1994–95 FA Premier League

Last updated

FA Premier League
Season 1994–95
Dates20 August 1994 – 14 May 1995
Champions Blackburn Rovers
1st Premier League title
3rd English title
Relegated Crystal Palace
Norwich City
Leicester City
Ipswich Town
Champions League Blackburn Rovers
Cup Winners' Cup Everton
UEFA Cup Manchester United
Nottingham Forest
Liverpool
Leeds United
Matches played462
Goals scored1,195 (2.59 per match)
Average goals/game2.59
Top goalscorer Alan Shearer
(34 goals)
Biggest home win Manchester United 9–0 Ipswich Town
(4 March 1995)
Biggest away win Sheffield Wednesday 1–7 Nottingham Forest
(1 April 1995)
Highest scoringManchester United 9–0 Ipswich Town
(4 March 1995)
Longest winning run7 games [1]
Blackburn Rovers
Longest unbeaten run13 games [1]
Nottingham Forest
Longest winless run12 games [1]
Everton
Southampton
Longest losing run8 games [1]
Ipswich Town
Highest attendance43,868 [2]
Manchester United v Sheffield Wednesday
(7 May 1995)
Lowest attendance5,268 [2]
Wimbledon v Manchester City
(21 March 1995)
1995–96

The 1994–95 FA Premier League (known as the FA Carling Premiership for sponsorship reasons) was the third season of the Premier League, the top division of professional football in England.

Contents

Overview

Transfers

Just before the start of the 1994–95 season, the English transfer record was broken when Blackburn Rovers paid £5 million for 21-year-old Norwich City striker Chris Sutton. But that record was broken again in January when Manchester United paid £6 million for Newcastle United's Andy Cole, in a deal which also saw £1 million-rated Keith Gillespie move to Newcastle. Other significant transfers before and during the 1994–95 season included: Vinny Samways (Tottenham to Everton, £2 million), David Rocastle (Manchester City to Chelsea, £1.25 million), Jürgen Klinsmann (Monaco to Tottenham Hotspur, £2 million), John Scales (Wimbledon to Liverpool, £3 million) and Paul Kitson (Derby County to Newcastle United, £2.2 million).

Summary

The title race was won by Blackburn Rovers, whose last title success was in 1914, and also was Blackburn's first major trophy in 67 years (last 1927–28 FA Cup). [3] Kenny Dalglish's side secured the championship on the last day of the season despite losing 2–1 at his former club Liverpool, as Manchester United could only manage a 1–1 draw at West Ham. [4] This meant that Blackburn Rovers qualified for the European Cup for the first time in their history, while Manchester United finished second earning a UEFA Cup place. A single point separated the two sides, who for more than half of the season enjoyed a wide gap in terms of point between themselves and the rest of the league, despite the likes of Nottingham Forest, Liverpool and Newcastle United briefly topping the league during the first three months of the season.

Also qualifying for the UEFA Cup were Nottingham Forest (who finished third in their first season back in the Premier League), Liverpool (who finished fourth and won their fifth League Cup in the club's first full season following the appointment of Roy Evans) and fifth placed Leeds United.

The number of teams in the league for the following year would be reduced to 20. This was to be achieved by increasing the number of teams facing relegation to four, and reducing the number of teams being promoted from Division 1 to two.

Controversial incidents

In January 1995, Manchester United's 28-year-old French striker Eric Cantona (then holder of the PFA Players' Player of the Year award) assaulted a Crystal Palace fan who racially abused him [5] in his team's 1–1 draw at Selhurst Park. Cantona was banned from football for eight months, fined £20,000 and sentenced to 14 days in prison. The prison sentence was later reduced to 120 hours community service on appeal.

Chelsea midfielder Dennis Wise was convicted of criminal damage and assault, relating to a fight with a taxi driver in London. He was given a three-month prison sentence but the conviction and prison sentence were quickly overturned on appeal.

Arsenal midfielder Paul Merson admitted in November 1994 that he was an alcoholic and was also addicted to cocaine and gambling. He underwent a three-month drug rehabilitation programme before being allowed to resume his playing career.

Crystal Palace striker Chris Armstrong failed a drugs test in February 1995 but admitted that he had done wrong and returned to action after just four weeks undergoing rehabilitation. Armstrong was Palace's leading goalscorer in 1994–95, helping them reach the semi finals of both domestic cup competitions, but was unable to prevent them from being relegated back to the First Division just one season after winning promotion.

