1998 Czech legislative election

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1998 Czech legislative election
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
  1996 19–20 June 1998 2002  

All 200 seats in the Chamber of Deputies
101 seats needed for a majority
 First partySecond partyThird party
  Milos Zeman.jpg Vaclav Klaus headshot.jpg Miroslav Grebenicek (4).jpg
Leader Miloš Zeman Václav Klaus Miroslav Grebeníček
Party ČSSD ODS KSČM
Seats won746324
Seat changeIncrease2.svg13Decrease2.svg5Increase2.svg2
Popular vote1,928,6601,656,011658,550
Percentage32.31%27.74%11.03%
SwingIncrease2.svg2.69 pp Decrease2.svg1.88 pp Increase2.svg1.30 pp

 Fourth partyFifth party
  Josef Lux 01.jpg Charta-setkani-signataru-ke-40.-vyroci-Lucerna2017-047.jpg
Leader Josef Lux Jan Ruml
Party KDU–ČSL US
Seats won2019
Seat changeIncrease2.svg2New
Popular vote537,013513,596
Percentage8.99%8.60%
SwingIncrease2.svg0.91 pp

Prime Minister before election

Josef Tošovský
Independent

Prime Minister after election

Miloš Zeman
ČSSD

Parliamentary elections were held in the Czech Republic on 19 and 20 June 1998. [1] The result was a victory for the Czech Social Democratic Party, which won 74 of the 200 seats. Voter turnout was 73.9%. [2]

Contents

Background

The Civic Democratic Party (ODS) had won the 1996 parliamentary elections. The party's leader, Václav Klaus, then formed a minority government supported by the Czech Social Democratic Party (ČSSD). [3] [4] The government lasted until 1998, when it resigned during a political crisis that caused the division of ODS and the disintegration of the ruling coalition. Snap elections was called for June 1998. [5] [6]

Campaign

The ODS was weakened by the creation of a new party, the Freedom Union (US). The US was formed by former members of ODS who had left after a conflict with Václav Klaus. The ODS was polling at around 10%, with the US expected to replace it as the major right-wing party. The ČSSD was expected to win by large margin. The ODS launched their campaign with warnings that a new government would contain Communist members and used its leader Klaus heavily during the campaign. The ČSSD criticised the work of Klaus' cabinet and recycled slogans used during 1996 campaign, as well as promising to fight against corruption. [6]

Finances

PartyMoney spent (Kč)
Civic Democratic Party 30,000,000
Czech Social Democratic Party 30,000,000
Christian and Democratic Union – Czechoslovak People's Party 30,000,000
Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia 8,000,000
Freedom Union 2,000,000
Source: České Noviny

Opinion polls

Polling firmDate ODS ČSSD KSČM KDU-ČSL ODA US SPR-RSČ DŽJ Others
STEM [7] January 199815.032.010.011.0n/an/a5.0n/a27.0
IVVMJanuary 1998 [8] 15.428.08.611.15.3n/a3.50.626.4
STEMFebruary 199812.029.011.09.0n/a11.08.0n/a20.0
IVVMMarch 1998 [8] 10.325.78.07.71.212.65.41.627.9
STEMMarch 199811.030.09.09.0n/a18.08.0n/a15.0
STEMApril 199816.024.011.09.01.413.06.04.015.6
IVVM (for US) [8] April 199815.923.710.79.11.312.75.76.23.3
IVVM [8] April 199811.325.110.08.00.412.04.64.923.5
STEMMay 199816.025.011.09.0n/a14.05.0n/a20.0
IVVM (for US) [8] May 199816.325.410.59.01.313.75.16.33.2
IVVM [8] May 199814.222.18.55.80.69.13.910.226.2
IVVM [8] June 199815.022.57.47.1n/a6.84.29.026.8
STEMJune 199819.022.09.07.0n/a8.05.0n/a30.0
Sofres Factum [9] 10 June 199819.526.79.06.0n/a5.4n/an/a12.9
Sofres Factum [9] 12 June 199819.129.39.16.0n/a6.9n/an/a8.3
STEM [9] 12 June 199820.723.210.38.8n/a8.4n/an/a9.1
Sofres Factum [9] 17 June 199821.427.69.27.5n/a7.1n/an/a10.3
Exit Polls
IFES and SC&C [9] 20 June 199827.132.211.49.2n/a8.53.93.0
Sofres Factum [9] 20 June 199827.032.011.09.2n/a8.43.83.8
Election results19-20 June 199827.732.311.09.008.63.93.13.5

Results

Popular vote
ČSSD
32.31%
ODS
27.74%
KSČM
11.03%
KDU-ČSL
8.99%
US
8.60%
SPR-RSČ
3.90%
DŽJ
3.06%
DEU
1.44%
SZ
1.12%
Others
1.81%
Parliamentary seats
ČSSD
37.00%
ODS
31.50%
KSČM
12.00%
KDU-ČSL
10.00%
US
9.50%
Chambre des deputes Tchequie 1998.svg
PartyVotes%Seats+/–
Czech Social Democratic Party 1,928,66032.3174+13
Civic Democratic Party 1,656,01127.7463–5
Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia 658,55011.0324+2
KDU-ČSL 537,0138.9920+2
Freedom Union 513,5968.6019New
SPR-RSČ 232,9653.900–18
Pensioners for Life Security 182,9003.0600
Democratic Union 86,4311.4400
Green Party 67,1431.120New
Independents51,9810.8700
Moravian Democratic Party22,2820.370New
Czech National Social Party 17,1850.290New
Civic Coalition – Political Club14,7880.250New
Invalid/blank votes25,339
Total5,994,8441002000
Registered voters/turnout8,116,83673.9
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

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