1998 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament

Last updated
1998 NCAA Division I
Women's Basketball Tournament
1998WomensFinalFourLogo.jpg
Teams64
Finals site Kemper Arena
Kansas City, Missouri
Champions Tennessee Volunteers (6th title)
Runner-up Louisiana Tech Techsters (6th title game)
Semifinalists
NCAA Division I Women's Tournaments
« 1997 1999 »

The 1998 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 13, 1998, and concluded on March 29, 1998, when Tennessee won the national title. The Final Four was held at Kemper Arena in Kansas City, Missouri, on March 27–29, 1998. Tennessee, Louisiana Tech, NC State, and Arkansas qualified to the Final Four. Tennessee and Louisiana Tech won their semi-final Final Four matchups and continued on to the championship. Tennessee defeated Louisiana Tech 93–75 to take their sixth title, and complete an undefeated season (39–0).

Contents

For the first time in the men's or women's tournament, two teams, Tennessee and Liberty, entered the tournament unbeaten (this feat was replicated in 2014 by the women's teams from Connecticut and Notre Dame). In the Mideast Regional, the Lady Vols blew out Liberty 102–58. However, in the West Regional, the expected 1–16 blowout did not happen. In that matchup, Harvard defeated an injury-plagued #1 seed Stanford on its home court 71–67. This was the first time in the men's or women's tournament that a #16 seed had beaten a #1 seed, a feat that would not be repeated until 2018 in the men's tournament. In addition, 9th-seeded Arkansas made the final four, the highest seed ever to do so in the women's tournament. The ninth-seeded Razorbacks remain the lowest seeded team to ever reach the Final Four in the women's tournament. Only 10th-seeded Oregon in 2017, 10th-seeded Creighton in 2022 and 11th-seeded Gonzaga in 2011 have even reached an Elite Eight to be in position to break this record. In addition, Arkansas remains the only 9 seed to even reach the Elite Eight in the women's tournament.

Tournament records

Qualifying teams – automatic

Sixty-four teams were selected to participate in the 1998 NCAA Tournament. Thirty conferences were eligible for an automatic bid to the 1998 NCAA tournament. [1]

Automatic bids
  Record 
Qualifying schoolConferenceRegular
Season
ConferenceSeed
University of Connecticut Big East 31–217–12
Drake University Missouri Valley Conference 25–417–15
Fairfield University MAAC 20–914–415
Florida International University Trans America 28–115–17
Grambling State University SWAC 23–614–216
University of Wisconsin–Green Bay Horizon League 21–811–314
Harvard University Ivy League 22–412–216
College of the Holy Cross Patriot League 21–810–214
Howard University MEAC 23–616–215
Kent State University MAC 23–618–013
Liberty University Big South Conference 28–012–016
Louisiana Tech University Sun Belt Conference 26–313–13
University of Maine America East 21–813–513
University of Memphis Conference USA 22–714–25
Middle Tennessee State University Ohio Valley Conference 18–1111–715
University of Montana Big Sky Conference 24–515–114
University of New Mexico WAC 26–610–48
University of North Carolina ACC 24–611–52
Old Dominion University Colonial 27–216–01
Purdue University Big Ten 20–910–64
Santa Clara University West Coast Conference 23–711–314
St. Francis (PA) Northeast Conference 22–714–216
Stanford University Pac-10 21–517–11
Stephen F. Austin State University Southland 25–315–19
University of Tennessee SEC 33–014–01
Texas Tech University Big 12 Conference 25–415–11
University of California, Santa Barbara Big West Conference 26–514–111
University of North Carolina at Greensboro Southern Conference 21–812–415
Virginia Tech Atlantic 10 21–911–511
Youngstown State University Mid-Continent 27–215–112

Qualifying teams – at-large

Thirty-four additional teams were selected to complete the sixty-four invitations. [1]

