1994 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament

Last updated
1994 NCAA Division I
women's basketball tournament
1994WomensFinalFourLogo.jpg
Teams64
Finals site Richmond Coliseum
Richmond, Virginia
Champions North Carolina Tar Heels (1st title)
Runner-up Louisiana Tech Techsters (5th title game)
Semifinalists
NCAA Division I women's tournaments
« 1993 1995 »

The 1994 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament featured 64 teams for the first time ever. The Final Four consisted of North Carolina, Purdue, Louisiana Tech, and Alabama, with North Carolina defeating Louisiana Tech 60–59 to win its first NCAA title on a 3-point shot by Charlotte Smith as time expired. The ball was inbounded with only 00:00.7 left on the clock, making it one of the most exciting finishes in tournament history. [1]

Contents

Notable events

The Alabama team was a six seed in the Midwest region. After beating the 11 seed Oregon State, they faced a higher seed, Iowa, who were seeded third in the region. Alabama won that game, and went on to face another higher seed in Texas Tech, the defending national champions. Alabama won again, and went on to face Penn State, the top seed in the region. Alabama won yet again, this time by 14 points, to advance to their first final Four. [2]

In the semi-final game of the Final Four, they faced Louisiana Tech, a team they had played earlier in the year. In their December match-up, Alabama had beaten the Lady Techsters by 22 points, 99–77. In this game La tech opened up a six-point lead at the half. Alabama's All-American guard Niesa Johnson cut her hand on a locker room sink, which required seven stitches. Because it was such an important game, Johnson was bandaged and medicated and returned to the game. The Alabama team fought back from an eleven-point deficit and cut the margin to two points with seconds to play. The plan was to get the ball to Betsy Harris to attempt a three-point play, but Harris stepped out of bounds. After a made free throw, they had one more chance with a three-point attempt but it failed, and La Tech moved on to the championship game. [2]

In the other semifinal game, the North Carolina team faced Purdue. North Carolina's Charlotte Smith was expected to be an important key to the game, and the Purdue coach, Lin Dunn, tried to prepare the team to handle Smith. That planning was ineffective, as Smith scored 23 points, and set a personal career records for assists with eight. The Purdue team was down 13 points in the first half, but fought back and managed to take a two-point lead in the second half. However, the Tar Heels switched to a zone defense after made baskets, and retook the lead, ending up with an 89–74 victory, and the first North Carolina team to make it to the Championship game. [3]

In addition to Charlotte Smith, North Carolina had a freshman guard Marion Jones who would later be known for world class performances in track and field. Jones picked up her third foul only six minutes in the game and had to sit. This "rattled" the North Carolina team but they kept the game close. When the game drew to a close, the La Tech team had a two-point advantage with less than a second on the clock, but North Carolina had the ball. With 0.7 seconds left, there was just enough time to catch and shoot. The ball was inbounded to Charlotte Smith who had made only eight three-pointers on 31 attempts during the season. Smith launched the ball, but never saw what happened as her vision was blocked. Her teammates mobbed her, and she realized she had hit the shot to complete one of the most dramatic finishes in NCAA Championship history. North Carolina won the Championship 60–59. [4] [5]

Tournament records

Qualifying teams – automatic

Sixty-four teams were selected to participate in the 1994 NCAA Tournament. Thirty-two conferences were eligible for an automatic bid to the 1994 NCAA tournament. [6]

