1992–93 New York Knicks season

Last updated
1992–93   New York Knicks season
Division champions
Head coach Pat Riley
General manager Ernie Grunfeld
Owners Paramount Communications, Inc.
Arena Madison Square Garden
Results
Record6022 (.732)
PlaceDivision: 1st (Atlantic)
Conference: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish Eastern Conference Finals
(Lost to Bulls 2–4)

Stats @ Basketball-Reference.com
Local media
Television MSG Network
Radio WFAN
< 1991–92 1993–94 >

The 1992–93 New York Knicks season was the 47th season for the Knicks in the National Basketball Association (NBA). [1] During the offseason, the Knicks acquired Charles D. Smith, Doc Rivers and Bo Kimble from the Los Angeles Clippers. [2] Other acquisitions included Rolando Blackman from the Dallas Mavericks, [3] Tony Campbell from the Minnesota Timberwolves, [4] and free agent Herb Williams. [5] The Knicks finished the season by winning 24 of their final 28 games, including a nine-game winning streak in March and five straight victories to end the season. [6] The team had the most wins in the Eastern Conference during the regular season; their 60–22 record earned them the conference's top seed in the 1993 NBA Playoffs. [7] They also posted a 37–4 home record at Madison Square Garden. [6] Head coach Pat Riley was named Coach of The Year, [8] and Patrick Ewing was selected for the 1993 NBA All-Star Game. [7]

Contents

In the opening round of the playoffs, the Knicks defeated the Indiana Pacers, three games to one, and advanced to the conference semifinals. The Knicks won their series with the 5th-seeded Charlotte Hornets in five games and gained a spot in the Eastern Conference Finals, [7] where they faced the Chicago Bulls, who had eliminated the Knicks from the playoffs in three of the previous four years. [9] After taking a 2–0 series lead, New York lost the next four games to end its season. [7]

NBA Draft

RoundPickPlayerPositionNationalitySchool/Club Team
120 Hubert Davis SGFlag of the United States.svg  United States North Carolina

Roster

Roster listing
New York Knicks roster
PlayersCoaches
Pos.No.NameHeightWeightDOB (YYYY-MM-DD)From
PF 42 Flag of the United States.svg Anderson, Eric 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)220 lb (100 kg) Indiana
PG 50 Flag of the United States.svg Anthony, Greg 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)176 lb (80 kg) UNLV
SG 20 Flag of the United States.svg Blackman, Rolando 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)190 lb (86 kg) Kansas State
SF 9 Flag of the United States.svg Campbell, Tony 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)215 lb (98 kg) Ohio State
SG 44 Flag of the United States.svg Davis, Hubert 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)183 lb (83 kg) North Carolina
C 33 Flag of the United States.svg Ewing, Patrick 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m)240 lb (109 kg) Georgetown
SG 16 Flag of the United States.svg Kimble, Bo 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)190 lb (86 kg) Loyola Marymount
PF 14 Flag of the United States.svg Mason, Anthony 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)250 lb (113 kg) Tennessee State
PF 34 Flag of the United States.svg Oakley, Charles 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)225 lb (102 kg) Virginia Union
PG 25 Flag of the United States.svg Rivers, Doc 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)185 lb (84 kg) Marquette
SF 54 Flag of the United States.svg Smith, Charles D. 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m)230 lb (104 kg) Pittsburgh
SG 3 Flag of the United States.svg Starks, John 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)180 lb (82 kg) Oklahoma State
C 32 Flag of the United States.svg Williams, Herb 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m)242 lb (110 kg) Ohio State
Head coach

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (DP) Unsigned draft pick
  • (FA) Free agent
  • (S) Suspended
  • Cruz Roja.svg Injured

Regular season

Season standings

Atlantic Division WLPCTGBHomeRoadDiv
y- New York Knicks 6022.73237–423–1823–5
x- Boston Celtics 4834.5851228–1320–2119–9
x- New Jersey Nets 4339.5241726–1517–2414–14
Orlando Magic 4141.5001927–1414–2715–13
Miami Heat 3646.4392426–1510–319–19
Philadelphia 76ers 2656.3173415–2611–3011–17
Washington Bullets 2260.2683815–267–347–21
y – clinched division title
x – clinched playoff spot
# Eastern Conference
TeamWLPCTGB
1c-New York Knicks 6022.732
2y-Chicago Bulls 5725.6953
3x-Cleveland Cavaliers 5428.6596
4x-Boston Celtics 4834.58512
5x-Charlotte Hornets 4438.53716
6x-New Jersey Nets 4339.52417
7x-Atlanta Hawks 4339.52417
8x-Indiana Pacers 4141.50019
9 Orlando Magic 4141.50019
10 Detroit Pistons 4042.48820
11 Miami Heat 3646.43924
12 Milwaukee Bucks 2854.34132
13 Philadelphia 76ers 2656.31736
14 Washington Bullets 2260.26838
z – clinched division title
y – clinched division title
x – clinched playoff spot

