1995–96 FA Premier League

Last updated

FA Premier League
Season1995 (1995)–96
Dates19 August 1995 – 05 May 1996
Champions Manchester United
3rd Premier League title
10th English title
Relegated Manchester City
Queens Park Rangers
Bolton Wanderers
Champions League Manchester United
Cup Winners' Cup Liverpool
UEFA Cup Newcastle United
Aston Villa
Arsenal
Matches played380
Goals scored988 (2.6 per match)
Top goalscorer Alan Shearer (31 goals)
Biggest home win Blackburn Rovers 7–0 Nottingham Forest
(18 November 1995)
Biggest away win Bolton Wanderers 0–6 Manchester United
(25 February 1996)
Highest scoring Sheffield Wednesday 6–2 Leeds United
(16 December 1995)
Longest winning run6 games [1]
Manchester United
Longest unbeaten run15 games [1]
Liverpool
Longest winless run14 games [1]
Coventry City
Wimbledon
Longest losing run8 games [1]
Manchester City
Middlesbrough
Highest attendance53,926 [2]
Manchester United v Nottingham Forest
(28 April 1996)
Lowest attendance6,352 [2]
Wimbledon v Sheffield Wednesday
(30 August 1995)
1996–97

The 1995–96 FA Premier League (known as the FA Carling Premiership for sponsorship reasons) was the fourth season of the competition, since its formation in 1992. Due to the decision to reduce the number of clubs in the Premier League from 22 to 20, only two clubs were promoted instead of the usual three, Middlesbrough and Bolton Wanderers. [3]

Contents

Manchester United won the Premier League and qualified for the UEFA Champions League, while Arsenal, Aston Villa, and Newcastle United qualified for the UEFA Cup. Liverpool also qualified for the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup as runners-up of the FA Cup which was won by Manchester United.

Summary

Liverpool and Aston Villa emerged as possible title contenders early in the season, while Middlesbrough's early promise saw them occupy fourth place in late October, but an injury crisis saw their league form slump, and they could only manage a 12th-place finish. Most of the campaign was a two-horse race between Manchester United and Newcastle United. The two sides played on 27 December, with Newcastle 10 points ahead in the league. A 2–0 home win for Manchester United cut the gap to seven points, and two days later they beat Queens Park Rangers 2–1 to reduce the gap to just four points. But a 4–1 defeat at Tottenham on New Year's Day and a 0–0 draw with Aston Villa allowed Newcastle to establish a 12-point lead in January.

Manchester United and Newcastle met again in early March, and a goal by Eric Cantona gave Manchester United a 1–0 away win and cut the gap to a single point. With one game left of the season, Manchester United led the Premier League by two points, having taken lead of the league halfway through March and stayed on top ever since. In case of the two clubs being tied for first place, the Premier League made preliminary preparations for a championship play-off match at Wembley. [4] For Newcastle to win their first title since 1927, they had to win against Tottenham and hope that Middlesbrough beat their Mancunian rivals. But the Premier League title went to Old Trafford as Manchester United won 3–0 and Newcastle could only manage a 1–1 draw with Tottenham.

Despite the arrival of Dennis Bergkamp, Arsenal never looked like serious title challengers, their best chance of success coming in the League Cup, where they reached the semi-finals, losing on away goals to Aston Villa. However, the North London side still qualified for the UEFA Cup by finishing fifth.

Aston Villa won the Coca Cola sponsored League Cup competition this season, beating Leeds United 3-0 at Wembley.

Title holders Blackburn recorded the lowest ever finish by a Premier League title-holder by finishing 7th. This record was matched by Manchester United in 2013–14 and broken by Chelsea in 2015–16 and again by Leicester City in 2016–17.

