-tricks

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

Notes
  1. Stein, Gil (1997). Power Play: An Inside Look at the Big Business of the National Hockey League. Birch Lane Press.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Dan Diamond & Associates. p. 153. ISBN   9781894801225.
  3. "1990–1991 Conference Standings". National Hockey League. Retrieved June 30, 2014.
  4. "1990-1991 Conference Standings Standings - NHL.com - Standings". NHL.Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  5. NHL trade deadline: Deals since 1980 | Habs Inside/Out Archived 2009-02-16 at the Wayback Machine