Record vs. opponents

1992–93 NBA Records
TeamATLBOSCHACHICLEDALDENDETGSWHOUINDLACLALMIAMILMINNJNNYKORLPHIPHOPORSACSASSEAUTAWAS
Atlanta 2–23–22–20–51–12–02–32–01–12–21–11–13–13–22–01–32–21–33–10–21–11–12–01–12–02–2
Boston 2–23–11–33–12–02–01–32–01–12–21–11–13–12–22–04–01–43–24–10–22–01–11–10–20–24–1
Charlotte 2–31–32–31–32–01–14–12–00–20–51–11–12–23–12–02–21–33–14–00–21–12–01–11–11–14–0
Chicago 2–23–13–22–32–01–13–12–00–25–02–00–23–14–12–04–01–33–12–21–12–02–00–22–02–04–0
Cleveland 5–01–33–13–22–01–13–22–01–14–01–12–02–24–12–02–21–32–24–02–00–21–11–11–11–13–1
Dallas 1–10–20–20–20–21–51–10–41–41–10–41–30–20–21–40–20–21–11–10–40–40–40–51–30–51–1
Denver 0–20–21–11–11–15–11–13–12–31–12–21–30–21–13–21–11–10–21–11–31–33–11–41–32–32–0
Detroit 3–23–11–41–32–31–11–10–21–13–21–11–11–32–21–13–12–23–13–10–21–12–00–20–20–24–0
Golden State 0–20–20–20–20–24–01–32–02–20–22–31–42–01–13–11–10–21–11–11–40–54–13–11–43–11–1
Houston 1–11–12–02–01–14–13–21–12–22–04–03–12–01–14–21–11–11–12–02–21–34–04–11–34–11–1
Indiana 2–22–25–00–50–41–11–12–32–00–21–11–12–22–31–13–11–32–23–11–11–12–01–12–00–23–1
L.A. Clippers 1–11–11–10–21–14–02–21–13–20–41–13–20–22–04–00–22–01–11–13–22–33–20–41–42–22–0
L.A. Lakers 1–11–11–12–00–23–13–11–14–11–31–12–30–21–13–10–20–21–12–00–53–23–22–21–41–32–0
Miami 1–31–32–21–32–22–02–03–10–20–22–22–02–02–22–02–30–53–21–30–21–11–11–11–10–22–3
Milwaukee 2–32–21–31–41–42–01–12–21–11–13–20–21–12–21–10–41–32–22–20–20–21–10–20–20–21–3
Minnesota 0–20–20–20–20–24–12–31–11–32–41–10–41–30–21–11–10–20–20–20–41–31–31–40–41–41–1
New Jersey 3–10–42–20–42–22–01–11–31–11–11–32–02–03–24–01–11–33–23–21–10–22–01–11–11–14–1
New York2–24–13–13–13–12–01–12–22–01–13–10–22–05–03–12–03–12–25–01–11–12–02–01–11–14–1
Orlando 3–12–31–31–32–21–12–01–31–11–12–21–11–12–32–22–02–32–23–20–22–02–00–20–21–14–0
Philadelphia 1–31–40–42–20–41–11–11–31–10–21–31–10–23–12–22–02–30–52–30–20–21–10–21–10–23–1
Phoenix 2–02–02–01–10–24–03–12–04–12–21–12–35–02–02–04–01–11–12–02–03–25–03–12–33–12–0
Portland 1–10–21–10–22–04–03–11–15–03–11–13–22–31–12–03–12–01–10–22–02–35–02–22–32–21–1
Sacramento 1–11–10–20–21–14–01–30–21–40–40–22–32–31–11–13–10–20–20–21–10–50–52–21–42–21–1
San Antonio 0–21–11–12–01–15–04–12–01–31–41–14–02–21–12–04–11–10–22–02–01–32–22–23–13–31–1
Seattle 1–12–01–10–21–13–13–12–04–13–10–24–14–11–12–04–01–11–12–01–13–23–24–11–32–22–0
Utah 0–22–01–10–21–15–03–22–01–31–42–02–23–12–02–04–11–11–11–12–01–32–22–23–32–21–1
Washington 2–21–40–40–41–31–10–20–41–11–11–30–20–23–23–11–11–41–40–41–30–21–11–11–10–21–1

