1995–96 New York Knicks season

Last updated
1995–96   New York Knicks season
Head coach Don Nelson
Jeff Van Gundy
General manager Ernie Grunfeld
Owners ITT
Cablevision
Arena Madison Square Garden
Results
Record4735 (.573)
PlaceDivision: 2nd (Atlantic)
Conference: 4th (Eastern)
Playoff finish East Conference Semifinals
(Lost to Bulls 1–4)

Stats @ Basketball-Reference.com
Local media
Television MSG Network
Radio WFAN
< 1994–95 1996–97 >

The 1995–96 NBA season was the 50th season for the Knicks in the National Basketball Association in New York City, New York. [1] After Pat Riley left to coach the Miami Heat, the Knicks hired Don Nelson (their "Plan B" after Chuck Daly rejected their offer) [2] and won ten of their first twelve games. [3] However, the team never seemed to get under Nelson down the stretch, as he was replaced by long time assistant Jeff Van Gundy after 59 games. [4] At midseason, the Knicks traded Charles D. Smith to the San Antonio Spurs for J.R. Reid, [5] and dealt Doug Christie to the expansion Toronto Raptors for Willie Anderson. [6] Under Van Gundy, the Knicks finished the season playing around .500 to post a 47–35 record, second in the Atlantic Division, with Patrick Ewing being selected for the 1996 NBA All-Star Game.

Contents

In the first round of the playoffs, the Knicks swept the 4th-seeded Cleveland Cavaliers in three straight games. However, they would lose four games to one to the Chicago Bulls in the semifinals. Following the season, Anthony Mason was traded to the Charlotte Hornets, [7] Derek Harper re-signed as a free agent with the Dallas Mavericks, [8] Hubert Davis was traded to the Toronto Raptors, [9] and Reid and Anderson were both released. [10]

For the season, the Knicks added the "New York" script to their logo. They also had new alternate uniforms, which they wore on the road so often, that they would become their primary road jerseys for the 1997–98 season.

Offseason

NBA Draft

The Knicks had no draft picks for 1995.

Roster

Roster listing
New York Knicks roster
PlayersCoaches
Pos.No.NameHeightWeightDOB (YYYY-MM-DD)From
SG 40 Flag of the United States.svg Anderson, Willie 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)190 lb (86 kg) Georgia
SG 44 Flag of the United States.svg Davis, Hubert 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)183 lb (83 kg) North Carolina
C 33 Flag of the United States.svg Ewing, Patrick 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m)240 lb (109 kg) Georgetown
PF 20 Flag of the United States.svg Grandison, Ron 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)215 lb (98 kg) New Orleans
PG 23 Flag of the United States.svg Grant, Gary 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)185 lb (84 kg) Michigan
PG 11 Flag of the United States.svg Harper, Derek 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)185 lb (84 kg) Illinois
PF 54 Flag of the United States.svg Lohaus, Brad 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m)230 lb (104 kg) Iowa
SF 14 Flag of the United States.svg Mason, Anthony 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)250 lb (113 kg) Tennessee State
PF 34 Flag of the United States.svg Oakley, Charles 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)225 lb (102 kg) Virginia Union
PF 7 Flag of the United States.svg Reid, J. R. 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)247 lb (112 kg) North Carolina
SG 3 Flag of the United States.svg Starks, John 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)180 lb (82 kg) Oklahoma State
SF Flag of the United States.svg Tucker, Anthony  Cruz Roja.svg (IN)6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)229 lb (104 kg) Wake Forest
PG 21 Flag of the United States.svg Ward, Charlie 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)190 lb (86 kg) Florida State
C 32 Flag of the United States.svg Williams, Herb 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m)242 lb (110 kg) Ohio State
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (DP) Unsigned draft pick
  • (FA) Free agent
  • (S) Suspended
  • Cruz Roja.svg Injured