At-large bids
  Record 
Qualifying schoolConferenceRegular
Season
ConferenceSeed
University of Alabama Southeastern22–910–42
University of Arizona Pacific-1021–614–43
University of Arkansas Southeastern18–107–79
Clemson University Atlantic Coast24–712–46
Colorado State University Western Athletic23–511–312
Duke University Atlantic Coast21–713–32
University of Florida Southeastern21–810–43
The George Washington University Atlantic 1019–912–410
University of Georgia Southeastern17–108–67
University of Hawaii at Mānoa Western Athletic24–313–18
University of Illinois Big Ten18–912–43
University of Iowa Big Ten17–1013–34
Iowa State University Big 1224–712–44
University of Kansas Big 1221–811–55
University of Louisville Conference USA19–1112–410
Marquette University Conference USA22–613–310
University of Massachusetts Atlantic 1019–1011–513
University of Miami Big East19–913–511
University of Michigan Big Ten19–910–610
Missouri State University Missouri Valley24–514–48
University of Nebraska–Lincoln Big 1222–911–59
North Carolina State University Atlantic Coast21–612–44
University of Notre Dame Big East20–912–69
University of Oregon Pacific-1017–913–512
Rutgers University Big East20–914–45
Southern Methodist University Western Athletic21–711–311
Tulane University Conference USA21–612–412
University of California, Los Angeles Pacific-1019–814–47
University of Utah Western Athletic21–511–37
Vanderbilt University Southeastern20–89–56
University of Virginia Atlantic Coast18–99–76
University of Washington Pacific-1018–99–913
Western Kentucky University Sun Belt25–812–28
University of Wisconsin–Madison Big Ten21–99–76

Bids by conference

Thirty conferences earned an automatic bid. In nineteen cases, the automatic bid was the only representative from the conference. Thirty-four additional at-large teams were selected from eleven of the conferences. [1]

BidsConferenceTeams
6 Southeastern Tennessee, Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Vanderbilt
5 Atlantic Coast North Carolina, Clemson, Duke, North Carolina St., Virginia
5 Big Ten Purdue, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Wisconsin
5 Pacific-10 Stanford, Arizona, Oregon, UCLA, Washington
5 Western Athletic New Mexico, Colorado St., Hawaii, SMU, Utah
4 Big 12 Texas Tech, Iowa St., Kansas, Nebraska
4 Big East Connecticut, Miami, Notre Dame, Rutgers
4 Conference USA Memphis, Louisville, Marquette, Tulane
3 Atlantic 10 Virginia Tech, George Washington, Massachusetts
2 Missouri Valley Drake, Missouri St.
2 Sun Belt Louisiana Tech, Western Ky.
1 America East Maine
1 Big Sky Montana
1 Big South Liberty
1 Big West UC Santa Barb.
1 Colonial Old Dominion
1 Horizon Green Bay
1 Ivy Harvard
1 Metro Atlantic Fairfield
1 Mid-American Kent St.
1 Mid-Continent Youngstown St.
1 Mid-Eastern Howard
1 Northeast St. Francis (PA)
1 Ohio Valley Middle Tenn.
1 Patriot Holy Cross
1 Southern UNC Greensboro
1 Southland Stephen F. Austin
1 Southwestern Grambling
1 Trans America FIU
1 West Coast Santa Clara

First and second rounds

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Norfolk
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Raleigh
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Storrs
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Tucson
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Chapel Hill
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Knoxville
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Champaign
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Ames
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Ruston
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West Lafayette
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Tuscaloosa
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Lubbock
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Iowa City
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Stanford
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Gainesville
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Durham
1998 NCAA NCAA first and second round venues

In 1998, the field remained at 64 teams. The teams were seeded, and assigned to four geographic regions, with seeds 1–16 in each region. In Round 1, seeds 1 and 16 faced each other, as well as seeds 2 and 15, seeds 3 and 14, seeds 4 and 13, seeds 5 and 12, seeds 6 and 11, seeds 7 and 10, and seeds 8 and 9. In the first two rounds, the top four seeds were given the opportunity to host the first round game. In all cases, the higher seed accepted the opportunity.

The following table lists the region, host school, venue and the sixteen first and second round locations: [2]

