1993–94 Bundesliga

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Bundesliga
Season1993–94
Dates6 August 1993 – 7 May 1994
Champions Bayern Munich
12th Bundesliga title
13th German title
Relegated 1. FC Nürnberg
Wattenscheid 09
VfB Leipzig
Champions League Bayern Munich
Cup Winners' Cup Werder Bremen
UEFA Cup 1. FC Kaiserslautern
Bayer Leverkusen
Borussia Dortmund
Eintracht Frankfurt
Matches played306
Goals scored876 (2.86 per match)
Top goalscorer Stefan Kuntz,
Anthony Yeboah (18)
Biggest home winsix games with a differential of +5 each (6–1 once, 5–0 five times)
Biggest away win Duisburg 1–7 K'lautern
Highest scoring Duisburg 1–7 K'lautern
1994–95

The 1993–94 Bundesliga was the 31st season of the Bundesliga, Germany's premier football league. It began on 6 August 1993 [1] and ended on 7 May 1994. [2] SV Werder Bremen were the defending champions.

Contents

Teams

VfL Bochum, Bayer 05 Uerdingen and 1. FC Saarbrücken were relegated to the 2. Bundesliga after finishing in the last three places. They were replaced by SC Freiburg, MSV Duisburg and VfB Leipzig.

ClubLocationGround [3] Capacity [3]
Bayer Leverkusen Leverkusen Ulrich-Haberland-Stadion 27,800
Bayern Munich Munich Olympiastadion 63,000
Borussia Dortmund Dortmund Westfalenstadion 42,800
Borussia Mönchengladbach Mönchengladbach Bökelbergstadion 34,500
Dynamo Dresden Dresden Rudolf-Harbig-Stadion 30,000
Eintracht Frankfurt Frankfurt am Main Waldstadion 62,000
SC Freiburg Freiburg Dreisamstadion 15,000
Hamburger SV Hamburg Volksparkstadion 62,000
1. FC Kaiserslautern Kaiserslautern Fritz-Walter-Stadion 38,500
Karlsruher SC Karlsruhe Wildparkstadion 40,000
1. FC Köln Cologne Müngersdorfer Stadion 55,000
VfB Leipzig Leipzig Zentralstadion 37,000
MSV Duisburg Duisburg Wedaustadion 31,500
1. FC Nürnberg Nuremberg Frankenstadion 55,000
FC Schalke 04 Gelsenkirchen Parkstadion 70,000
VfB Stuttgart Stuttgart Neckarstadion 53,700
SG Wattenscheid 09 Bochum Lohrheidestadion 15,000
Werder Bremen Bremen Weserstadion 32,000

League table

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification or relegation
1 Bayern Munich (C)34171076837+3144Qualification to Champions League group stage
2 1. FC Kaiserslautern 3418796436+2843Qualification to UEFA Cup first round
3 Bayer Leverkusen 34141196047+1339
4 Borussia Dortmund 34159104945+439
5 Eintracht Frankfurt 34158115741+1638
6 Karlsruher SC 341410104643+338
7 VfB Stuttgart 341311105143+837
8 Werder Bremen 341310115144+736Qualification to Cup Winners' Cup first round
9 MSV Duisburg 341481241521136
10 Borussia Mönchengladbach 34147136559+635
11 1. FC Köln 34146144951234
12 Hamburger SV 34138134852434
13 Dynamo Dresden [lower-alpha 1] 3410141033441130
14 Schalke 04 341091538501229
15 SC Freiburg 34108165457328
16 1. FC Nürnberg (R)341081641551428Relegation to 2. Bundesliga
17 SG Wattenscheid 09 (R)346111748702223
18 VfB Leipzig (R)343112032693717
Source: www.dfb.de
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. Dynamo Dresden were docked four points because of financial irregularities.