Arsenal manager George Graham was sacked in February 1995 after nearly nine years in charge, when it was revealed that he had accepted an illegal payment of £425,000 from Norwegian agent Rune Hauge relating to the purchases of Norwegian and Danish players Pål Lydersen and John Jensen three years earlier. Graham was later banned from football for one year by the FA.

Teams

Twenty-two teams competed in the league – the top nineteen teams from the previous season and the three teams promoted from the First Division. The promoted teams were Crystal Palace, Nottingham Forest (both teams returning to the top flight after a season's absence) and Leicester City (returning after a top flight absence of seven years). This was also Leicester City's first season in the Premier League. They replaced Sheffield United, Oldham Athletic and Swindon Town, ending their top flight spells of four, three and one year respectively.

Stadiums and Locations

Greater Manchester UK location map 2.svg
Greater Manchester Premier League football clubs
TeamLocationStadiumCapacity
Arsenal London (Highbury) Arsenal Stadium 38,419
Aston Villa Birmingham Villa Park 39,399
Blackburn Rovers Blackburn Ewood Park 31,367
Chelsea London (Fulham) Stamford Bridge 36,000
Coventry City Coventry Highfield Road 23,489
Crystal Palace London (Selhurst) Selhurst Park 26,309
Everton Liverpool (Walton) Goodison Park 40,157
Ipswich Town Ipswich Portman Road 30,300
Leeds United Leeds Elland Road 40,204
Leicester City Leicester Filbert Street 22,000
Liverpool Liverpool (Anfield) Anfield 42,730
Manchester City Manchester Maine Road 35,150
Manchester United Old Trafford Old Trafford 55,314
Newcastle United Newcastle upon Tyne St James' Park 36,649
Norwich City Norwich Carrow Road 27,010
Nottingham Forest West Bridgford City Ground 30,539
Queens Park Rangers London (Shepherd's Bush) Loftus Road 18,439
Sheffield Wednesday Sheffield Hillsborough Stadium 39,859
Southampton Southampton The Dell 15,200
Tottenham Hotspur London (Tottenham) White Hart Lane 36,230
West Ham United London (Upton Park) Boleyn Ground 28,000
Wimbledon London (Wimbledon) Selhurst Park [lower-alpha 1] 26,309
  1. Due to Wimbledon lacking a home stadium, they played their home games at Selhurst Park, which is the home stadium of Crystal Palace.

Personnel and kits

(as of 14 May 1995)

TeamManagerCaptainKit manufacturerShirt sponsor
Arsenal Flag of Scotland.svg Stewart Houston (caretaker) Flag of England.svg Tony Adams Nike JVC
Aston Villa Flag of England.svg Brian Little Flag of England.svg Kevin Richardson Asics Müller
Blackburn Rovers Flag of Scotland.svg Kenny Dalglish Flag of England.svg Tim Sherwood Asics McEwan's Lager
Chelsea Flag of England.svg Glenn Hoddle Flag of England.svg Dennis Wise Umbro Coors
Coventry City Flag of England.svg Ron Atkinson Flag of England.svg Brian Borrows Pony Peugeot
Crystal Palace Flag of England.svg Alan Smith Flag of England.svg Gareth Southgate Nutmeg TDK
Everton Flag of England.svg Joe Royle Flag of England.svg Dave Watson Umbro NEC
Ipswich Town Flag of Scotland.svg George Burley Flag of England.svg Steve Palmer Umbro Fisons
Leeds United Flag of England.svg Howard Wilkinson Flag of Scotland.svg Gary McAllister Asics Thistle Hotels
Leicester City Flag of Scotland.svg Mark McGhee Flag of England.svg Steve Walsh Fox Leisure Walkers
Liverpool Flag of England.svg Roy Evans Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ian Rush Adidas Carlsberg
Manchester City Flag of England.svg Brian Horton Flag of England.svg Keith Curle Umbro Brother
Manchester United Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Ferguson Flag of England.svg Steve Bruce Umbro Sharp
Newcastle United Flag of England.svg Kevin Keegan Flag of England.svg Peter Beardsley Asics Scottish and Newcastle Breweries
Norwich City Flag of England.svg Gary Megson (caretaker) Flag of England.svg Jon Newsome Ribero Norwich and Peterborough
Nottingham Forest Flag of England.svg Frank Clark Flag of England.svg Stuart Pearce Umbro Labatt's
Queens Park Rangers Flag of England.svg Ray Wilkins Flag of England.svg David Bardsley Clubhouse Compaq
Sheffield Wednesday Flag of England.svg Trevor Francis Flag of England.svg Chris Waddle Puma Sanderson
Southampton Flag of England.svg Alan Ball Flag of England.svg Matt Le Tissier Pony Dimplex
Tottenham Hotspur Flag of England.svg Gerry Francis Flag of England.svg Gary Mabbutt Umbro Holsten
West Ham United Flag of England.svg Harry Redknapp Flag of England.svg Steve Potts PonyDagenham Motors
Wimbledon Flag of Ireland.svg Joe Kinnear Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Vinnie Jones Ribero Elonex