RegionRndHostVenueCityState
East 1&2 Old Dominion University Old Dominion University Fieldhouse Norfolk Virginia
East 1&2 North Carolina State University Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
East 1&2 University of Connecticut Harry A. Gampel Pavilion Storrs Connecticut
East 1&2 University of Arizona McKale Center Tucson Arizona
Mideast 1&2 University of North Carolina Carmichael Auditorium Chapel Hill North Carolina
Mideast 1&2 University of Tennessee Thompson-Boling Arena Knoxville Tennessee
Mideast 1&2 University of Illinois Assembly Hall (Champaign) Champaign Illinois
Mideast 1&2 Iowa State University Hilton Coliseum Ames Iowa
Midwest 1&2 Louisiana Tech University Thomas Assembly Center Ruston Louisiana
Midwest 1&2 Purdue University Mackey Arena West Lafayette Indiana
Midwest 1&2 University of Alabama Coleman Coliseum Tuscaloosa Alabama
Midwest 1&2 Texas Tech University Lubbock Municipal Coliseum Lubbock Texas
West 1&2 University of Iowa Carver–Hawkeye Arena Iowa City Indiana
West 1&2 Stanford University Maples Pavilion Stanford California
West 1&2 University of Florida O'Connell Center Gainesville Florida
West 1&2 Duke University Cameron Indoor Stadium Durham North Carolina

Regionals and Final Four

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Nashville
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Lubbock
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Dayton
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Oakland
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Kansas City
1998 NCAA regionals and Final Four

The Regionals, named for the general location, were held from March 20 to March 23 at these sites:

Each regional winner advanced to the Final Four held March 27 and March 29 in Kansas City, Missouri, at the Kemper Arena

Bids by state

The sixty-four teams came from thirty-four states, plus Washington, D.C. Four states, California, Tennessee, Virginia and North Carolina each had the most teams with four bids. Sixteen states did not have any teams receiving bids. [1]

NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 1998 NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 1998.svg
NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 1998
BidsStateTeams
4 California Santa Clara, Stanford, UC Santa Barb., UCLA
4 North Carolina North Carolina, UNC Greensboro, Duke, North Carolina St.
4 Tennessee Memphis, Middle Tenn., Tennessee, Vanderbilt
4 Virginia Liberty, Old Dominion, Virginia Tech, Virginia
3 Florida FIU, Florida, Miami
3 Iowa Drake, Iowa, Iowa St.
3 Louisiana Grambling, Louisiana Tech, Tulane
3 Massachusetts Harvard, Holy Cross, Massachusetts
3 Texas Stephen F. Austin, Texas Tech, SMU
3 Wisconsin Green Bay, Marquette, Wisconsin
2 Connecticut Connecticut, Fairfield
2 District of Columbia Howard, George Washington
2 Indiana Purdue, Notre Dame
2 Kentucky Louisville, Western Ky.
2 Ohio Kent St., Youngstown St.
1 Alabama Alabama
1 Arizona Arizona
1 Arkansas Arkansas
1 Colorado Colorado St.
1 Georgia Georgia
1 Hawaii Hawaii
1 Illinois Illinois
1 Kansas Kansas
1 Maine Maine
1 Michigan Michigan
1 Missouri Missouri St.
1 Montana Montana
1 Nebraska Nebraska
1 New Jersey Rutgers
1 New Mexico New Mexico
1 Pennsylvania St. Francis
1 Oregon Oregon
1 South Carolina Clemson
1 Utah Utah
1 Washington Washington

Brackets

Data source [1]

East Region – Dayton, Ohio

First round
March 13 and 14
Second round
March 15 and 16
Regional semifinals
March 21
Regional finals
March 23
            
1 at Old Dominion 92
16 St. Francis, PA 39
1 Old Dominion75
Norfolk, VA
9 Nebraska 60
8 New Mexico 59
9 Nebraska 76
1 Old Dominion 54
4 North Carolina State55
5 Memphis 80
12 Youngstown State 91
12 Youngstown State 61
Raleigh, NC
4 North Carolina State88
4 at North Carolina State 89
13 Maine 64
4 North Carolina State60
2 Connecticut 52
6 Virginia 77
11 SMU 68
6 Virginia 77
Tucson, AZ
3 Arizona94
3 at Arizona 75
14 Santa Clara 63
3 Arizona 57
2 Connecticut74
7 Georgia 72
10 George Washington 74
10 George Washington 67
Storrs, CT
2 Connecticut75
2 at Connecticut 93
15 Fairfield 52