Roster

Roster Notes

Regular season

Season standings

Atlantic Division WLPCTGBHomeRoadDivGP
y-Orlando Magic 6022.73212.037–423–1821–382
x-New York Knicks 4735.57325.026–1521–2016–882
x-Miami Heat 4240.51230.026–1516–2513–1282
Washington Bullets 3943.47633.025–1614–2710–1482
Boston Celtics 3349.40239.018–2315–2612–1282
New Jersey Nets 3052.36642.020–2110–318–1782
Philadelphia 76ers 1864.22054.011–307–345–1982
Eastern Conference
#TeamWLPCTGBGP
1z-Chicago Bulls *7210.87882
2y-Orlando Magic *6022.73212.082
3x-Indiana Pacers 5230.63420.082
4x-Cleveland Cavaliers 5131.62221.082
5x-New York Knicks 4735.57325.082
6x-Atlanta Hawks 4636.56126.082
7x-Detroit Pistons 4636.56126.082
8x-Miami Heat 4240.51230.082
9 Charlotte Hornets 4141.50031.082
10 Washington Bullets 3943.47633.082
11 Boston Celtics 3349.40239.082
12 New Jersey Nets 3052.36642.082
13 Milwaukee Bucks 2557.30547.082
14 Toronto Raptors 2161.25651.082
15 Philadelphia 76ers 1864.22054.082

Record vs. opponents

1995-96 NBA Records
TeamATLBOSCHACHICLEDALDENDETGSWHOUINDLACLALMIAMILMINNJNNYKORLPHIPHOPORSACSASSEATORUTAVANWAS
Atlanta 4–03–10–43–11–11–12–21–11–11–32–00–22–22–21–14–02–12–22–10–22–02–00–20–24–01–12–01–3
Boston 0–42–20–31–30–21–12–10–21–10–42–00–23–13–12–02–20–41–34–01–10–22–00–20–23–10–21–12–2
Charlotte 1–32–21–33–12–02–01–30–20–21–31–12–02–23–11–10–33–00–43–12–01–11–10–20–23–11–12–03–1
Chicago 4–03–03–14–02–01–14–02–02–02–22–02–03–14–02–03–03–13–14–01–12–02–02–01–13–12–02–04–0
Cleveland 1–33–11–30–42–01–12–22–01–12–22–02–01–34–02–01–23–11–24–02–01–11–10–20–23–10–22–03–1
Dallas 1–12–00–20–20–22–20–22–21–30–22–20–40–21–10–41–10–21–10–21–30–42–22–22–21–11–34–00–2
Denver 1–11–10–21–11–12–21–12–21–30–21–32–20–21–14–00–21–11–12–03–10–40–40–41–32–03–13–11–1
Detroit 2–21–23–10–42–22–01–12–01–12–22–00–21–32–21–14–00–41–34–02–02–01–12–01–14–00–22–01–2
Golden State 1–12–02–00–20–22–22–20–22–21–13–11–31–11–13–12–00–20–22–01–31–31–31–30–41–11–34–01–1
Houston 1–11–12–00–21–13–13–11–12–22–04–03–10–22–02–22–00–20–22–03–12–22–21–30–42–02–24–01–1
Indiana 3–14–03–12–22–22–02–02–21–10–22–01–13–03–11–11–31–32–23–11–11–10–21–12–04–00–22–03–0
L.A. Clippers 0–20–21–10–20–22–23–10–21–30–40–20–41–11–13–11–11–10–22–03–12–22–21–30–40–21–33–11–1
L.A. Lakers 2–02–00–20–20–24–02–22–03–11–31–14–02–02–03–12–01–11–11–13–12–23–11–32–22–02–24–01–1
Miami 2–21–32–21–33–12–02–03–11–12–00–31–10–23–01–15–01–31–33–11–10–21–11–10–22–10–21–12–2
Milwaukee 2–21–31–30–40–41–11–12–21–10–21–31–10–20–31–11–32–21–32–10–22–00–21–10–22–20–21–11–3
Minnesota 1–10–21–10–20–24–00–41–11–32–21–11–31–31–11–11–10–20–21–11–30–43–11–30–41–11–32–20–2
New Jersey 0–42–23–00–32–11–12–00–40–20–23–11–10–20–53–11–12–20–42–20–21–11–10–20–22–20–22–02–2
New York1–24–00–31–31–32–01–14–02–02–03–11–11–13–12–22–02–21–33–10–20–20–21–11–14–01–11–13–1
Orlando 2–23–14–01–32–11–11–13–12–02–02–22–01–13–13–12–04–03–14–02–01–11–11–11–12–11–12–04–0
Philadelphia 1–20–41–30–40–42–00–20–40–20–21–30–21–11–31–21–12–21–30–40–20–20–20–20–23–11–11–11–3
Phoenix 2–01–10–21–10–23–11–30–23–11–31–11–31–31–12–03–12–02–00–22–02–22–21–30–42–01–34–02–0
Portland 0–22–01–10–21–14–04–00–23–12–21–12–22–22–00–24–01–12–01–12–02–21–31–31–32–01–32–20–2
Sacramento 0–20–21–10–21–12–24–01–13–12–22–02–21–31–12–01–31–12–01–12–02–23–11–30–42–00–42–20–2
San Antonio 2–02–02–00–22–02–24–00–23–13–11–13–13–11–11–13–12–01–11–12–03–13–13–12–22–03–14–01–1
Seattle 2–02–02–01–12–02–23–11–14–04–00–24–02–22–02–04–02–01–11–12–04–03–14–02–21–13–13–11–1
Toronto 0–41–31–31–31–31–10–20–41–10–20–42–00–21–22–21–12–20–41–21–30–20–20–20–21–10–21–13–1
Utah 1–12–01–10–22–03–11–32–03–12–22–03–12–22–02–03–12–01–11–11–13–13–14–01–31–32–04–01–1
Vancouver 0–21–10–20–20–20–41–30–20–40–40–21–30–41–11–12–20–21–10–21–10–42–22–20–41–31–10–40–2
Washington 3–12–21–30–41–32–01–12–11–11–10–31–11–12–23–12–02–21–30–43–10–22–02–01–11–11–31–12–0

