1998–99 NBA season

Last updated
1999 NBA season
League National Basketball Association
Sport Basketball
DurationFebruary 5 – May 5, 1999
May 8 – June 11, 1999 (Playoffs)
June 16 – 25, 1999 (Finals)
Number of games50
Number of teams29
TV partner(s) NBC, TBS, TNT
Draft
Top draft pick Michael Olowokandi
Picked by Los Angeles Clippers
Regular season
Top seed San Antonio Spurs
Season MVP Karl Malone (Utah)
Top scorer Allen Iverson (Philadelphia)
Playoffs
Eastern champions New York Knicks
  Eastern runners-up Indiana Pacers
Western championsSan Antonio Spurs
  Western runners-up Portland Trail Blazers
Finals
ChampionsSan Antonio Spurs
  Runners-upNew York Knicks
Finals MVP Tim Duncan (San Antonio)
NBA seasons

The 1999 NBA season was the 53rd season of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Due to a lockout, the season did not start until February 5, 1999, after a new six-year Collective Bargaining Agreement was reached between the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association. All 29 teams played a shortened 50-game regular season schedule and the 16 teams who qualified for the playoffs played a full post-season schedule. That season's All-Star Game was also canceled. The season ended with the San Antonio Spurs winning the franchise's first NBA championship, beating the New York Knicks 4 games to 1 in the 1999 NBA Finals. This was the 50th season since the BAA and NBL had merged into the NBA.

The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a men's professional basketball league in North America, composed of 30 teams. It is one of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada, and is widely considered to be the premier men's professional basketball league in the world.

The 1998–99 NBA lockout was the third lockout of four in the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA). It lasted from July 1, 1998, to January 20, 1999, and forced the 1998–99 regular season to be shortened to 50 games per team and that season's All-Star Game to be canceled. NBA owners reopened the league's collective bargaining agreement (CBA) in March 1998, seeking changes to the league's salary cap system and a ceiling on individual player salaries. The National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) opposed the owners' plans and wanted raises for players who earned the league's minimum salary. After the two sides failed to reach an agreement, the owners began the lockout.

The National Basketball Association All-Star Game is a basketball exhibition game hosted every February by the National Basketball Association (NBA) and showcases 24 of the league's star players. It is the featured event of NBA All-Star Weekend, a three-day event which goes from Friday to Sunday. The All-Star Game was first played at the Boston Garden on March 2, 1951.

Contents

Lockout

The second lockout in the history of the NBA lasted from July 1, 1998, to January 20, 1999. NBA owners were seeking changes to the league's salary cap system and a ceiling on individual player salaries. The National Basketball Players Association opposed the owners' plans and wanted raises for players who earned the league's minimum salary.

A lockout is a work stoppage or denial of employment initiated by the management of a company during a labor dispute. In contrast to a strike, in which employees refuse to work, a lockout is initiated by employers or industry owners. Lockouts are usually implemented by simply refusing to admit employees onto company premises, and may include changing locks or hiring security guards for the premises. Other implementations include a fine for showing up, or a simple refusal of clocking in on the time clock. For these reasons, lockouts are referred to as the antithesis of strikes.

National Basketball Players Association trade union

The National Basketball Players Association is a labor union that represents basketball players in the National Basketball Association (NBA). It was founded in 1954, making it the oldest trade union of the four major North American professional sports leagues. However, the NBPA did not get recognition by the NBA team owners until ten years later. Its offices are located in the historic Park and Tilford Building in New York City. It was briefly a trade association after dissolving as a union during the 2011 NBA lockout.

As the labor dispute continued into September, the preseason was shortened to just two games instead of the normal eight, and training camps were postponed indefinitely. [1] By October, it became the first time in NBA history that games were canceled due to a labor dispute. [2] Further games were canceled by November and December, including the All-Star Game, which had been scheduled to be played on February 14, 1999. The preseason was canceled as well.

An agreement between the owners and players was eventually reached on January 18, 1999. When play resumed, the regular season was shortened to 50 games per team, as opposed to the normal 82. To preserve games between teams in the same conference, much of the time missed was made up for by skipping well over half of the games played between teams in the opposite conference. As a result, some teams did not meet each other at all during the course of the shortened season.