Automatic bids
  Record 
Qualifying schoolConferenceRegular
season
ConferenceSeed
Bowling Green State University MAC 26–317–17
Brown University Ivy League 18–911–316
University of Connecticut Big East 27–217–11
Florida International University Trans America 25–311–18
Fordham University Patriot League 21–811–316
Georgia Southern University Southern Conference 21–811–214
Grambling State University SWAC 23–611–315
University of Wisconsin–Green Bay Mid-Continent 18–1013–515
Louisiana Tech University Sun Belt Conference 26–314–04
Loyola University Maryland MAAC 18–1012–214
University of Missouri Big Eight 12–173–1115
Missouri State University Missouri Valley Conference 23–515–16
University of Montana Big Sky Conference 24–412–27
Mount St. Mary's University Northeast Conference 25–318–014
NC A&T MEAC 19–1011–516
University of North Carolina ACC 27–214–23
University of Notre Dame Midwestern Collegiate 22–610–27
Old Dominion University Colonial 24–514–06
Pennsylvania State University Big Ten 25–216–21
University of Portland West Coast Conference 17–117–715
Radford University Big South Conference 18–1112–616
Rutgers University Atlantic 10 22–713–35
San Diego State University WAC 25–413–15
University of Southern California Pac-10 23–316–22
Stephen F. Austin State University Southland 23–616–28
University of Tennessee SEC 29–111–01
Tennessee State University Ohio Valley Conference 20–813–313
University of Texas at Austin Southwest 21–810–45
University of Alabama at Birmingham Great Midwest 23–512–010
University of Nevada, Las Vegas Big West Conference 23–614–410
University of Vermont North Atlantic Conference 19–109–513
Virginia Tech Metro 24–59–38

Qualifying teams – at-large

Thirty-two additional teams were selected to complete the sixty-four invitations. [6]

At-large bids
  Record 
Qualifying schoolConferenceRegular
season
ConferenceSeed
University of Alabama Southeastern22–67–46
Auburn University Southeastern19–96–59
Boise State University Big Sky23–512–29
Clemson University Atlantic Coast19–911–59
University of Colorado at Boulder Big Eight25–412–23
Creighton University Missouri Valley23–614–210
University of Florida Southeastern22–68–34
The George Washington University Atlantic 1022–713–37
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Big West25–416–212
Indiana University Big Ten19–810–812
University of Iowa Big Ten20–613–53
University of Kansas Big Eight21–511–39
Marquette University Great Midwest22–610–214
University of Minnesota Big Ten17–1010–810
University of Mississippi Southeastern23–87–45
Northern Illinois University Mid-Continent24–518–011
Oklahoma State University–Stillwater Big Eight20–89–512
University of Oregon Pacific-1019–813–56
Oregon State University Pacific-1017–109–911
Purdue University Big Ten25–416–21
Santa Clara University West Coast21–611–311
Seton Hall University Big East25–416–24
Southern Methodist University Southwest18–88–613
University of Southern Mississippi Metro24–410–24
Saint Joseph's University Atlantic 1019–811–511
Stanford University Pacific-1022–515–32
Texas A&M University Southwest21–711–313
Texas Tech University Southwest26–412–22
Vanderbilt University Southeastern23–79–22
University of Virginia Atlantic Coast25–415–13
University of Washington Pacific-1020–712–68
Western Kentucky University Sun Belt23–911–312

Bids by conference

Thirty-two conferences earned an automatic bid. In sixteen cases, the automatic bid was the only representative from the conference. Thirty-two additional at-large teams were selected from sixteen of the conferences. [6]

BidsConferenceTeams
6 Southeastern Tennessee, Alabama, Auburn, Florida, Ole Miss, Vanderbilt
5 Big Ten Penn St., Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Purdue
5 Pacific-10 Southern California, Oregon, Oregon St., Stanford, Washington
4 Big Eight Missouri, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma St.
4 Southwest Texas, SMU, Texas A&M, Texas Tech
3 Atlantic 10 Rutgers, George Washington, St. Joseph's
3 Atlantic Coast North Carolina, Clemson, Virginia
2 Big East Connecticut, Seton Hall
2 Big Sky Montana, Boise St.
2 Big West UNLV, Hawaii
2 Great Midwest UAB, Marquette
2 Metro Virginia Tech, Southern Miss.
2 Mid-Continent Green Bay, Northern Ill.
2 Missouri Valley Missouri St., Creighton
2 Sun Belt Louisiana Tech, Western Ky.
2 West Coast Portland, Santa Clara
1 Big South Radford
1 Colonial Old Dominion
1 Ivy Brown
1 Metro Atlantic Loyola Md.
1 Mid-American Bowling Green
1 Mid-Eastern N.C. A&T
1 Midwestern Notre Dame
1 North Atlantic Vermont
1 Northeast Mt. St. Mary's
1 Ohio Valley Tennessee St.
1 Patriot Fordham
1 Southern Ga. Southern
1 Southland Stephen F. Austin
1 Southwestern Grambling
1 Trans America FIU
1 Western Athletic San Diego St.