Schedule

GameDateOpponentResultKnicks pointsOpponentsRecordStreakNotes
1

Playoffs

East First Round

(4) Cleveland Cavaliers vs. (5) New York Knicks Last Playoff Meeting: 1995 Eastern Conference First Round (New York won 3-1)

GameDateHomeScoreVisitorScoreRecord

(CLE-NYK)

VenueRecapTelevision
1April 25Cleveland83New York1060-1 Gund Arena, Cleveland, Ohio 1 TBS 7:00et
2April 27Cleveland80New York840-2Gund Arena, Cleveland, Ohio 2 NBC 1:00et
3May 1New York81Cleveland760-3 Madison Square Garden, New York, New York 3 TBS 7:00et
New York wins series 3–0

East Conference Semifinals

(1) Chicago Bulls vs. (5) New York Knicks Last Playoff Meeting: 1994 Eastern Conference Semifinals (Chicago won 4-1)

GameDateHomeScoreVisitorScoreRecord

(CHI-NYK)

VenueRecapTelevision
1May 5Chicago91New York841-0 United Center, Chicago, Illinois 1 NBC 5:30et
2May 7Chicago91New York802-0United Center, Chicago, Illinois 2 TNT 9:30et
3*May 11New York102Chicago992-1 Madison Square Garden, New York, New York 3 NBC 1:00et
4May 12New York91Chicago943-1Madison Square Garden, New York, New York 4 NBC 5:30et
5May 14Chicago94New York814-1United Center, Chicago, Illinois 5 TNT 8:00et
Chicago wins series 4–1

