1993

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From left, clockwise: Ramzi Yousef and other Islamic terrorists detonate a truck bomb in the subterranean garage of the North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City, killing 7; the Russian White House is shelled during a constitutional crisis after Russian president Boris Yeltsin imposed a self-coup; Czechoslovakia is peacefully dissolved into the Czech Republic and Slovakia; in the U.S., the ATF besieges a compound belonging to David Koresh and the Branch Davidians in a search for illegal weapons, which ends in the building being set alight and killing most inside; Eritrea overwhelmingly votes to gain independence from Ethiopia; a major snow storm passes over the U.S. and Canada, leading to 318 fatalities; drug lord and narcoterrorist Pablo Escobar is killed by Colombian special forces; the Oslo I Accord is signed in an attempt to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. 1993 Events Collage.png
From left, clockwise: Ramzi Yousef and other Islamic terrorists detonate a truck bomb in the subterranean garage of the North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City, killing 7; the Russian White House is shelled during a constitutional crisis after Russian president Boris Yeltsin imposed a self-coup; Czechoslovakia is peacefully dissolved into the Czech Republic and Slovakia; in the U.S., the ATF besieges a compound belonging to David Koresh and the Branch Davidians in a search for illegal weapons, which ends in the building being set alight and killing most inside; Eritrea overwhelmingly votes to gain independence from Ethiopia; a major snow storm passes over the U.S. and Canada, leading to 318 fatalities; drug lord and narcoterrorist Pablo Escobar is killed by Colombian special forces; the Oslo I Accord is signed in an attempt to resolve the Israeli–Palestinian conflict.
Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1993 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1993
MCMXCIII
Ab urbe condita 2746
Armenian calendar 1442
ԹՎ ՌՆԽԲ
Assyrian calendar 6743
Baháʼí calendar 149–150
Balinese saka calendar 1914–1915
Bengali calendar 1400
Berber calendar 2943
British Regnal year 41  Eliz. 2   42  Eliz. 2
Buddhist calendar 2537
Burmese calendar 1355
Byzantine calendar 7501–7502
Chinese calendar 壬申年 (Water  Monkey)
4690 or 4483
     to 
癸酉年 (Water  Rooster)
4691 or 4484
Coptic calendar 1709–1710
Discordian calendar 3159
Ethiopian calendar 1985–1986
Hebrew calendar 5753–5754
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 2049–2050
 - Shaka Samvat 1914–1915
 - Kali Yuga 5093–5094
Holocene calendar 11993
Igbo calendar 993–994
Iranian calendar 1371–1372
Islamic calendar 1413–1414
Japanese calendar Heisei 5
(平成5年)
Javanese calendar 1925–1926
Juche calendar 82
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 13 days
Korean calendar 4326
Minguo calendar ROC 82
民國82年
Nanakshahi calendar 525
Thai solar calendar 2536
Tibetan calendar 阳水猴年
(male Water-Monkey)
2119 or 1738 or 966
     to 
阴水鸡年
(female Water-Rooster)
2120 or 1739 or 967
Unix time 725846400 – 757382399

1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1993rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 993rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 93rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1990s decade.

Contents

1993 was designated as:

The year 1993 in the Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands had only 364 days, since its calendar advanced 24 hours to the Eastern Hemisphere side of the International Date Line, skipping August 21, 1993. [1]

Events

January

February

The aftermath of the World Trade Center bombing. WTC 1993 ATF Commons.jpg
The aftermath of the World Trade Center bombing.

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Births and deaths

Nobel Prizes

Nobel medal.png

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1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1997th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 997th year of the 2nd millennium, the 97th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1990s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1990</span> Calendar year

1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1990th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 990th year of the 2nd millennium, the 90th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1990s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1996</span> Calendar year

1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1996th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 996th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1990s decade.