Six days after clinching their third league title in four seasons, Manchester United became the first team to complete a second league championship and FA Cup double when a Cantona goal gave them a 1–0 win over Liverpool in the FA Cup final. [5]

The Premier League relegation places went to Bolton, Queens Park Rangers and Manchester City. Bolton had spent a large proportion of their first Premier League season bottom of the table. Manchester City failed to beat Liverpool on the final day of the season, consigning them to the final relegation place on goal difference behind Southampton and Coventry City.

English performance in European competition

Blackburn Rovers, the 1994–95 Premier League champions, finished bottom of their group in the UEFA Champions League. [6] Manchester United were knocked out of the UEFA Cup in the first round, with Liverpool and Leeds United both being knocked out at the second round. [7] Everton were beaten in the second round of the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup. [8] The only English team still in European competition after Christmas were Nottingham Forest, who reached the quarter-finals of the UEFA Cup. [7]

Teams

Twenty teams competed in the league – the top eighteen teams from the previous season and the two teams promoted from the First Division. The promoted teams were Middlesbrough and Bolton Wanderers, returning to the top flight after two and fifteen years respectively. This was also Bolton Wanderers' first season in the Premier League. They replaced Crystal Palace, Norwich City, Leicester City and Ipswich Town, ending their top flight spells of one, nine, one and three years respectively.

Stadiums and Locations

Greater London UK location map 2.svg
Greater London Premier League football clubs
Greater Manchester UK location map 2.svg
Greater Manchester Premier League football clubs
TeamLocationStadiumCapacity
Arsenal London (Highbury) Arsenal Stadium 38,419
Aston Villa Birmingham Villa Park 39,399
Blackburn Rovers Blackburn Ewood Park 31,367
Bolton Wanderers Bolton Burnden Park 25,000
Chelsea London (Fulham) Stamford Bridge 36,000
Coventry City Coventry Highfield Road 23,489
Everton Liverpool (Walton) Goodison Park 40,157
Leeds United Leeds Elland Road 40,204
Liverpool Liverpool (Anfield) Anfield 42,730
Manchester City Manchester Maine Road 35,150
Manchester United Old Trafford Old Trafford 55,314
Middlesbrough Middlesbrough Riverside Stadium 30,000
Newcastle United Newcastle upon Tyne St James' Park 36,649
Nottingham Forest West Bridgford City Ground 30,539
Queens Park Rangers London (Shepherd's Bush) Loftus Road 18,439
Sheffield Wednesday Sheffield Hillsborough Stadium 39,859
Southampton Southampton The Dell 15,200
Tottenham Hotspur London (Tottenham) White Hart Lane 36,230
West Ham United London (Upton Park) Boleyn Ground 28,000
Wimbledon London (Wimbledon) Selhurst Park [lower-alpha 1] 26,309
  1. Due to Wimbledon lacking a home stadium, they played their home games at Selhurst Park, which is the home stadium of Crystal Palace.

Personnel and kits

(as of 5 May 1996)