*Required overtime

Player stats

PlayerGames PlayedPointsAssistsField GoalsRebounds

Transactions

Trades

October 13, 1995 To New York Knicks
1996 1st-round pick
To Miami Heat
Pat Riley (coach)


February 8, 1996 To New York Knicks
Brad Lohaus
J. R. Reid
1996 1st-round pick
To San Antonio Spurs
Charles Smith
Monty Williams


February 18, 1996 To New York Knicks
Victor Alexander
Willie Anderson
To Toronto Raptors
Doug Christie
Herb Williams
Cash

Free Agents

Additions
PlayerDate signedFormer team
Gary Grant November 8 Los Angeles Clippers
Matt Fish (10-day)February 24 Fort Wayne Fury (CBA)
Herb Williams February 28 Toronto Raptors
Ron Grandison (first 10-day)March 12 Omaha Racers (CBA)
Ron Grandison (remainder of season)March 29 New York Knicks
Subtractions
PlayerDate signedNew Team
Matt Fish March 5 Denver Nuggets

Awards and records

Records

Milestones

See also

Related Research Articles

New York Knicks American professional basketball team

The New York Knickerbockers, more commonly referred to as the Knicks, are an American professional basketball team based in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The Knicks compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference. The team plays its home games at Madison Square Garden, an arena they share with the New York Rangers of the National Hockey League (NHL). They are one of two NBA teams located in New York City; the other team is the Brooklyn Nets. Alongside the Boston Celtics, the Knicks are one of two original NBA teams still located in its original city.

Toronto Raptors Professional basketball team based in Toronto, Canada

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Marcus Camby American basketball player

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Patrick Ewing Jamaican-American basketball player

Patrick Aloysius Ewing is a Jamaican-American basketball coach and former professional player who is the head coach of the Georgetown University men's basketball team. He played most of his career as the starting center of the NBA's New York Knicks and also played briefly with the Seattle SuperSonics and Orlando Magic.

Jeff Van Gundy American basketball coach

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The 1995–96 NBA season was the 50th season of the National Basketball Association (NBA), though the 50th anniversary was not celebrated until the following season. The Chicago Bulls defeated the Seattle SuperSonics 4 games to 2 in the NBA Finals to win their fourth championship.

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The 1995–96 NBA season was the Bulls' 30th season in the National Basketball Association. During the offseason, the Bulls acquired rebound-specialist Dennis Rodman from the San Antonio Spurs, and signed free agent Randy Brown. Midway through the season, the team signed John Salley, who was released by the expansion Toronto Raptors. Salley won championships with the Detroit Pistons along with Rodman in 1989 and 1990. The 1995–96 Bulls were named one of the Top 10 Teams in NBA History during the celebration of the league's 50th anniversary in 1996. The team set the record for most wins in an NBA regular season in which they won the championship, finishing with 72 wins and 10 losses. The regular season record was broken by the 2015–16 Golden State Warriors, who finished 73–9; that Warriors team had a connection to the 1995–96 Bulls team as Steve Kerr, the Golden State coach, was a reserve point guard with the Bulls.

The 2000–01 NBA season was the Raptors' sixth season in the National Basketball Association. During the offseason, the Raptors acquired Corliss Williamson from the Sacramento Kings, and signed free agent Mark Jackson. However, Williamson was later on traded to the Detroit Pistons for Jerome Williams at midseason, while Jackson was traded along with Muggsy Bogues back to the New York Knicks for Chris Childs, and Kevin Willis was dealt to the Denver Nuggets for Keon Clark and Tracy Murray in two other separate midseason trades.

The 1995–96 NBA season was the eighth season for the Miami Heat in the National Basketball Association. Under new head coach Pat Riley, the Heat would be restructured. On the first day of the regular season, they acquired All-Star center Alonzo Mourning from the Charlotte Hornets. With the addition of Mourning along with the offseason acquisition of Rex Chapman from the Washington Bullets, the Heat won 11 of their first 14 games, but won only 9 of their next 32 games.