Game log

#DateOpponentScoreRecord
1November 6@ Atlanta 106–941–0
2November 7 Philadelphia 89–852–0
3November 10 New Jersey 99–963–0
4November 13@ Washington 104–1063–1
5November 14 Boston 85–804–1
6November 16@ Portland 94–1094–2
7November 17@ Seattle 90–1004–3
8November 19@ L.A. Clippers 91–1014–4
9November 21 Orlando 92–775–4
10November 24Washington98–886–4
11November 25@ Minnesota 99–787–4
12November 28 Chicago 112–758–4
13November 29@ Detroit 76–928–5
14December 1Portland101–859–5
15December 3@ Cleveland 90–1009–6
16December 5 Milwaukee 111–9810–6
17December 8Seattle100–8811–6
18December 10 Charlotte 103–110 (OT)11–7
19December 12Detroit95–8812–7
20December 14 Denver 106–8913–7
21December 15@ New Jersey108–9414–7
22December 18@ Boston113–8715–7
23December 19 Miami 91–8716–7
24December 25@ Chicago77–8916–8
25December 26@ Milwaukee100–102 (OT)16–9
26December 29 Indiana 97–9117–9
27December 30@ Indiana94–9018–9
28January 2L.A. Clippers97–98 (OT)18–10
29January 5Cleveland95–9119–10
30January 8@ Orlando94–9519–11
31January 10Boston97–10019–12
32January 12@ Sacramento 104–9320–12
33January 13@ Denver92–10820–13
34January 15@ Dallas 107–9321–13
35January 16@ Houston 102–10421–14
36January 18 Phoenix 106–10322–14
37January 20Charlotte114–9123–14
38January 22@ Philadelphia109–9124–14
39January 26Philadelphia98–9025–14
40January 28Atlanta105–11025–15
41February 2Washington105–10026–15
42February 4 Golden State 105–10127–15
43February 5@ Miami108–10528–15
44February 7Miami104–8229–15
45February 8@ Philadelphia120–115 (OT)30–15
46February 11Houston125–9531–15
47February 12@ Chicago104–9832–15
48February 14@ Orlando100–102 (3OT)32–16
49February 16Dallas117–8733–16
50February 17@ Charlotte124–11634–16
51February 23Minnesota95–9135–16
52February 24@ Milwaukee91–9036–16
53February 26@ Detroit80–10836–17
54February 28@ New Jersey76–10236–18
55March 2Atlanta107–9837–18
56March 4 Utah 125–11138–18
57March 8Orlando109–107 (OT)39–18
58March 10 L.A. Lakers 110–10440–18
59March 12@ Washington109–9841–18
60March 14Indiana121–9042–18
61March 16Milwaukee102–9943–18
62March 18@ Cleveland115–9544–18
63March 21 San Antonio 115–9645–18
64March 23@ Phoenix92–12145–19
65March 25@ Utah87–10445–20
66March 26@ L.A. Lakers105–9546–20
67March 28@ Golden State94–8447–20
68March 30Sacramento109–8748–20
69April 1Cleveland91–8349–20
70April 2@ Miami123–10750–20
71April 4@ San Antonio108–103 (OT)51–20
72April 6@ Atlanta104–109 (OT)51–21
73April 8Boston110–8852–21
74April 11@ Boston102–9053–21
75April 13Washington93–8554–21
76April 14@ Charlotte111–10755–21
77April 16@ Indiana94–10055–22
78April 17Detroit95–8556–22
79April 20@ Miami109–9757–22
80April 21New Jersey105–7458–22
81April 23@ Philadelphia99–8459–22
82April 25Chicago89–8460–22

Source: [6]

Playoffs

East First Round

(1) New York Knicks vs. (8) Indiana Pacers: Knicks win series 3–1

Last Playoff Meeting: Not available (first playoff series)