TeamManagerCaptainKit manufacturerShirt sponsor
Arsenal Flag of Scotland.svg Bruce Rioch Flag of England.svg Tony Adams Nike JVC
Aston Villa Flag of England.svg Brian Little Flag of Ireland.svg Andy Townsend Reebok AST Research
Blackburn Rovers Flag of England.svg Ray Harford Flag of England.svg Tim Sherwood Asics CIS
Bolton Wanderers Flag of England.svg Colin Todd Flag of England.svg Alan Stubbs ReebokReebok
Chelsea Flag of England.svg Glenn Hoddle Flag of England.svg Dennis Wise Umbro Coors
Coventry City Flag of England.svg Ron Atkinson Flag of England.svg Brian Borrows Pony Peugeot
Everton Flag of England.svg Joe Royle Flag of England.svg Dave Watson UmbroDanka
Leeds United Flag of England.svg Howard Wilkinson Flag of Scotland.svg Gary McAllister Asics Thistle Hotels
Liverpool Flag of England.svg Roy Evans Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ian Rush Adidas Carlsberg
Manchester City Flag of England.svg Alan Ball Flag of England.svg Keith Curle Umbro Brother
Manchester United Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Ferguson Flag of England.svg Steve Bruce Umbro Sharp
Middlesbrough Flag of England.svg Bryan Robson Flag of England.svg Nigel Pearson Erreà Cellnet
Newcastle United Flag of England.svg Kevin Keegan Flag of England.svg Peter Beardsley Adidas Newcastle Brown Ale
Nottingham Forest Flag of England.svg Frank Clark Flag of England.svg Stuart Pearce Umbro Labatt's
Queens Park Rangers Flag of England.svg Ray Wilkins Flag of England.svg David Bardsley View From Compaq
Sheffield Wednesday Flag of England.svg David Pleat Flag of England.svg Peter Atherton Puma Sanderson
Southampton Flag of England.svg Dave Merrington Flag of England.svg Matt Le Tissier PonySanderson
Tottenham Hotspur Flag of England.svg Gerry Francis Flag of England.svg Gary Mabbutt Pony Hewlett-Packard
West Ham United Flag of England.svg Harry Redknapp Flag of England.svg Steve Potts PonyDagenham Motors
Wimbledon Flag of Ireland.svg Joe Kinnear Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Vinnie Jones Core Elonex

Managerial changes

TeamOutgoing managerManner of departureDate of vacancyPosition in tableIncoming managerDate of appointment
Manchester City Flag of England.svg Brian Horton Sacked16 May 1995Pre-season Flag of England.svg Alan Ball 2 July 1995
Sheffield Wednesday Flag of England.svg Trevor Francis 20 May 1995 Flag of England.svg David Pleat 14 June 1995 [9]
Arsenal Flag of Scotland.svg Stewart Houston End of caretaker spell8 June 1995 Flag of Scotland.svg Bruce Rioch 8 June 1995
Bolton Wanderers Flag of Scotland.svg Bruce Rioch Signed by Arsenal Flag of England.svg Roy McFarland
Flag of England.svg Colin Todd [lower-alpha 1]
20 June 1995
Blackburn Rovers Flag of Scotland.svg Kenny Dalglish Retired25 June 1995 Flag of England.svg Ray Harford 25 June 1995
Southampton Flag of England.svg Alan Ball Signed by Manchester City2 July 1995 Flag of England.svg David Merrington 14 July 1995
Bolton Wanderers Flag of England.svg Roy McFarland Sacked2 January 199620th Flag of England.svg Colin Todd [lower-alpha 2] 2 January 1996
  1. McFarland and Todd were co-managers.
  2. Assumed full managerial duties.

League table

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification or relegation
1 Manchester United (C)3825767335+3882Qualification for the Champions League group stage
2 Newcastle United 3824686637+2978Qualification for the UEFA Cup first round
3 Liverpool 38201177034+3671Qualification for the Cup Winners' Cup first round [lower-alpha 1]
4 Aston Villa 38189115235+1763Qualification for the UEFA Cup first round
5 Arsenal 38171294932+1763
6 Everton 381710116444+2061
7 Blackburn Rovers 38187136147+1461
8 Tottenham Hotspur 38161395038+1261
9 Nottingham Forest 381513105054458
10 West Ham United 38149154352951
11 Chelsea 381214124644+250
12 Middlesbrough 3811101735501543
13 Leeds United 381271940571743
14 Wimbledon 3810111755701541
15 Sheffield Wednesday 3810101848611340
16 Coventry City 388141642601838
17 Southampton 389111834521838
18 Manchester City (R)389111833582538Relegation to the Football League First Division
19 Queens Park Rangers (R)38962338571933
20 Bolton Wanderers (R)38852539713229
Source: Premier League
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated
Notes:
  1. Liverpool qualified for the Cup Winners' Cup as FA Cup runners-up, as winners Manchester United already qualified for the Champions League. They defaulted their UEFA Cup spot from league position to Arsenal.