The 1991–92 NBA season was the 46th season of the National Basketball Association in New York City. In the offseason, the Knicks hired Pat Riley to take over as head coach, while acquiring All-Star forward Xavier McDaniel from the Phoenix Suns, and signing free agent Anthony Mason. Riley, who previously coached the Los Angeles Lakers two years ago had an impact, as the Knicks finished second in the Atlantic Division with a 51–31 record. Patrick Ewing was selected for the 1992 NBA All-Star Game. In the first round of the playoffs, the Knicks eliminated the Detroit Pistons in five games. In the semifinals, the Knicks faced off against the defending champion Chicago Bulls for the second straight year. The Knicks frustrated the Bulls and Michael Jordan with their physical play. The Knicks lost in seven games as the Bulls–Knicks rivalry was born.

The 1993–94 NBA season was the 48th season for the Knicks in the National Basketball Association in New York City. This marked the last season in which the Knicks were owned by Paramount Communications, which was sold near the end of the season to Viacom, which in turn sold them to ITT Corporation and Cablevision. A couple of years later, ITT would sell their share to Cablevision. The Knicks' current owner, The Madison Square Garden Company, is a spin-off of Cablevision.

The 1999–2000 NBA season was the 53rd season of the National Basketball Association in New York City. The Knicks entered the season as runner-ups of the 1999 NBA Finals, where despite losing to the San Antonio Spurs in five games, they became the first eighth seeded team to reach the NBA Finals. During the offseason, the Knicks re-signed free agent John Wallace. In his second year with the Knicks, Latrell Sprewell became a starter after playing off the bench last season and averaged 18.6 points per game. After advancing to the NBA Finals as the #8 seed last year, the Knicks finished second in the Atlantic Division with a 50–32 record, good enough for their first 50-win season since 1997. Allan Houston and head coach Jeff Van Gundy represented the Eastern Conference during the 2000 NBA All-Star Game. In the first round of the playoffs, the Knicks swept the Toronto Raptors in three straight games. In the semifinals, they faced the Miami Heat for the fourth consecutive year. They would defeat the 2nd-seeded Heat in a tough, hard-fought seven-game series, but would lose in six games to the Indiana Pacers in the Eastern Conference Finals, ending their hopes of making the Finals for a second straight year.

The 2000–01 NBA season was the 54th season of the National Basketball Association in New York City, New York. During the offseason, the Knicks acquired All-Star forward Glen Rice from the Los Angeles Lakers and Luc Longley from the Phoenix Suns. In their first season without Patrick Ewing, the Knicks remained a perennial playoff contender. At midseason, the team traded Chris Childs to the Toronto Raptors for former Knicks guard Mark Jackson and Muggsy Bogues, who never played for the Knicks due to a knee injury. The Knicks finished third in the Atlantic Division with a 48–34 record, earning the #4 seed in the Eastern Conference. Allan Houston and Latrell Sprewell were both selected for the 2001 NBA All-Star Game. However, in the playoffs, the Knicks failed to advance to the semifinals for the first time in ten years, as they were beaten by the 5th-seeded Raptors in five games after taking a 2–1 series lead.

The 1997–98 NBA season was the 52nd season for the Boston Celtics in the National Basketball Association. In the 1997 NBA draft, the Celtics selected Chauncey Billups out of the University of Colorado with the third pick. Billups only spent half of his rookie season in Boston, and was traded along with Dee Brown to the Toronto Raptors for Kenny Anderson at midseason. The Celtics also had the sixth pick in the draft and selected Ron Mercer from the University of Kentucky. In the offseason, they acquired second-year forward Walter McCarty from the New York Knicks and signed free agents Travis Knight, Andrew DeClercq and Bruce Bowen.

