1992 Western Australian daylight saving referendum

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A referendum was held on 4 April 1992 in the Australian state of Western Australia on the topic of introducing daylight saving. It was the third of four such proposals which have been put to Western Australian voters, and followed a trial over the 1991–1992 summer. The referendum failed to pass, with a majority of 53.14% voting against the proposal.

Referendum results

Question:Are you in favour of the standard time in the State being advanced one hour from the last Sunday in October 1992 until the first Sunday in March 1993 and in similar fashion for each year thereafter?

Trial PeriodReferendum DateOutcome
17 November 1991 - 1 March 19924 April 1992REJECTED
YESNO
46.86%53.14%

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