Managerial changes

TeamOutgoing managerManner of departureDate of vacancyPosition in tableIncoming managerDate of appointment
West Ham United Flag of England.svg Billy Bonds Resigned10 August 1994Pre-season Flag of England.svg Harry Redknapp 10 August 1994
Tottenham Hotspur Flag of Argentina.svg Osvaldo Ardiles Sacked1 November 199411th Flag of England.svg Steve Perryman (caretaker)1 November 1994
Everton Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Mike Walker 8 November 199422nd Flag of England.svg Joe Royle 10 November 1994
Aston Villa Flag of England.svg Ron Atkinson 10 November 199419th Flag of England.svg Jim Barron (caretaker)10 November 1994
Tottenham Hotspur Flag of England.svg Steve Perryman End of caretaker spell15 November 199413th Flag of England.svg Gerry Francis 15 November 1994
Queens Park Rangers Flag of England.svg Gerry Francis Resigned18th Flag of England.svg Ray Wilkins
Leicester City Flag of England.svg Brian Little Resigned22 November 199420th Flag of Scotland.svg Kevin MacDonald (caretaker)22 November 1994
Aston Villa Flag of England.svg Jim Barron End of caretaker spell25 November 199419th Flag of England.svg Brian Little 25 November 1994
Ipswich Town Flag of England.svg John Lyall Resigned5 December 199422nd Flag of England.svg Paul Goddard (caretaker)5 December 1994
Leicester City Flag of Scotland.svg Kevin MacDonald End of caretaker spell14 December 199421st Flag of Scotland.svg Mark McGhee 14 December 1994
Ipswich Town Flag of England.svg Paul Goddard 28 December 199422nd Flag of Scotland.svg George Burley 28 December 1994
Coventry City Flag of England.svg Phil Neal Sacked14 February 199513th Flag of England.svg Ron Atkinson 15 February 1995
Arsenal Flag of Scotland.svg George Graham 21 February 199512th Flag of Scotland.svg Stewart Houston 21 February 1995
Norwich City Flag of England.svg John Deehan Resigned9 April 199520th Flag of England.svg Gary Megson (caretaker)9 April 1995

League table

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification or relegation
1 Blackburn Rovers (C)4227878039+4189Qualification for the Champions League group stage
2 Manchester United 42261067728+4988Qualification for the UEFA Cup first round [lower-alpha 1]
3 Nottingham Forest 42221197243+2977
4 Liverpool 422111106537+2874
5 Leeds United 42201395938+2173
6 Newcastle United 422012106747+2072
7 Tottenham Hotspur 421614126658+862
8 Queens Park Rangers 42179166159+260
9 Wimbledon 4215111648651756
10 Southampton 421218126163254
11 Chelsea 421315145055554
12 Arsenal 421312175249+351
13 Sheffield Wednesday 421312174957851
14 West Ham United 421311184448450
15 Everton 421117144451750Qualification for the Cup Winners' Cup first round [lower-alpha 2]
16 Coventry City 4212141644621850
17 Manchester City 4212131753641149
18 Aston Villa 421115165156548
19 Crystal Palace (R)4211121934491545Relegation to the Football League First Division
20 Norwich City (R)4210131937541743
21 Leicester City (R)426112545803529
22 Ipswich Town (R)42762936935727
Source: Premier League
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated
Notes:
  1. Leeds United were rewarded entry to the UEFA Cup through UEFA Fair Play ranking.
  2. Everton qualified for the Cup Winners' Cup as FA Cup winners.