Bids by state

The sixty-four teams came from thirty-six states, plus Washington, D.C. Texas had the most teams with five bids. Fourteen states did not have any teams receiving bids. [6]

NCAA women's basketball tournament invitations by state 1994 NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 1994.svg
NCAA women's basketball tournament invitations by state 1994
BidsStateTeams
5 Texas Stephen F. Austin, Texas, SMU, Texas A&M, Texas Tech
4 California San Diego St., Southern California, Santa Clara, Stanford
4 Virginia Old Dominion, Radford, Virginia Tech, Virginia
3 Alabama UAB, Alabama, Auburn
3 Indiana Notre Dame, Indiana, Purdue
3 Oregon Portland, Oregon, Oregon St.
3 Tennessee Tennessee, Tennessee St., Vanderbilt
2 Florida FIU, Florida
2 Louisiana Grambling, Louisiana Tech
2 Maryland Loyola Md., Mt. St. Mary's
2 Mississippi Ole Miss, Southern Miss.
2 Missouri Missouri, Missouri St.
2 New Jersey Rutgers, Seton Hall
2 North Carolina N.C. A&T, North Carolina
2 Pennsylvania Penn St., St. Joseph's
2 Wisconsin Green Bay, Marquette
1 Colorado Colorado
1 Connecticut Connecticut
1 District of Columbia George Washington
1 Georgia Ga. Southern
1 Hawaii Hawaii
1 Idaho Boise St.
1 Illinois Northern Ill.
1 Iowa Iowa
1 Kansas Kansas
1 Kentucky Western Ky.
1 Minnesota Minnesota
1 Montana Montana
1 Nebraska Creighton
1 Nevada UNLV
1 New York Fordham
1 Ohio Bowling Green
1 Oklahoma Oklahoma St.
1 Rhode Island Brown
1 South Carolina Clemson
1 Vermont Vermont
1 Washington Washington

Brackets

First- and second-round games played at higher seed except where noted.

East Region

First round
March 13 and 14

Higher seed's home court

Second round
March 15 and 16

Higher seed's home court

Regional semifinals
March 21

Piscataway, NJ

Regional finals
March 23

Piscataway, NJ

            
1 Connecticut 79
16 Brown 60
1 Connecticut81
9 Auburn 59
8 Virginia Tech 51
9 Auburn 60
1 Connecticut78
4 Southern Mississippi 64
5 Rutgers 73
12 Western Kentucky 84
12 Western Kentucky 69
4 Southern Mississippi72
4 Southern Mississippi 86
13 Tennessee State 72
1 Connecticut 69
3 North Carolina81
6 Old Dominion 56
11 Saint Joseph's 55
6 Old Dominion 52
3 North Carolina63
3 North Carolina 101
14 Georgia Southern 53
3 North Carolina73
2 Vanderbilt 69
7 Notre Dame 76
10 Minnesota 81
10 Minnesota 72
2 Vanderbilt98
2 Vanderbilt 95
15 Grambling State 85

Mideast Region

First round
March 12 and 13

Higher seed's home court

Second round
March 14 and 15

Higher seed's home court

Regional semifinals
March 21

Fayetteville, AR

Regional finals
March 23

Fayetteville, AR

            
1 Tennessee 111
16 North Carolina A&T 37
1 Tennessee78
9 Clemson 66
8 Florida International 64
9 Clemson 65
1 Tennessee 68
4 Louisiana Tech71
5 Ole Miss 83
12 Indiana 61
5 Ole Miss 67
4 Louisiana Tech82
4 Louisiana Tech 96
13 SMU 62
4 Louisiana Tech75
2 Southern California 66
6 SW Missouri State 75
11 Northern Illinois 56
6 SW Missouri St. 63
3 Virginia67
3 Virginia 72
14 Loyola-MD 47
3 Virginia 66
2 Southern California85
7 George Washington 74
10 UAB 66
7 George Washington 72
2 Southern California76
2 Southern California 77
15 Portland 62