East Conference Semifinals

(1) New York Knicks vs. (5) Charlotte Hornets: Knicks win series 4–1

Last Playoff Meeting: Not available (first playoff series)

East Conference Finals

(1) New York Knicks vs. (2) Chicago Bulls : Bulls win series 4–2 (after trailing 2–0 to Knicks)

Last Playoff Meeting: 1992 Eastern Conference Semifinals (Chicago won 4–3)

Player statistics

Legend
  GPGames played  GS Games started MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field-goal percentage 3P%  3-point field-goal percentage FT%  Free-throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game APG  Assists per game SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game PPG  Points per game

Season

Playoffs

Awards and records

Transactions

Related Research Articles

1999 NBA playoffs

The 1999 NBA playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Association’s 1998-99 season. The tournament concluded with the Western Conference champion San Antonio Spurs defeating the Eastern Conference champion New York Knicks 4 games to 1. Tim Duncan was named NBA Finals MVP.

The 1998 NBA playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Association's 1997–98 season. The tournament concluded with the Eastern Conference champion Chicago Bulls defeating the Western Conference champion Utah Jazz 4 games to 2 in the NBA Finals. The Bulls also achieved a second three peat, a goal unrivaled since the Boston Celtics in 1966. The 1998 playoffs was the last involving the Jordan-led Bulls. Michael Jordan was named NBA Finals MVP for the sixth and final time.

The 1995 NBA playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Association's 1994–95 season. The tournament concluded with the Western Conference champion Houston Rockets defeating the Eastern Conference champion Orlando Magic 4 games to 0 in the NBA Finals. Hakeem Olajuwon was named NBA Finals MVP for the second straight time.

The 1994 NBA playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Association's 1993-94 season. The tournament concluded with the Western Conference champion Houston Rockets defeating the Eastern Conference champion New York Knicks 4 games to 3 in the NBA Finals. Hakeem Olajuwon was named NBA Finals MVP.

The 1993 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Association's 1992–93 season. The tournament concluded with the Eastern Conference champion Chicago Bulls defeating the Western Conference champion Phoenix Suns 4 games to 2 in the NBA Finals. Michael Jordan was named NBA Finals MVP for the third straight year. This was the Suns' second Western Conference title; they made their first NBA Finals appearance since 1976, losing to the Boston Celtics.

The 1992 NBA playoffs was the postseason tournament following the National Basketball Association's 1991-92 season. The tournament concluded with the Eastern Conference champion Chicago Bulls defeating the Western Conference champion Portland Trail Blazers 4 games to 2 in the NBA Finals. Michael Jordan was named NBA Finals MVP for the second straight year.

The 1990 NBA playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Association's 1989–90 season. The tournament concluded with the Eastern Conference champion Detroit Pistons defeating the Western Conference champion Portland Trail Blazers 4 games to 1 in the NBA Finals. Isiah Thomas was named NBA Finals MVP.

The 1991–92 NBA season was the Bulls' 26th season in the National Basketball Association. The Bulls entered the season as defending NBA champions, having defeated the Los Angeles Lakers in the 1991 NBA Finals in five games, and winning their first NBA championship in franchise history. This Bulls team is regarded as one of the greatest in the 90s Bulls dynasty. Early into the season, the Bulls traded Dennis Hopson to the Sacramento Kings after the first two games. Coming off their first ever championship, the Bulls had a very successful season winning 14 consecutive games after a 1–2 start to the season. They later on posted a 13-game winning streak in January, which led them to a 37–5 start. The Bulls finished in first place in the Central Division, along with having the best record in the league at 67–15. Michael Jordan captured his second straight MVP, and sixth straight scoring title. He was also selected for the 1992 NBA All-Star Game along with Scottie Pippen.

The 1992–93 NBA season was the Bulls' 27th season in the National Basketball Association. The Bulls entered the season as the back-to-back defending NBA champions, having defeated the Portland Trail Blazers in the 1992 NBA Finals in six games, winning their second NBA championship. After two straight championships, the Bulls would yet again have another successful season finishing in first place in the Central Division, and second overall in the Eastern Conference with a 57–25 record. They also advanced to the Eastern Conference Finals for the fifth consecutive season, becoming the first team since the 1987–88 Boston Celtics to do so. Michael Jordan once again led the league in scoring with 32.6 points per game, and was selected for the 1993 NBA All-Star Game along with Scottie Pippen.