Results

Home \ Away ARS AVL BLB CHE COV CRY EVE IPS LEE LEI LIV MCI MUN NEW NOR NFO QPR SHW SOU TOT WHU WIM
Arsenal 0–00–03–12–11–21–14–11–31–10–13–00–02–35–11–01–30–01–1 1–1 0–10–0
Aston Villa 0–40–13–00–01–10–02–00–04–42–01–11–20–21–10–22–11–11–11–00–27–1
Blackburn Rovers 3–13–12–14–02–13–04–11–13–03–22–32–41–00–03–04–03–13–22–04–22–1
Chelsea 2–11–01–22–20–00–12–0 0–3 4–00–03–02–31–12–00–21–01–10–21–11–21–1
Coventry City 0–10–11–12–21–40–02–02–14–21–11–02–30–01–00–00–12–01–30–42–01–1
Crystal Palace 0–30–00–10–10–21–03–01–22–01–62–11–10–10–11–20–02–10–01–11–00–0
Everton 1–12–21–23–30–23–14–13–01–1 2–0 1–11–02–02–11–22–21–40–00–01–00–0
Ipswich Town 0–20–11–32–22–00–20–12–04–11–31–23–20–2 1–2 0–10–11–22–11–31–12–2
Leeds United 1–01–01–1 2–3 3–03–11–04–02–10–22–02–10–02–11–04–00–10–01–12–23–1
Leicester City 2–11–10–01–12–20–12–22–01–31–20–10–41–31–02–41–10–14–33–11–23–4
Liverpool 3–03–22–13–12–30–0 0–0 0–10–12–02–0 2–0 2–04–01–01–14–13–11–10–03–0
Manchester City 1–22–21–31–20–01–14–02–00–00–12–1 0–3 0–02–03–32–33–23–35–23–02–0
Manchester United 3–01–01–00–02–03–02–0 9–0 0–01–1 2–0 5–0 2–01–01–22–01–02–10–01–03–0
Newcastle United 1–03–11–14–24–03–22–01–11–23–11–10–01–13–02–12–12–15–13–32–02–1
Norwich City 0–01–12–13–02–20–00–0 3–0 2–12–11–21–10–22–10–14–20–02–20–21–01–2
Nottingham Forest 2–21–20–20–12–01–02–14–13–01–01–11–01–10–01–03–24–13–02–21–13–1
Queens Park Rangers 3–12–00–1 1–0 2–20–12–31–23–22–02–11–22–33–02–01–13–22–22–12–10–1
Sheffield Wednesday 3–11–20–11–15–11–00–04–11–11–01–21–11–00–00–01–70–21–13–41–00–1
Southampton 1–02–11–10–10–03–12–03–11–32–20–22–22–23–11–11–12–10–04–31–12–3
Tottenham Hotspur 1–0 3–43–10–01–30–02–13–01–11–00–02–10–14–21–01–41–13–11–23–11–2
West Ham United 0–21–02–01–20–11–02–21–10–01–03–03–01–11–32–23–10–00–22–01–23–0
Wimbledon 1–34–30–31–12–02–02–11–10–02–10–02–00–13–21–02–21–30–10–21–21–0
Source: [ citation needed ]
Legend: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.

Season statistics

Scoring

Top scorers

Blackburn's Alan Shearer was the top scorer in the 1994-95 Premier League season, with 34 goals. Alan Shearer 2008.jpg
Blackburn's Alan Shearer was the top scorer in the 1994–95 Premier League season, with 34 goals.
RankPlayerClubGoals
1 Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn Rovers34
2 Flag of England.svg Robbie Fowler Liverpool25
3 Flag of England.svg Les Ferdinand Queens Park Rangers24
4 Flag of England.svg Stan Collymore Nottingham Forest22
5 Flag of England.svg Andy Cole Newcastle United
Manchester United
21
Flag of Germany.svg Jürgen Klinsmann Tottenham Hotspur21
7 Flag of England.svg Matt Le Tissier Southampton19
8 Flag of England.svg Teddy Sheringham Tottenham Hotspur18
Flag of England.svg Ian Wright Arsenal18
10 Flag of Germany.svg Uwe Rösler Manchester City15
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Dean Saunders Aston Villa15
Flag of England.svg Chris Sutton Blackburn Rovers15

