1995 FIFA Women's World Cup knockout stage

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The knockout stage of the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup was the second and final stage of the competition, following the group stage. It began on 13 June with the quarter-finals and ended on 18 June 1995 with the final match, held at the Råsunda Stadium in Solna. A total of eight teams (the top two teams from each group, along with the two best third-placed teams) advanced to the knockout stage to compete in a single-elimination style tournament. [1]

Contents

All times listed are local, CEST (UTC+2).

Format

In the knockout stage, if a match was level at the end of 90 minutes of normal playing time, extra time was played (two periods of 15 minutes each), where each team was allowed to make a fourth substitution. If still tied after extra time, the match was decided by a penalty shoot-out to determine the winner.

Qualified teams

The top two placed teams from each of the three groups, plus the two best-placed third teams, qualified for the knockout stage.

GroupWinnersRunners-upThird-placed teams
(Best two qualify)
A Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
B Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Flag of England.svg  England N/A
C Flag of the United States.svg  United States Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark

Quarter-finals

Japan vs United States

Japan  Flag of Japan.svg0–4Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report
Strömvallen, Gävle
Attendance: 3,756
Referee: Eduardo Gamboa (Chile)

Norway vs Denmark

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg3–1Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Report
Tingvalla IP, Karlstad
Attendance: 4,655
Referee: Pirom Un-prasert (Thailand)

Germany vs England

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg3–0Flag of England.svg  England
Report
Arosvallen, Västerås
Attendance: 2,317
Referee: Bente Skogvang (Norway)

Sweden vs China PR

Semi-finals

United States vs Norway

United States  Flag of the United States.svg0–1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Report
Arosvallen, Västerås
Attendance: 2,893
Referee: Alain Hamer (Luxembourg)

Germany vs China PR

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg1–0Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Report
Olympia, Helsingborg
Attendance: 3,693
Referee: Petros Mathabela (South Africa)

Third place play-off

China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg0–2Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report
Strömvallen, Gävle
Attendance: 4,335
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)

Final

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg0–2Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Report
Råsunda Stadium, Solna
Attendance: 17,158
Referee: Ingrid Jonsson (Sweden)
Kit left arm Germany 94 home.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body Germany 94 home.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm Germany 94 home.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts Germany 94 home.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Germany [2]
Kit left arm nor95h.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body nor95h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm nor95h.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts nor95h.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks nor95h.png
Kit socks long.svg
Norway [2]
GK1 Manuela Goller
SW5 Ursula Lohn
CB3 Birgitt Austermühl
CB2 Anouschka Bernhard Yellow card.svg 2'
DM8 Bettina Wiegmann
CM10 Silvia Neid (c)
CM7 Martina Voss
RW6 Maren Meinert Sub off.svg 86'
LW4 Dagmar Pohlmann Sub off.svg 75'
CF9 Heidi Mohr
CF16 Birgit Prinz Sub off.svg 42'
Substitutions:
FW11 Patricia Brocker Sub on.svg 42'
MF18 Pia Wunderlich Sub on.svg 75'
MF19 Sandra Smisek Sub on.svg 86'
Manager:
Gero Bisanz
GER-NOR (women) 1995-06-18.svg
GK1 Bente Nordby
RB2 Tina Svensson
CB5 Nina Nymark Andersen
CB3 Gro Espeseth (c)
LB13 Merete Myklebust
DM4 Anne Nymark Andersen Yellow card.svg 22'
CM6 Hege Riise
CM7 Tone Haugen
RW16 Marianne Pettersen
LW11 Ann Aarønes Yellow card.svg 70'
CF10 Linda Medalen Yellow card.svg 58'
Manager:
Even Pellerud

Assistant referees:
Gitte Holm (Denmark)
Maria Rodríguez (Mexico)

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References

  1. Shannon, David (25 June 2015). "Women's World Cup 1995 (Sweden)". RSSSF.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation . Retrieved 6 January 2020.
  2. 1 2 Eitzinger, Philipp (26 July 2013). "Ballverliebt Classics: Old-School-Deutsche, im WM-Finale vom hochmodernen Norwegen zerlegt" [Ballverliebt Classics: Old-school German, disassembled in the World Cup final by state-of-the-art Norway]. ballverliebt.eu (in German). Ballverliebt. Retrieved 6 January 2018.