Results

Home \ Away SVW BVB SGD DUI SGE SCF HSV FCK KSC KOE LEI B04 BMG FCB FCN S04 VFB SGW
Werder Bremen 4–00–11–51–03–2 0–2 2–00–23–13–12–14–21–02–20–15–10–0
Borussia Dortmund 3–24–02–12–03–22–12–12–12–10–11–03–01–14–1 1–1 1–22–0
Dynamo Dresden 1–03–00–10–41–21–13–11–11–11–01–12–11–11–11–01–01–1
MSV Duisburg 1–02–21–11–00–20–11–71–20–02–12–22–02–21–01–02–22–1
Eintracht Frankfurt 2–22–03–21–23–01–11–03–10–32–12–00–32–21–11–30–05–1
SC Freiburg 0–04–10–11–21–30–12–33–32–41–01–03–33–10–02–32–14–1
Hamburger SV 1–1 0–01–10–13–01–11–31–12–43–02–11–31–25–24–13–22–1
1. FC Kaiserslautern 2–32–00–02–01–11–03–00–03–01–03–24–24–03–10–05–04–1
Karlsruher SC 0–33–31–05–01–02–12–01–12–03–22–01–01–13–20–00–02–0
1. FC Köln 2–02–00–11–02–32–03–00–22–13–11–10–40–40–11–13–13–2
VfB Leipzig 1–12–33–31–11–02–21–40–01–02–32–31–11–30–22–20–00–0
Bayer Leverkusen 2–22–11–12–12–22–11–23–23–12–13–10–12–14–05–11–11–1
Borussia Mönchengladbach 3–20–02–14–10–41–12–23–11–24–16–12–22–02–03–20–23–3
Bayern Munich 2–00–05–04–02–13–14–04–01–01–03–01–13–1 5–0 [lower-alpha 1] 2–01–33–3
1. FC Nürnberg 0–10–03–00–01–52–20–10–21–11–05–02–32–4 2–0 1–01–04–1
Schalke 04 1–1 1–0 0–01–31–31–31–02–02–01–23–11–12–11–11–20–14–1
VfB Stuttgart 0–02–23–04–00–20–44–01–13–01–10–01–43–02–21–03–03–0
SG Wattenscheid 2–21–21–10–20–03–13–10–25–12–22–21–23–11–32–13–02–4
Source: DFB
Legend: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.
Notes:
  1. The Bayern Munich v 1. FC Nürnberg match from 23 April 1994, which finished with a score of 2–1, was annulled by the DFB and was required to be replayed due to Bayern Munich player Thomas Helmer scoring a ghost goal. The replay took place on 3 May 1994 and finished with a score of 5–0.

Top goalscorers

18 goals
17 goals
14 goals
13 goals

Champion squad

FC Bayern Munich
Goalkeepers: Raimond Aumann (32); Uwe Gospodarek (2).

Defenders: Oliver Kreuzer (31); Thomas Helmer (28 / 2); Jorginho Flag of Brazil.svg (24 / 2); Olaf Thon (15 / 1); Dieter Frey (12 / 1); Markus Münch (10).
Midfielders: Lothar Matthäus (captain; 33 / 8); Christian Nerlinger (32 / 9); Markus Schupp (32 / 4); Christian Ziege (29 / 3); Mehmet Scholl (27 / 11); Michael Sternkopf (21 / 2); Jan Wouters Flag of the Netherlands.svg (16 / 1); Dietmar Hamann (5 / 1).
Forwards: Marcel Witeczek (27 / 3); Adolfo Valencia Flag of Colombia.svg (25 / 11); Bruno Labbadia (20 / 7); Alexander Zickler (8 / 1); Harald Cerny Flag of Austria.svg (3); Mazinho Flag of Brazil.svg (1).
(league appearances and goals listed in brackets)

Managers: Erich Ribbeck (until 27 December 1993); Franz Beckenbauer (from 7 January 1994).

On the roster but have not played in a league game: Sven Scheuer; Roland Grahammer; Wolfgang Gerstmeier; Aleksandr Karatayev Flag of Russia.svg ; Oliver Stegmayer.

Transferred out during the season: Jan Wouters Flag of the Netherlands.svg (to PSV Eindhoven); Harald Cerny Flag of Austria.svg (to FC Admira/Wacker); Mazinho Flag of Brazil.svg (on loan to Internacional).

See also

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References

  1. "Schedule Round 1". DFB. Archived from the original on 8 June 2011.
  2. "Archive 1993/1994 Round 34". DFB. Archived from the original on 8 June 2011.
  3. 1 2 Grüne, Hardy (2001). Enzyklopädie des deutschen Ligafußballs, Band 7: Vereinslexikon (in German). Kassel: AGON Sportverlag. ISBN   3-89784-147-9.