Notable occurrences

Coaching changes
Offseason
Team1997–98 coach1998–99 coach
Chicago Bulls Phil Jackson Tim Floyd
Denver Nuggets Bill Hanzlik Mike D'Antoni
Los Angeles Clippers Bill Fitch Chris Ford
Milwaukee Bucks Chris Ford George Karl
Sacramento Kings Eddie Jordan Rick Adelman
Seattle SuperSonics George Karl Paul Westphal
In-season
TeamOutgoing coachIncoming coach
Charlotte Hornets Dave Cowens Paul Silas
Los Angeles Lakers Del Harris Bill Bertka
Bill Bertka Kurt Rambis
New Jersey Nets John Calipari Don Casey
Washington Wizards Bernie Bickerstaff Jim Brovelli
Michael Jordan American basketball player and businessman

Michael Jeffrey Jordan, also known by his initials MJ, is an American former professional basketball player and the principal owner of the Charlotte Hornets of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played 15 seasons in the NBA, winning six championships with the Chicago Bulls. His biography on the official NBA website states: "By acclamation, Michael Jordan is the greatest basketball player of all time." He was one of the most effectively marketed athletes of his generation and was considered instrumental in popularizing the NBA around the world in the 1980s and 1990s.

New York Knicks professional basketball team based in New York City, New York.

The New York Knickerbockers, more commonly referred to as the Knicks, are an American professional basketball team based in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The Knicks compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference. The team plays its home games at Madison Square Garden, an arena they share with the New York Rangers of the National Hockey League (NHL). They are one of two NBA teams located in New York City; the other is the Brooklyn Nets. Alongside the Boston Celtics, the Knicks are one of two original NBA teams still located in its original city.

Los Angeles Lakers American professional basketball team

The Los Angeles Lakers are an American professional basketball team based in Los Angeles. The Lakers compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA), as a member of the league's Western Conference in the Pacific Division. The Lakers play their home games at Staples Center, an arena shared with the NBA's Los Angeles Clippers, the Los Angeles Sparks of the Women's National Basketball Association, and the Los Angeles Kings of the National Hockey League. The Lakers are one of the most successful teams in the history of the NBA, and have won 16 NBA championships, the second-most behind the Boston Celtics.

1998–99 NBA changes

Indiana Pacers Basketball team in the National Basketball League

The Indiana Pacers are an American professional basketball team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. The Pacers compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member club of the league's Eastern Conference Central Division. The Pacers were first established in 1967 as a member of the American Basketball Association (ABA) and became a member of the NBA in 1976 as a result of the ABA–NBA merger. They play their home games at Bankers Life Fieldhouse. The team is named after Indiana's history with the Indianapolis 500's pace cars and with the harness racing industry.

Minnesota Timberwolves Professional basketball team in the National Basketball Association

The Minnesota Timberwolves are an American professional basketball team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Timberwolves compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member club of the league's Western Conference Northwest Division. Founded in 1989, the team is owned by Glen Taylor who also owns the WNBA's Minnesota Lynx. The Timberwolves play their home games at Target Center, their home since 1990.

Orlando Magic American professional basketball team based in Orlando, FL

The Orlando Magic are an American professional basketball team based in Orlando, Florida. The Magic compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the league's Eastern Conference Southeast Division. The franchise was established in 1989 as an expansion franchise, and such notable NBA stars as Shaquille O'Neal, Penny Hardaway, Patrick Ewing, Grant Hill, Tracy McGrady, Steve Francis, Dwight Howard, Vince Carter, Rashard Lewis, Dominique Wilkins, and Hedo Türkoğlu have played for the club throughout its young history. As of 2019, the franchise has played in the NBA playoffs for exactly half of its existence, and twice went to the NBA Finals, in 1995 and 2009. Orlando has been the second most successful of the four expansion teams brought into the league in 1988 and 1989 in terms of winning percentage, only after the Miami Heat.

Final standings

By division

Atlantic Division WLPCTGBHomeRoadDiv
y-Miami Heat 3317.66018–715–1012–8
x-Orlando Magic 3317.66021–412–1312–6
x-Philadelphia 76ers 2822.560517–811–149–10
x-New York Knicks 2723.540619–68–1712–8
Boston Celtics 1931.3801410–159–1610–9
Washington Wizards 1832.3601513–125–206–13
New Jersey Nets 1634.3201712–134–216–13
Central Division WLPCTGBHomeRoadDiv
y-Indiana Pacers 3317.66018–715–1015–7
x-Atlanta Hawks 3119.620216–915–1015–8
x-Detroit Pistons 2921.580417–812–1313–8
x-Milwaukee Bucks 2822.560517–811–1413–11
Charlotte Hornets 2624.520716–910–1512–10
Toronto Raptors 2327.4601014–119–169–14
Cleveland Cavaliers 2228.4401115–107–189–13
Chicago Bulls 1337.260208–175–204–19
Midwest Division WLPCTGBHomeRoadDiv
y-San Antonio Spurs 3713.74021–416–917–4
x-Utah Jazz 3713.74022–315–1015–3
x-Houston Rockets 3119.620619–612–1312–9
x-Minnesota Timberwolves 2525.5001218–77–1811–9
Dallas Mavericks 1931.3801815–104–218–12
Denver Nuggets 1436.2802312–132–235–16
Vancouver Grizzlies 842.160297–181–243–18
Pacific Division WLPCTGBHomeRoadDiv
y-Portland Trail Blazers 3515.70022–313–1215–7
x-Los Angeles Lakers 3119.620418–713–1214–8
x-Sacramento Kings 2723.540816–911–1411–9
x-Phoenix Suns 2723.540815–1012–139–10
Seattle SuperSonics 2525.5001017–88–1711–10
Golden State Warriors 2129.4201413–128–178–11
Los Angeles Clippers 941.180266–193–223–16