Knicks–Pacers rivalry National Basketball Association rivalry

The Knicks–Pacers rivalry started in 1977 and quickly became one of the most bitter in NBA history. They met in the playoffs 6 times from 1993–2000, fueling a rivalry epitomized by the enmity between Reggie Miller and prominent Knick fan Spike Lee. Miller likened it to the Hatfield–McCoy feud, and The New York Times said in 1998 that it was "as combustible as any in the league".

The 1994–95 NBA season was the Pacers' 19th season in the National Basketball Association, and 28th season as a franchise. After appearing in their first Conference Finals, the Pacers improved their fortunes by adding Mark Jackson, who was acquired from the Los Angeles Clippers. The move would pay off as the Pacers won their first Division title since joining the NBA. The Pacers finished the season with a 52–30 record, as Rik Smits had a career year as he averaged 17.9 points and 7.7 rebounds per game. Reggie Miller was selected for the 1995 NBA All-Star Game, which was his first All-Star appearance since 1990.

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Pacers' 23rd season in the National Basketball Association, and 32nd season as a franchise. The Pacers entered the season as a heavy favorite, because Michael Jordan retired and other members of the Chicago Bulls were broken up by their management. During the offseason, the team signed free agent Sam Perkins, who played in the 1991 NBA Finals with the Los Angeles Lakers, and the 1996 NBA Finals with the Seattle SuperSonics. After a four-month lockout, the Pacers won the Central Division with a record of 33 wins and 17 losses. Reggie Miller led the team in scoring averaging 18.4 points per game.

The 1991–92 NBA season was the 46th season of the National Basketball Association in New York City. In the offseason, the Knicks hired Pat Riley to take over as head coach, while acquiring All-Star forward Xavier McDaniel from the Phoenix Suns, and signing free agent Anthony Mason. Riley, who previously coached the Los Angeles Lakers two years ago had an impact, as the Knicks finished second in the Atlantic Division with a 51–31 record. Patrick Ewing was selected for the 1992 NBA All-Star Game. In the first round of the playoffs, the Knicks eliminated the Detroit Pistons in five games. In the semifinals, the Knicks faced off against the defending champion Chicago Bulls for the second straight year. The Knicks frustrated the Bulls and Michael Jordan with their physical play. The Knicks lost in seven games as the Bulls–Knicks rivalry was born.

The 1998–99 NBA season was the 52nd season of the National Basketball Association in New York City. The head coach was Jeff Van Gundy, serving for his 4th year. The team played its home games at Madison Square Garden in New York City. To give All-Star center Patrick Ewing more help offensively and defensively, the Knicks acquired All-Star guard Latrell Sprewell from the Golden State Warriors and Marcus Camby from the Toronto Raptors. The team also signed free agent Kurt Thomas and re-signed Herb Williams during the offseason. However, because of the lockout shortened season, and injuries to Sprewell and Ewing, the Knicks had to build chemistry on the fly, and barely made the playoffs with a 27–23 record. The Knicks had to win six of its remaining eight games just to qualify.

The 1994–95 New York Knicks season was the 49th season for the Knicks in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Knicks entered the season as runner-ups of the 1994 NBA Finals, where they lost to the Houston Rockets in seven games. During the offseason, the Knicks acquired Doug Christie from the Los Angeles Lakers. However, Christie would play only twelve games because of an ankle injury. Early into the season, the team released Doc Rivers, who later signed as a free agent with the San Antonio Spurs. The Knicks posted a 55–27 record in the Atlantic Division, and finished in second place, two games behind the Orlando Magic. By earning the #3 seed in the Eastern Conference, the Knicks qualified for the NBA Playoffs for the eighth consecutive season. Patrick Ewing was selected for the 1995 NBA All-Star Game. John Starks led the league with 217 three-point field goals, and became the first player ever to reach up to 200 three-pointers in a single season. Power forward Anthony Mason was named Sixth Man of the Year.

The 1983–84 New York Knicks season was the 38th season for the team in the National Basketball Association (NBA). In the regular season, the Knicks had a 47–35 record, and qualified for the NBA Playoffs as the fifth seed in the Eastern Conference. New York was led by small forward Bernard King, who averaged 26.3 points per game (PPG) in the regular season and 34.8 PPG in the playoffs. In early 1984, King scored 50 points in consecutive games, against the San Antonio Spurs and Dallas Mavericks.