Mideast Region

First round
March 13 and 14

Higher Seed's Home Court

Second round
March 15 and 16

Higher Seed's Home Court

Regional semifinals
March 21

Memorial Gymnasium

Nashville, TN

Regional finals
March 23

Memorial Gymnasium

Nashville, TN

            
1 at Tennessee 102
16 Liberty 58
1 Tennessee82
8 Western Kentucky 62
8 Western Kentucky 88
9 Stephen F. Austin 76
1 Tennessee92
5 Rutgers 60
5 Rutgers 79
12 Oregon 76
5 Rutgers62
4 Iowa State 61
4 at Iowa State 79
13 Kent State 76
1 Tennessee76
2 North Carolina 70
6 Vanderbilt 71
11 UC Santa Barbara 76
11 UC Santa Barbara 65
3 Illinois69
3 at Illinois 82
14 Green Bay 58
3 Illinois 74
2 North Carolina80
7 Florida International 59
10 Marquette 45
7 Florida International 72
2 North Carolina85
2 at North Carolina 91
15 Howard 71

Midwest Region

First round
March 12 and 13

Higher Seed's Home Court

Second round
March 14 and 15

Higher Seed's Home Court

Regional semifinals
March 20

Lubbock Municipal Coliseum

Lubbock, Texas

Regional finals
March 22

Lubbock Municipal Coliseum

Lubbock, Texas

            
1 at Texas Tech 87
16 Grambling State 75
1 Texas Tech 59
9 Notre Dame74
8 SW Missouri State 64
9 Notre Dame 78
9 Notre Dame 65
4 Purdue70
5 Drake 75
12 Colorado State 81
12 Colorado State 63
4 Purdue77
4 at Purdue 88
13 Washington 71
4 Purdue 65
3 Louisiana Tech72
6 Clemson 60
11 Miami (FL) 49
6 Clemson 52
3 Louisiana Tech74
3 at Louisiana Tech 86
14 Holy Cross 58
3 Louisiana Tech71
2 Alabama 57
7 UCLA 65
10 Michigan 58
7 UCLA 74
2 Alabama75
2 at Alabama 94
15 UNC-Greensboro 46

West Region

First round
March 13 and 14

Higher Seed's Home Court

Second round
March 15 and 16

Higher Seed's Home Court*

Regional semifinals
March 21

The New Arena

Oakland, CA

Regional finals
March 23

The New Arena

Oakland, CA

            
1 at Stanford 67
16 Harvard 71
16 Harvard 64
9 Arkansas82
8 Hawaii 70
9 Arkansas 76
9 Arkansas79
5 Kansas 63
5 Kansas 72
12 Tulane 68
5 Kansas62
4 Iowa 58
4 at Iowa 77
13 Massachusetts 59
9 Arkansas77
2 Duke 72
6 Wisconsin 64
11 Virginia Tech 75
11 Virginia Tech 57
3 Florida89
3 at Florida 85
14 Montana 64
3 Florida 58
2 Duke71
7 Utah 61
10 Louisville 69
10 Louisville 53
2 Duke69
2 at Duke 92
15 Middle Tennessee 67

Final Four – Kansas City, Missouri

National semifinals
March 27
National championship
March 29
      
E4 NC State 65
MW3 Louisiana Tech84
MW3 Louisiana Tech 75
ME1 Tennessee93
ME1 Tennessee86
W9 Arkansas 58

E-East; ME-Mideast; MW-Midwest; W-West.

Record by conference

Sixteen conferences had more than one bid, or at least one win in NCAA Tournament play: [1]

Conference# of BidsRecordWin %Round
of 32
Sweet
Sixteen
Elite
Eight
Final
Four
Championship
Game
Southeastern 6 14–5.737 4 4 2 2 1
Atlantic Coast 5 12–5.706 5 3 3 1
Big Ten 5 6–5.545 3 2 1
Pacific-10 5 3–5.375 2 1
Western Athletic 5 1–5.167 1
Big East 4 7–4.636 3 3 1
Big 12 4 5–4.556 4 1
Conference USA 4 1–4.200 1
Atlantic 10 3 2–3.400 2
Sun Belt 2 6–2.750 2 1 1 1 1
Missouri Valley 2 0–2
Colonial 1 2–1.667 1 1
Big West 1 1–1.500 1
Ivy 1 1–1.500 1
Mid-Continent 1 1–1.500 1
Trans America 1 1–1.500 1

Fourteen conferences went 0–1: America East, Big Sky Conference, Big South Conference, Horizon League, MAAC, MAC, MEAC, Northeast Conference, Ohio Valley Conference, Patriot League, Southern Conference, Southland, SWAC, and West Coast Conference [1]

All-Tournament team

Game officials

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Nixon, Rick. "Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 22 April 2012.
  2. "Attendance and Sites" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 19 March 2012.

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