By conference

# Eastern Conference
TeamWLPCTGB
1c-Miami Heat 3317.660
2y-Indiana Pacers 3317.660
3x-Orlando Magic 3317.660
4x-Atlanta Hawks 3119.6202
5x-Detroit Pistons 2921.5804
6x-Philadelphia 76ers 2822.5605
7x-Milwaukee Bucks 2822.5605
8x-New York Knicks 2723.5406
9 Charlotte Hornets 2624.5207
10 Toronto Raptors 2327.46010
11 Cleveland Cavaliers 2228.44011
12 Boston Celtics 1931.38014
13 Washington Wizards 1832.36015
14 New Jersey Nets 1634.32017
15 Chicago Bulls 1337.26020
# Western Conference
TeamWLPCTGB
1z-San Antonio Spurs 3713.740
2y-Portland Trail Blazers 3515.7002
3x-Utah Jazz 3713.740
4x-Los Angeles Lakers 3119.6206
5x-Houston Rockets 3119.6206
6x-Sacramento Kings 2723.54010
7x-Phoenix Suns 2723.54010
8x-Minnesota Timberwolves 2525.50012
9 Seattle SuperSonics 2525.50012
10 Golden State Warriors 2129.42016
11 Dallas Mavericks 1931.38018
12 Denver Nuggets 1436.28023
13 Los Angeles Clippers 941.18028
14 Vancouver Grizzlies 842.16029

Notes

Playoffs

Teams in bold advanced to the next round. The numbers to the left of each team indicate the team's seeding in its conference, and the numbers to the right indicate the number of games the team won in that round. The division champions are marked by an asterisk. Home court advantage does not necessarily belong to the higher-seeded team, but instead the team with the better regular season record; teams enjoying the home advantage are shown in italics.

 First RoundConference SemifinalsConference Finals NBA Finals
                   
E1 Miami *2 
E8 New York 3 
 E8 New York 4 
 E4 Atlanta 0 
E4 Atlanta 3
E5 Detroit 2 
 E8 New York 4 
Eastern Conference
 E2 Indiana *2 
E3 Orlando 1 
E6 Philadelphia 3 
 E6 Philadelphia 0
 E2 Indiana *4 
E2 Indiana *3
E7 Milwaukee 0 
 E8 New York 1
 W1 San Antonio *4
W1 San Antonio *3 
W8 Minnesota 1 
 W1 San Antonio *4
 W4 LA Lakers 0 
W4 LA Lakers 3
W5 Houston 1 
 W1 San Antonio *4
Western Conference
 W2 Portland*0 
W3 Utah 3 
W6 Sacramento 2 
 W3 Utah 2
 W2 Portland*4 
W2 Portland *3
W7 Phoenix 0 


* Division winner
Bold Series winner
Italic Team with home-court advantage

Statistics leaders

CategoryPlayerTeamStat
Points per game Allen Iverson Philadelphia 76ers 26.8
Rebounds per game Chris Webber Sacramento Kings 13.0
Assists per game Jason Kidd Phoenix Suns 10.8
Steals per game Kendall Gill New Jersey Nets 2.68
Blocks per game Alonzo Mourning Miami Heat 3.91
FG% Shaquille O'Neal Los Angeles Lakers .576
FT% Reggie Miller Indiana Pacers .915
3FG% Dell Curry Milwaukee Bucks .476

NBA awards

Players of the month

The following players were named the Players of the Month.

MonthPlayer
Allen Iverson (Philadelphia 76ers)
Tim Duncan (San Antonio Spurs)
Jason Kidd (Phoenix Suns)

Rookies of the month

The following players were named the Rookies of the Month.

MonthPlayer
Paul Pierce (Boston Celtics)
Vince Carter (Toronto Raptors)
Vince Carter (Toronto Raptors)

Coaches of the month

The following coaches were named Coaches of the Month.

MonthCoach
Jerry Sloan (Utah Jazz)
Mike Dunleavy, Sr. (Portland Trail Blazers)
Gregg Popovich (San Antonio Spurs)

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References

  1. "Lockout cuts into preseason schedule". The San Diego Union-Tribune . September 25, 1998. p. D11.
  2. Wise, Mike (October 15, 1998). "Pro Basketball; N.B.A. Owners Cool To Players' Proposal". The New York Times. Retrieved April 22, 2009.