Hat-tricks

In addition to his hat-trick, Manchester United's Andy Cole became the first player to score five goals in a Premier League match. Andy Cole (13047502155) (cropped).jpg
In addition to his hat-trick, Manchester United's Andy Cole became the first player to score five goals in a Premier League match.
PlayerForAgainstResultDateRef
Flag of England.svg Chris Sutton Blackburn RoversCoventry City4–0 (H)27 August 1994 [6]
Flag of England.svg Robbie Fowler LiverpoolArsenal4–3 (H)28 August 1994 [7]
Flag of Russia.svg Andrei Kanchelskis Manchester UnitedManchester City5–0 (H)10 November 1994 [8]
Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn RoversQueens Park Rangers4–0 (H)26 November 1994 [9]
Flag of England.svg Teddy Sheringham Tottenham HotspurNewcastle United4–2 (H)3 December 1994 [10]
Flag of England.svg Tony Cottee West Ham UnitedManchester City3–0 (H)17 December 1994 [11]
Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn RoversWest Ham United4–2 (H)30 October 1994 [12]
Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn RoversIpswich Town4–1 (H)2 January 1995 [13]
Flag of England.svg Tommy Johnson Aston VillaWimbledon7–1 (H)11 February 1995 [14]
Flag of England.svg Andy Cole 5Manchester UnitedIpswich Town 9–0 (H) 4 March 1995 [15]
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg Peter Ndlovu Coventry CityLiverpool3–2 (A)14 March 1995 [16]
Flag of Ghana.svg Tony Yeboah Leeds UnitedIpswich Town4–0 (H)5 April 1995 [17]
Flag of England.svg Ian Wright ArsenalIpswich Town4–1 (H)15 April 1995 [18]
Note:5 Player scored 5 goals; (H) – Home; (A) – Away

Top assists

Southampton's Matt Le Tissier assisted 15 goals for the club in the 1994-95 Premier League season. Matthew Le Tissier.jpg
Southampton's Matt Le Tissier assisted 15 goals for the club in the 1994–95 Premier League season.
RankPlayerClubAssists [19]
1 Flag of England.svg Matt Le Tissier Southampton15
2 Flag of England.svg Darren Anderton Tottenham Hotspur14
3 Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn Rovers13
4 Flag of England.svg Ruel Fox Norwich City11
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ryan Giggs Manchester United
Flag of England.svg Andy Hinchcliffe Everton
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Bryan Roy Nottingham Forest
8 Flag of England.svg Kevin Gallen Queens Park Rangers10
Flag of Germany.svg Jürgen Klinsmann Tottenham Hotspur
Flag of England.svg Chris Sutton Blackburn Rovers

Awards

Tottenham's Jurgen Klinsmann was the inaugural Player of the Month. Trainer Klinsmann.JPG
Tottenham's Jürgen Klinsmann was the inaugural Player of the Month.

Monthly awards

Month Manager of the Month Player of the Month
ManagerClubPlayerClub
August Flag of England.svg Kevin Keegan Newcastle United Flag of Germany.svg Jürgen Klinsmann Tottenham Hotspur
September Flag of England.svg Frank Clark Nottingham Forest Flag of England.svg Rob Lee Newcastle United
October Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Ferguson Manchester United Flag of England.svg Paul Ince Manchester United
November Flag of Scotland.svg Kenny Dalglish Blackburn Rovers Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn Rovers
Flag of England.svg Chris Sutton
December Flag of England.svg Gerry Francis Tottenham Hotspur Flag of England.svg Matt Le Tissier Southampton
January Flag of England.svg Brian Little Aston Villa Flag of England.svg Chris Waddle Sheffield Wednesday
February Flag of England.svg Kevin Keegan Newcastle United Flag of Scotland.svg Duncan Ferguson Everton
March Flag of England.svg Ron Atkinson Coventry City Flag of Ghana.svg Tony Yeboah Leeds United
April Flag of England.svg Howard Wilkinson Leeds United Flag of England.svg David Seaman Arsenal