Midwest Region

First round
March 12 and 13

Higher seed's home court

Second round
March 14 and 15

Higher seed's home court

Regional semifinals
March 20

Austin, Texas

Regional finals
March 22

Austin, Texas

            
1 Penn State 94
16 Fordham 41
1 Penn State85
9 Kansas 68
8 Stephen F. Austin 62
9 Kansas 72
1 Penn State64
4 Seton Hall 60
5 Texas 75
12 Oklahoma State 67
5 Texas 66
4 Seton Hall71
4 Seton Hall 70
13 Vermont 60
1 Penn State 82
6 Alabama96
6 Alabama 96
11 Oregon State 86
6 Alabama84
3 Iowa 78
3 Iowa 70
14 Mount St. Mary's 47
6 Alabama73
2 Texas Tech 68
7 Bowling Green 73
10 Creighton 84
10 Creighton 65
2 Texas Tech75
2 Texas Tech 75
15 Missouri 61

West Region

First round
March 16

Higher seed's home court

Second round
March 19 and 20

Higher seed's home court

Regional semifinals
March 24

Stanford, CA

Regional finals
March 26

Stanford, CA

            
1 Purdue 103
16 Radford 56
1 Purdue86
8 Washington 59
8 Washington 89
9 Boise State 61
1 Purdue82
13 Texas A&M 56
5 San Diego State 81
12 Hawaiʻi 75
5 San Diego State 72
13 Texas A&M75
4 Florida 76
13 at Texas A&M 78
1 Purdue82
2 Stanford 65
6 Oregon 74
11 Santa Clara 59
6 Oregon 71
3 Colorado92
3 Colorado 77
14 Marquette 74
3 Colorado 62
2 Stanford78
7 Montana 77
10 UNLV 67
7 Montana 62
2 Stanford66
2 Stanford 81
15 Green Bay 56

Final Four – Richmond, Virginia

National semifinals
April 2
National championship
April 3
      
3E North Carolina89
1W Purdue 74
3E North Carolina60
4ME Louisiana Tech 59
4ME Louisiana Tech69
6MW Alabama 66

E-East; ME-Mideast; MW-Midwest; W-West.

Record by conference

Eighteen conferences had more than one bid, or at least one win in NCAA Tournament play: [6]

Conference# of BidsRecordWin %Round
of 32
Sweet
Sixteen
Elite
Eight
Final
Four
Championship
Game
Southeastern 6 10–6.625 5 3 1 1
Big Ten 5 9–5.643 4 2 2 1
Pacific-10 5 8–5.615 4 2 2
Southwest 4 5–4.556 3 2
Big Eight 4 3–4.429 2 1
Atlantic Coast 3 9–2.818 3 2 1 1 1
Atlantic 10 3 1–3.250 1
Sun Belt 2 6–2.750 2 1 1 1 1
Big East 2 5–2.714 2 2 1
Metro 2 2–2.500 1 1
Missouri Valley 2 2–2.500 2
Big Sky 2 1–2.333 1
Big West 2 0–2
Great Midwest 2 0–2
Mid-Continent 2 0–2
West Coast 2 0–2
Colonial 1 1–1.500 1
Western Athletic 1 1–1.500 1

Fourteen conferences went 0-1: Big South Conference, Ivy League, MAAC, MAC, MEAC, Midwestern Collegiate, North Atlantic Conference, Northeast Conference, Ohio Valley Conference, Patriot League, Southern Conference, Southland, SWAC, and Trans America. [6]

All-Tournament team

Game officials

See also

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References

  1. Gregory Cooper. "1994 NCAA National Championship Tournament". Archived from the original on 2009-10-20. Retrieved 2008-03-29.
  2. 1 2 Deardorff, Julie (April 3, 1994). "La. Tech Has Overcome A Cold, Gloomy December". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  3. Kent, Milton (April 3, 1994). "North Carolina races past Purdue to final". Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  4. Anderson, Kelli (November 28, 1994). "A Key Performer". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  5. Anderson, Kelli (April 11, 1994). "Beat The Clock". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Nixon, Rick. "Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 22 April 2012.
  7. "Championship records remembered". NCAA. Archived from the original on 1 December 2017. Retrieved 22 Sep 2012.