The 1988–89 New York Knicks season was the 43rd season for the team in the National Basketball Association (NBA). During the offseason, the Knicks acquired Charles Oakley from the Chicago Bulls. In the regular season, the Knicks had a 52–30 record and won the Atlantic Division. New York swept the Philadelphia 76ers in the opening round of the playoffs to advance to the Eastern Conference Semifinals, where the team lost to the Bulls in six games. Mark Jackson and Patrick Ewing were selected to play in the 1989 NBA All-Star Game.

The 1991–92 NBA season was the Pistons' 44th season in the National Basketball Association, and 35th season in the city of Detroit. During the offseason, the Pistons acquired Orlando Woolridge from the Denver Nuggets. The Pistons got off to a slow start with a 9–13 record, but managed to win 10 of their next 13 games. They won seven consecutive games in March, then won six in a row in April, finishing third in the Central Division with a 48–34 record. Three members of the team, Isiah Thomas, Joe Dumars and Dennis Rodman were all selected for the 1992 NBA All-Star Game. Despite leading the league with an incredible 18.7 rebounds per game, Rodman fell short of his quest for a third straight Defensive Player of The Year award. Throughout the season, speculation that it was Chuck Daly's last season as coach of the Pistons lingered in the media, intensifying as the season went out and well into the playoffs.

The 1992–93 NBA season was the Pacers' 17th season in the National Basketball Association, and 26th season as a franchise. In the offseason, the Pacers acquired Pooh Richardson and Sam Mitchell from the Minnesota Timberwolves. The team played mediocre basketball once again losing six straight games after a 13–10 start. After playing around .500 in late January, they went on a 7-game losing streak in February. However, on the final day of the regular season, they defeated the Miami Heat 94–88, finishing fifth in the Central Division with a 41–41 record, and winning a tie-breaker over the Orlando Magic for the #8 seed in the Eastern Conference. Reggie Miller tied in first place in the league with 167 three-point field goals, and Detlef Schrempf averaged 19.1 points per game while being selected for the 1993 NBA All-Star Game.

The 1993–94 New Jersey Nets season was the Nets' 27th season in the National Basketball Association, and 18th season in East Rutherford, New Jersey. During the offseason, the Nets signed free agents Kevin Edwards and Armen Gilliam, while acquiring Benoit Benjamin from the Los Angeles Lakers. Without Dražen Petrović, who died in an automobile accident during the offseason; Derrick Coleman and Kenny Anderson would both step it up, having All-Star seasons being selected for the 1994 NBA All-Star Game. The Nets got off to a rough start losing 10 of their first 14 games, as they later on traded Rumeal Robinson to the Charlotte Hornets for Johnny Newman. However, the Nets would win 8 of their final 11 games finishing third in the Atlantic Division with a 45–37 record. In the first round of the playoffs, the Nets would lose in four games to the New York Knicks. Following the season, a frustrated Chuck Daly stepped down as head coach after clashing with Coleman and Anderson, and Newman signed as a free agent with the Milwaukee Bucks.

References

  1. "New York Knicks". Basketball-Reference. Retrieved January 7, 2019.
  2. Brown, Clifton (September 23, 1992). "Basketball; Knicks Get Trade, Thanks to Roberts". The New York Times . Retrieved November 2, 2015.
  3. "Knicks get Blackman in trade". Ocala Star-Banner. June 25, 1992. p. 2C. Retrieved August 5, 2016.
  4. "Knicks deal for Tony Campbell". Ocala Star-Banner. September 15, 1992. p. 2C. Retrieved August 5, 2016.
  5. "Herb Williams". National Basketball Association. Retrieved August 5, 2016.
  6. 1 2 3 "1992–93 New York Knicks Schedule and Results". Basketball-Reference. Retrieved July 28, 2016.
  7. 1 2 3 4 "1992–93 NBA Season Summary". Basketball-Reference. Archived from the original on 24 March 2010. Retrieved March 20, 2010.
  8. "NBA & ABA Coach of the Year Award Winners". Basketball-Reference. Retrieved February 11, 2017.
  9. Brown, Clifton (May 8, 1994). "Pro Basketball; Knicks Have a Score To Settle With Chicago". The New York Times. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  10. Anderson, Dave (May 6, 1993). "Sports of The Times; Getting The Knicks' Goat". The New York Times. Retrieved August 5, 2016.