Annual awards

AwardWinnerClub
Premier League Manager of the Season Flag of Scotland.svg Kenny Dalglish Blackburn Rovers
PFA Players' Player of the Year Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer [20] Blackburn Rovers
PFA Young Player of the Year Flag of England.svg Robbie Fowler [21] Liverpool
FWA Footballer of the Year Flag of Germany.svg Jürgen Klinsmann [22] Tottenham Hotspur
PFA Team of the Year
Goalkeeper Flag of England.svg Tim Flowers (Blackburn Rovers)
Defence Flag of England.svg Rob Jones (Liverpool) Flag of England.svg Gary Pallister (Manchester United) Flag of Scotland.svg Colin Hendry (Blackburn Rovers) Flag of England.svg Graeme Le Saux (Blackburn Rovers)
Midfield Flag of England.svg Tim Sherwood (Blackburn Rovers) Flag of England.svg Matt Le Tissier (Southampton) Flag of England.svg Paul Ince (Manchester United)
Attack Flag of Germany.svg Jürgen Klinsmann (Tottenham Hotspur) Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer
(Blackburn Rovers)
Flag of England.svg Chris Sutton (Blackburn Rovers)

See also

References and notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 "English Premier League 1994–95". statto.com. Archived from the original on 19 February 2015. Retrieved 19 February 2015.
  2. 1 2 "Premier League 1994/1995 – Attendances" . Retrieved 21 April 2015.
  3. "Blackburn Rovers winning the Premier League might never be surpassed". The Telegraph. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
  4. "Liverpool 2 Blackburn 1". LFC History. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
  5. https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/premier-league/eric-cantona-kung-fu-kick-manchester-united-crystal-palace-epl-remember-when-a9301031.html
  6. Barton, Mark (29 August 1994). "Football: Sutton punishes sorry Coventry: Rovers leave it late". The Independent. London. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  7. McNulty, Phil (25 February 2004). "The hat-trick Hall of Fame". BBC Sport. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  8. Smith, Rory (8 May 2009). "Manchester United v Manchester City: Five classic derbies". Daily Telegraph. London. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  9. "Blackburn 4–0 QPR". Soccerbase. Retrieved 14 July 2009.[ permanent dead link ]
  10. "Tottenham Hotspur 4–2 Newcastle United". Soccerbase. Archived from the original on 3 May 2005. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  11. "West Ham United 3–0 Manchester City". Soccerbase. Archived from the original on 26 August 2005. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  12. Hodgson, Guy (3 January 1995). "Blackburn put clear by superb Shearer". The Independent. London. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  13. "Liverpool 4–0 Southampton". Soccerbase. Archived from the original on 27 August 2005. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  14. Bramwell, Neil (12 February 1995). "Seven up for Villa". The Independent. London. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  15. "A nightmare revisited". BBC Sport. 3 July 2000. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  16. Tyler, Martin (23 April 2009). "Andrey the giant". Sky Sports. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  17. Allsop, Derick (6 April 1995). "Yeboah's hat-trick buries Ipswich". The Independent. London. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  18. Houston, Bob (16 April 1995). "Hat-trick is the Wright response". The Independent. London. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  19. "Statistical Leaders – 1993". Premier League. Archived from the original on 24 June 2017. Retrieved 5 May 2018.
  20. England Player Honours – Professional Footballers' Association Players' Players of the Year
  21. England Player Honours – Professional Footballers' Association Young Players of the Year
  22. England Player Honours – Football Writers' Association Footballers of the Year

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This article covers the squad and match results for the 1994–95 season at the English football (soccer) club Newcastle United F.C. Newcastle United participated in the FA Premier League, finishing in 6th place.

During the 1994–95 English football season, Arsenal competed in the FA Premier League.

The Premier League is an English professional league for association football clubs. At the top of the English football league system, it is the country's primary football competition and is contested by 20 clubs. The competition was formed in February 1992 following the decision of clubs in the Football League First Division to break away from The Football League, in order to take advantage of a lucrative television rights deal. This page details the records and statistics of the league.

The 1994–95 Southampton F.C. season was the club's third in the Premier League, and their 25th in the top division of English football. Having narrowly avoided relegation from the league the previous season, the club were looking to improve their performances in order to remain in the top flight for another year. After finishing 18th in the division for two consecutive seasons, Southampton managed to finish 10th in the Premier League, their best top-flight finish since 1990. They also reached the fifth round of the FA Cup, and the third round of the League Cup.