1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1992nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 992nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1990s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1991</span> Calendar year

1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1991st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 991st year of the 2nd millennium, the 91st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1990s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1989</span> Calendar year

1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1989th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 989th year of the 2nd millennium, the 89th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1980s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2004</span> Calendar year

2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2004th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 4th year of the 3rd millennium and the 21st century, and the 5th year of the 2000s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2003</span> Calendar year

2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2003rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 3rd year of the 3rd millennium and the 21st century, and the 4th year of the 2000s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2006</span> Calendar year

2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2006th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 6th year of the 3rd millennium and the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2000s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2007</span> Calendar year

2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2007th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 7th year of the 3rd millennium and the 21st century, and the 8th year of the 2000s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2015</span> Calendar year

2015 (MMXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2015th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 15th year of the 3rd millennium and the 21st century, and the 6th year of the 2010s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2018</span> Calendar year

2018 (MMXVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2018th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 18th year of the 3rd millennium and the 21st century, and the 9th year of the 2010s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2022</span> Calendar year

2022 (MMXXII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2022nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 22nd year of the 3rd millennium and the 21st century, and the 3rd year of the 2020s decade.

2023 (MMXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2023rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 23rd year of the 3rd millennium and the 21st century, and the 4th year of the 2020s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Isaias Afwerki</span> President of Eritrea since 1993

Isaias Afwerki is an Eritrean politician and partisan who has been the president of Eritrea since shortly after he led the Eritrean People's Liberation Front (EPLF) to victory on 24 May 1991, ending the 30-year-old war for independence from Ethiopia. In addition to being president, Isaias has been the chairman of Eritrea's sole legal political party, the People's Front for Democracy and Justice (PFDJ). As Eritrea has never had a functioning constitution, no elections, no legislature and no published budget, Isaias has been the sole power in the country, controlling its judiciary and military. Hence, scholars and historians have long considered him to be a dictator, described his regime as totalitarian, by way of forced conscription; the United Nations and Amnesty International cited him for human rights violations. In 2022, Reporters Without Borders ranked Eritrea, under the government of Isaias, last out of 180 countries in its Press Freedom Index. In 2023 Eritrea ranked 174th out of 180 countries on the Press Freedom Index.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Barham Salih</span> President of Iraq from 2018 to 2022

Barham Salih is an Iraqi Kurdish politician who served as the eighth president of Iraq from 2018 to 2022.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Council of Representatives of Iraq</span> Legislature of Iraq

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This is a timeline of the 21st century.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Abiy Ahmed</span> Prime Minister of Ethiopia since 2018

Abiy Ahmed Ali is an Ethiopian politician serving as the third Prime Minister of Ethiopia since 2018, and as the leader of the Prosperity Party since 2019. He was awarded the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize "for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea". Abiy served as the third chairman of the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) that governed Ethiopia for 28 years and the first person of Oromo descent to hold that position. Abiy is a member of the Ethiopian parliament, and was a member of the Oromo Democratic Party (ODP), one of the then four coalition parties of the EPRDF, until its rule ceased in 2019 and he formed his own party, the Prosperity Party.

The 1995 Ethiopian Federal Constitution formalizes an ethnic federalism law aimed at undermining long-standing ethnic imperial rule, reducing ethnic tensions, promoting regional autonomy, and upholding unqualified rights to self-determination and secession in a state with more than 80 different ethnic groups. But the constitution is divisive, both among Ethiopian nationalists who believe it undermines centralized authority and fuels interethnic conflict, and among ethnic federalists who fear that the development of its vague components could lead to authoritarian centralization or even the maintenance of minority ethnic hegemony. Parliamentary elections since 1995 have taken place every five years since enactment. All but one of these have resulted in government by members of the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) political coalition, under three prime ministers. The EPRDF was under the effective control of the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF), which represents a small ethnic minority. In 2019 the EPRDF, under Abiy, was dissolved and he inaugurated the pan-ethnic Prosperity Party which won the 2021 Ethiopian Election, returning him as prime minister. But both political entities were different kinds of responses to the ongoing tension between constitutional ethnic federalism and the Ethiopian state's authority. Over the same period, and all administrations, a range of major conflicts with ethnic roots have occurred or continued, and the press and availability of information have been controlled. There has also been dramatic economic growth and liberalization, which has itself been attributed to, and used to justify, authoritarian state policy.

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Sources