The 1997–98 New York Knicks season was the 52nd season for the New York Knicks in the National Basketball Association (NBA). During the offseason, the Knicks acquired Chris Mills from the Boston Celtics and Chris Dudley from the Portland Trail Blazers. At midseason, they traded Herb Williams to the Philadelphia 76ers for Terry Cummings. In the regular season, the Knicks had a 43–39 record, which placed them in a tie for second place in the Atlantic Division. Despite their lowest winning percentage since the 1990–91 season, the team qualified for the NBA Playoffs as the #7 seed. They also hosted the 1998 NBA All-Star Game at Madison Square Garden.

The 1996–97 New York Knicks season was the 51st season for the Knicks in the National Basketball Association (NBA). In the regular season, the Knicks finished in second place in the Atlantic Division with a 57–25 record, and made the NBA Playoffs for the 10th consecutive year.

The 1992–93 New York Knicks season was the 47th season for the Knicks in the National Basketball Association (NBA). During the offseason, the Knicks acquired Charles D. Smith, Doc Rivers and Bo Kimble from the Los Angeles Clippers. Other acquisitions included Rolando Blackman from the Dallas Mavericks, Tony Campbell from the Minnesota Timberwolves, and free agent Herb Williams. The Knicks finished the season by winning 24 of their final 28 games, including a nine-game winning streak in March and five straight victories to end the season. The team had the most wins in the Eastern Conference during the regular season; their 60–22 record earned them the conference's top seed in the 1993 NBA Playoffs. They also posted a 37–4 home record at Madison Square Garden. Head coach Pat Riley was named Coach of The Year, and Patrick Ewing was selected for the 1993 NBA All-Star Game.

The 1994–95 New York Knicks season was the 49th season for the Knicks in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Knicks entered the season as runner-ups of the 1994 NBA Finals, where they lost to the Houston Rockets in seven games. During the offseason, the Knicks acquired Doug Christie from the Los Angeles Lakers. However, Christie would play only twelve games because of an ankle injury. Early into the season, the team released Doc Rivers, who later signed as a free agent with the San Antonio Spurs. The Knicks posted a 55–27 record in the Atlantic Division, and finished in second place, two games behind the Orlando Magic. By earning the #3 seed in the Eastern Conference, the Knicks qualified for the NBA Playoffs for the eighth consecutive season. Patrick Ewing was selected for the 1995 NBA All-Star Game. John Starks led the league with 217 three-point field goals, and became the first player ever to reach up to 200 three-pointers in a single season. Power forward Anthony Mason was named Sixth Man of the Year.

References

  1. 1995-96 New York Knicks
  2. https://articles.latimes.com/1995-06-25/sports/sp-16910_1_coaching-jobs
  3. "Knicks Crown Nelson Coach Of New York". Orlando Sentinel. July 7, 1995. Retrieved November 2, 2016.
  4. "Turmoil Costs Nelson Knicks' Job". Los Angeles Times. March 9, 1996. Retrieved November 2, 2016.
  5. "PRO BASKETBALL;Knicks Deal Smith, and His Salary, to San Antonio". New York Times. February 9, 1996. Retrieved March 1, 2017.
  6. "BASKETBALL;Knicks Are Close to a Trade". New York Times. February 18, 1996. Retrieved March 1, 2017.
  7. "Mason Believes Ewing May Have Forced Him Out". New York Times. September 12, 1996. Retrieved November 2, 2016.
  8. "BASKETBALL;Harper Appears Headed To Mavs". New York Times. July 26, 1996. Retrieved November 2, 2016.
  9. "PRO BASKETBALL;Davis Traded by Knicks To Raptors for '97 Pick". New York Times. July 25, 1996. Retrieved November 2, 2016.
  10. "1995-96 NBA Transactions". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 1, 2017.
  11. "PRO BASKETBALL: KNICKS NOTEBOOK;Tucker Held in Attack on Officers". New York Times. February 7, 1996. Retrieved July 26, 2017.
  12. "1995-96 NBA Transactions". Basketball Reference. Retrieved November 2, 2016.