Results

Home \ Away ARS AVL BLB BOL CHE COV EVE LEE LIV MCI MUN MID NEW NFO QPR SHW SOU TOT WHU WIM
Arsenal 2–00–02–1 1–1 1–11–22–10–03–1 1–0 1–12–01–13–04–24–2 0–0 1–01–3
Aston Villa 1–12–01–00–14–11–03–00–20–13–10–01–11–14–23–23–02–11–12–0
Blackburn Rovers 1–11–13–13–05–10–31–02–32–01–21–02–17–01–03–02–12–14–23–2
Bolton Wanderers 1–00–22–12–11–21–10–20–11–10–61–11–31–10–12–10–12–30–31–0
Chelsea 1–0 1–22–33–22–20–0 4–1 2–21–11–45–01–01–01–10–03–00–01–21–2
Coventry City 0–00–35–00–21–02–10–01–02–10–40–00–11–11–00–11–12–32–23–3
Everton 0–21–01–03–01–12–22–01–12–02–34–01–33–02–02–22–01–13–02–4
Leeds United 0–32–00–00–1 1–0 3–12–21–00–13–10–10–11–31–32–01–01–32–01–1
Liverpool 3–13–03–05–22–00–01–25–06–02–01–0 4–3 4–21–01–01–10–02–02–2
Manchester City 0–11–01–11–00–11–10–20–02–22–30–13–31–12–01–02–11–12–11–0
Manchester United 1–0 0–01–03–01–11–02–01–02–21–02–02–05–02–12–24–11–02–13–1
Middlesbrough 2–30–22–01–42–02–10–21–12–14–10–31–21–11–03–10–00–14–21–2
Newcastle United 2–01–01–02–12–03–01–02–12–13–10–11–03–12–12–01–01–13–06–1
Nottingham Forest 0–11–11–53–20–00–03–22–11–03–01–11–01–13–01–01–02–11–14–1
Queens Park Rangers 1–11–00–12–11–21–13–11–21–21–01–11–12–31–10–33–02–33–00–3
Sheffield Wednesday 1–02–02–14–20–04–32–56–21–11–10–00–10–21–31–32–21–30–12–1
Southampton 0–00–11–01–02–31–02–21–11–31–13–12–11–03–42–00–10–00–00–0
Tottenham Hotspur 2–1 0–12–32–21–13–10–02–11–31–04–11–11–10–11–01–01–00–13–1
West Ham United 0–11–41–11–01–33–22–11–20–04–20–12–02–01–01–01–12–11–11–1
Wimbledon 0–33–31–13–21–10–22–32–41–03–02–40–03–31–02–12–21–20–10–1
Source: [ citation needed ]
Legend: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.

Season statistics

Scoring

Top scorers

Blackburn's Alan Shearer was the top scorer for the second time, with 31 goals. Alan Shearer 2008.jpg
Blackburn's Alan Shearer was the top scorer for the second time, with 31 goals.
RankPlayerClubGoals
1 Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn Rovers31
2 Flag of England.svg Robbie Fowler Liverpool28
3 Flag of England.svg Les Ferdinand Newcastle United25
4 Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Dwight Yorke Aston Villa17
5 Flag of England.svg Teddy Sheringham Tottenham Hotspur16
6 Flag of England.svg Chris Armstrong Tottenham Hotspur15
Flag of Russia.svg Andrei Kanchelskis Everton15
Flag of England.svg Ian Wright Arsenal15
9 Flag of France.svg Eric Cantona Manchester United14
Flag of England.svg Stan Collymore Liverpool14
Flag of England.svg Dion Dublin Coventry City14

