1997 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship

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All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1997
Championship details
Dates 3 June — 7 September 1997
All-Ireland champions
Winners Cork (18th win)
Captain Linda Mellerick
All-Ireland runners-up
Runners-up Galway
Captain Martina Harkin
Manager Tony Ward
1996
1998

The 1997 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship known as the Bórd na Gaeilge All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship for sponsorship reasonswas the high point of the 1997 season. The championship was won by Cork who defeated Galway by a four-point margin in the final. The match drew an attendance of 10,212, then the second highest in the history of camogie. [1] [2]

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-seventh title thanks to a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

Foras na Gaeilge organization

Foras na Gaeilge is a public body responsible for the promotion of the Irish language throughout the island of Ireland, including both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. It was set up on 2 December 1999, assuming the roles of the Irish language board Bord na Gaeilge, the publisher An Gúm, and the terminological committee An Coiste Téarmaíochta, all three of which had formerly been state bodies of the Irish government.

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women; it is almost identical to the game of hurling played by men. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities. It is organised by the Dublin-based Camogie Association or An Cumann Camógaíochta. UNESCO lists Camogie as an element of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Contents

Semi-finals

The 22-year-old Sharon Glynn scored 2-12 in the semi-final including a 56th-minute goal just as Kilkenny were clawing their way back into the game in the semi-final at Loughrea. Wexford were outplayed by Cork in the second semi-final at Páirc Uí Rínn.

Sharon Glynn is a camogie player and manager, an All Ireland medalist in 1996 and the star of her county’s 2002 victory in the National Camogie League when she scored three goals in Galway’s 6-6 to 1-7 victory over Limerick. She was nominated for an All Star award in 2005.

Final

Angela Downey described the final as a slow-paced match and a poor game, but Cork deserved to win. Although Lynn Dunlea stretched Cork's lead to double scores, 0-14 to 1-4, almost 20 minutes into the second half the game had an unexpectedly exciting finish with Therese Maher being denied a match-saving goal by the Cork goalkeeper Cora Keohane. Pat Roche wrote in the Irish Times:

Lynn Dunlea is a former camogie player, scorer of three goals for Cork in their 1993 All Ireland final victory over Galway.

Therese Maher is a Camogie player, and winner of Five All Star awards 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2011 and 2013. She finally got her All-Ireland Medal in 2013 after 16 years of hardship when they defeated Kilkenny in the final 1-09 to 0-07 points. She plays for her club Athenry. She was also a member of the Galway senior panel that unsuccessfully contested the All Ireland finals of 2010 and 2011 against Wexford. She was Galway camogie player of the year 1998 and 2008 and a member of the Team of the Championship for 2011. She was also an All-Star nominee in 2010.

Weathering a storm of Galway onslaughts in the closing 10 minutes had been an achievement in itself. Avenging last year's defeat by Galway was sheer joy for the team - and for the supporters it was a delight to watch the skills of goalkeeper Cora Keohane, defenders Denise Cronin and Sandie Fitzgibbon, garnished by the delicate scoring touches of Lynn Dunlea, The timing of her scores in the second half was as crucial as the points themselves, as they staved off a threatened Galway storm. The best example of this came in the seventh minute of the second half after Denise Gilligan smashed home Galway's first goal, leaving only three points between the sides. Dunlea added a second to take the good out of that Galway goal and was on the mark again inside the last five minutes when the defiant Galway women got the deficit down to four points with a goal from substitute Veronica Curtin.

Denise Cronin is a former camogie player, captain of the All Ireland Camogie Championship winning team in 1995.

Sandie Fitzgibbon born in Cork is a former camogie player selected on the camogie team of the century in 2004, and winner of six All Ireland medals in 1982, 1983, 1992, 1993, 1995 and 1997.

Denise Gilligan is a camogie player, scorer of two goals for Galway in their breakthrough 1996 All Ireland final victory over Cork.

Galway manager Tony Ward said:

We threw it away in the first half. We have no excuses, we never played as well as we can."It's a double disappointment, I suppose, to lose two All-Irelands back to back. Still, I don't think anybody can say that there was too much between the teams out there. That extra bit of experience and luck probably saw them through, but we gave them a good match all the same.

Final stages

Galway 4-14 – 2-11 Kilkenny

Cork 3-22 – 1-7 Wexford

Cork 0-15 – 2-5 [3] Galway
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Cork
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Galway
CORK:
GK1 Cora Keohane (Barryroe)
FB2 Eithne Duggan (Bishopstown)
RWB3 Denise Cronin (Glen Rovers)
CB4 Sandie Fitzgibbon (Glen Rovers)
LWB5 Mags Finn (Fr O'Neill’s)
MF6 Linda Mellerick (Glen Rovers) (Capt)
MF7 Vivienne Harris (Bishopstown) (0-4)
MF8 Mary O'Connor (Killeagh) (0-1)
RWF9 Sinéad O'Callaghan (Ballinhassig)
CF10 Fiona O'Driscoll (Fr O'Neill’s)
LWF11 Irene O'Keeffe (2-0) (Inniscarra)
FF12 Lynn Dunlea (Glen Rovers) (0-10)
Substitutes:
MF Eileen Buckley (Aghabullogue GAA) Sub on.svg 30'
GALWAY:
GK1 Louise Curry (Pearses)
FB2 Olive Costello (Sarsfields)
RWB3 Olivia Broderick (Davitts)
CB4 Tracey Laheen (Pearses)
LWB5 Pamela Nevin (Mullagh)
MF6 Gretta Maher (Athenry)
MF7 Sharon Glynn (Pearses) (0-3)
MF8 Dympna Maher (Athenry)
RWF9 Martina Harkin (Pearses) (Capt)
CF10 Imelda Hobbins (Mullagh)
LWF11 Denise Gilligan (Craughwell) (1-0)
FF12 Anne Forde (Pearses) (0-1).
Substitutes:
FF Veronica Curtin (Kinvara) Sub on.svg 50'
FF Therese Maher (Athenry) Sub on.svg 50'

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References

  1. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. p. 460. 978-1-908591-00-5
  2. 1997 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner [ permanent dead link ] and Irish Times
  3. 1997 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner [ permanent dead link ] and Irish Times
Preceded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1996
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
1932 – present
Succeeded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1998