Hat-tricks

Serbian Savo Milosevic is the only player to score a hat-trick while representing the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia national football team. Savo-milosevic-2009-ds.jpg
Serbian Savo Milošević is the only player to score a hat-trick while representing the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia national football team.
PlayerForAgainstResultDateRef
Flag of England.svg Matt Le Tissier SouthamptonNottingham Forest3–4 (A)15 August 1995 [10]
Flag of England.svg Robbie Fowler 4LiverpoolBolton Wanderers5–2 (H)23 August 1995 [11]
Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn RoversCoventry City5–1 (H)23 August 1995 [12]
Flag of Ghana.svg Tony Yeboah Leeds UnitedWimbledon4–2 (H)23 August 1995 [13]
Flag of England.svg Les Ferdinand Newcastle UnitedWimbledon6–1 (H)21 October 1995 [14]
Flag of Scotland.svg Gary McAllister Leeds UnitedCoventry City3–1 (H)28 October 1995 [15]
Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn RoversNottingham Forest7–0 (H)18 November 1995 [16]
Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn RoversWest Ham United4–2 (H)2 December 1995 [17]
Flag of England.svg Dion Dublin Coventry CitySheffield Wednesday4–3 (A)4 December 1995 [18]
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Savo Milošević Aston VillaCoventry City4–1 (H)16 December 1995 [19]
Flag of England.svg Robbie Fowler LiverpoolArsenal3–1 (H)23 December 1995 [20]
Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn RoversBolton Wanderers3–1 (H)3 February 1996 [21]
Flag of England.svg Gavin Peacock ChelseaMiddlesbrough5–0 (H)4 February 1996 [22]
Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Blackburn RoversTottenham Hotspur3–2 (A)16 March 1996 [23]
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Mark Hughes ChelseaLeeds United4–1 (H)13 April 1996 [24]
Flag of Russia.svg Andrei Kanchelskis EvertonSheffield Wednesday5–2 (A)27 April 1996 [25]
Note:4 Player scored 4 goals; (H) – Home; (A) – Away

Top assists

Liverpool's Steve McManaman assisted 15 goals for the club in the 1995-96 Premier League season. Steve McManaman 2009.jpg
Liverpool's Steve McManaman assisted 15 goals for the club in the 1995–96 Premier League season.
RankPlayerClubAssists [26]
1 Flag of England.svg Steve McManaman Liverpool15
2 Flag of England.svg Darren Anderton Tottenham Hotspur11
3 Flag of England.svg John Barnes Liverpool10
Flag of France.svg Eric Cantona Manchester United
Flag of England.svg Ian Woan Nottingham Forest
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Dwight Yorke Aston Villa
7 Flag of England.svg Peter Beardsley Newcastle United9
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ryan Giggs Manchester United
Flag of England.svg Mike Newell Blackburn Rovers
Flag of England.svg Stuart Ripley Blackburn Rovers

Awards

Monthly awards

Liverpool's Robbie Fowler became the first player to win the Player of the Month award in consecutive months. Robbie Fowler.jpg
Liverpool's Robbie Fowler became the first player to win the Player of the Month award in consecutive months.
Month Manager of the Month Player of the Month
ManagerClubPlayerClub
August Flag of England.svg Kevin Keegan [27] Newcastle United Flag of France.svg David Ginola [27] Newcastle United
September Flag of Ghana.svg Tony Yeboah [27] Leeds United
October Flag of England.svg Frank Clark [27] Nottingham Forest Flag of England.svg Trevor Sinclair [27] Queens Park Rangers
November Flag of England.svg Alan Ball [27] Manchester City Flag of England.svg Rob Lee [27] Newcastle United
December Flag of England.svg Roy Evans [27] Liverpool Flag of England.svg Robbie Fowler [27] Liverpool
January Flag of England.svg Stan Collymore [27] Liverpool
Flag of England.svg Robbie Fowler [27]
February Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Ferguson [27] Manchester United Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Dwight Yorke [27] Aston Villa
March Flag of France.svg Eric Cantona [27] Manchester United
April Flag of England.svg Dave Merrington [27] Southampton Flag of Russia.svg Andrei Kanchelskis [27] Everton

Annual awards

AwardWinnerClub
Premier League Manager of the Season Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Ferguson Manchester United
PFA Players' Player of the Year Flag of England.svg Les Ferdinand [28] Newcastle United
PFA Young Player of the Year Flag of England.svg Robbie Fowler [29] Liverpool
FWA Footballer of the Year Flag of France.svg Eric Cantona [30] Manchester United
PFA Team of the Year
Goalkeeper Flag of England.svg David James (Liverpool)
Defence Flag of England.svg Gary Neville (Manchester United) Flag of England.svg Tony Adams (Arsenal) Flag of England.svg Ugo Ehiogu (Aston Villa) Flag of England.svg Alan Wright (Aston Villa)
Midfield Flag of England.svg Steve Stone (Nottingham Forest) Flag of England.svg Rob Lee (Newcastle United) Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ruud Gullit (Chelsea) Flag of France.svg David Ginola (Newcastle United)
Attack Flag of England.svg Les Ferdinand (Newcastle United) Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer (Blackburn Rovers)

See also

References and notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 "English Premier League 1995–96". statto.com. Archived from the original on 19 February 2015. Retrieved 19 February 2015.
  2. 1 2 "Premier League 1995/96 Attendances". worldfootball.net. Retrieved 27 May 2015.
  3. England 1994/95
  4. "Arsenal and Chelsea may face play-off". premierleague.com. Premier League. 15 May 2013. Archived from the original on 17 June 2015. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
  5. England – FA Challenge Cup 1995–1996
  6. European Competitions 1995–96 Archived 15 January 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  7. 1 2 European Competitions 1995–96
  8. European Competitions 1995–96
  9. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 16 September 2008. Retrieved 22 July 2008.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. Hey, Stan (20 August 1995). "Roy runs free for Forest". The Independent. London. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  11. "Liverpool 5–2 Bolton Wanderers". Soccerbase. Archived from the original on 21 May 2005. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  12. Culley, Jon (24 September 1995). "Shearer lifts the gloom". The Independent. London. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  13. Brenkley, Stephen (24 September 1995). "Yeboah up to his old tricks". The Independent. London. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  14. Barnes, Scott (22 October 1995). "Ferdinand dons triple crown". The Independent. London. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  15. Barnes, Scott (29 October 1995). "Leeds stirred by McAllister". The Independent. London. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  16. Hadfield, Dave (19 November 1995). "Bohinen busts Forest's dam". The Independent. London. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  17. Cullely, Jon (3 December 1995). "Shearer bliss". The Independent. London. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  18. Hodgson, Guy (5 December 1995). "Football: Bright's finish makes Dublin's hat-trick irrelevant". The Independent. London. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  19. Shaw, Phil (17 December 1995). "Football: Milosevic finally comes good". The Independent. London. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  20. Fox, Norman (24 December 1995). "Fowler does trick for Liverpool". The Independent. London. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  21. Hadfield, Dave (4 February 1996). "Dogged Shearer puts bite on Bolton". The Independent. London. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  22. Moore, Glenn (5 February 1996). "Chelsea burst into bloom". The Independent. London. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  23. Haylett, Trevor (14 April 1996). "Shearer steals show". The Independent. London. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  24. Brown, Geoff (14 April 1996). "Hughes bang up to date". The Independent. London. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  25. Barnes, Scott (28 April 1996). "Kanchelskis rules". The Independent. London. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  26. "Statistical Leaders – 1996". Premier League. Archived from the original on 24 June 2017. Retrieved 5 May 2018.
  27. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 "Carling Premiership Player of the Month 1995/96". Premier League. Archived from the original on 10 December 2006.
  28. England Player Honours – Professional Footballers' Association Players' Players of the Year
  29. England Player Honours – Professional Footballers' Association Young Players of the Year
  30. England Player Honours – Football Writers' Association Footballers of the Year

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