1998 NFL season

Last updated

1998 National Football League season
Regular season
DurationSeptember 6 – December 28, 1998
Playoffs
Start dateJanuary 2, 1999
AFC Champions Denver Broncos
NFC Champions Atlanta Falcons
Super Bowl XXXIII
DateJanuary 31, 1999
Site Pro Player Stadium, Miami
Champions Denver Broncos
Pro Bowl
DateFebruary 7, 1999
Site Aloha Stadium
Usa edcp relief location map.png
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Colts
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Patriots
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Bills
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Dolphins
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Jets
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Bengals
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Ravens
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Oilers
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Steelers
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Jaguars
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Broncos
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Chiefs
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Raiders
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Chargers
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Seahawks
AFC teams: Yellow ffff00 pog.svg West, Blue pog.svg Central, White pog.svg East
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Cowboys
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Giants
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Eagles
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Cardinals
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Redskins
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Bears
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Lions
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Packers
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Vikings
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Buccaneers
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Falcons
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Rams
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Saints
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49ers
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Panthers
NFC teams: Yellow ffff00 pog.svg West, Blue pog.svg Central, White pog.svg East

The 1998 NFL season was the 79th regular season of the National Football League.

Contents

The season culminated with Super Bowl XXXIII, with the Denver Broncos defeating the Atlanta Falcons 34–19 at Pro Player Stadium in Miami. The Broncos had won their first thirteen games, the best start since the undefeated 1972 Dolphins, and were tipped by some to have a realistic chance at winning all nineteen games. [1] [2] The Minnesota Vikings became the first team since the 1968 Baltimore Colts to win all but one of their regular season games and not win the Super Bowl. After no team had won 14 regular season games since the 1992 49ers, three teams went 14–2 or better for the only time in a 16-game season.

Football Outsiders argued that "1998 was the last hurrah for the great quarterbacks who came into the league in the 1980s. The top four QBs [statistically] were all over 35: Vinny Testaverde, Randall Cunningham, Steve Young, and John Elway. Troy Aikman, age 32, was fifth. Dan Marino was 11th in his last good year." [3]

Draft

The 1998 NFL Draft was held from April 17 to 18, 1998 at New York City's Theater at Madison Square Garden. With the first pick, the Indianapolis Colts selected quarterback Peyton Manning from the University of Tennessee.

Referee changes

Dale Hamer and Gary Lane returned to head linesman and side judge, respectively. Tony Corrente and Ron Winter were promoted to referee.

Mike Pereira left the field after two seasons as a side judge to become an assistant supervisor of officials. He succeeded Jerry Seeman as Vice President of Officiating in 2001. Pereira's replacement, Terry McAulay, assumed Pereira's old position and uniform number (77). McAulay was promoted to referee in 2001 and was crew chief for three Super Bowls (XXXIX, XLIII and XLVIII).

Major rule changes

Preseason

Hall of Fame Game

The 1998 Hall of Fame Class included Paul Krause, Tommy McDonald, Anthony Muñoz, an offensive lineman for the Cincinnati Bengals, Mike Singletary, a member of the Chicago Bears Super Bowl XX championship team, and Dwight Stephenson, a Pro Bowl offensive lineman with the Miami Dolphins.

Regular season

Scheduling formula

    Inter-conference
AFC East vs NFC West
AFC Central vs NFC Central
AFC West vs NFC East

Highlights of the 1998 season included:

Final standings

Tiebreakers

Playoffs

Jan 3 – Alltel Stadium Jan 10 – Giants Stadium
6 New England 10
3Jacksonville24
3 Jacksonville 25Jan 17 – Mile High Stadium
2 NY Jets 34
AFC
Jan 2 – Pro Player Stadium 2NY Jets10
Jan 9 – Mile High Stadium
1Denver23
5 Buffalo 17AFC Championship
4Miami3
4 Miami 24Jan 31 – Pro Player Stadium
1 Denver 38
Wild Card playoffs
Divisional playoffs
Jan 3 – 3Com Park A1Denver34
Jan 9 – Georgia Dome
N2Atlanta19
5 Green Bay 27 Super Bowl XXXIII
4San Francisco18
4 San Francisco 30 Jan 17 – Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome
2 Atlanta 20
NFC
Jan 2 – Texas Stadium 2Atlanta30*
Jan 10 – Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome
1Minnesota27
6 Arizona 20NFC Championship
6Arizona21
3 Dallas 7
1 Minnesota 41


* Indicates overtime victory

Statistical leaders

Team

Points scoredMinnesota Vikings (556)
Total yards gainedSan Francisco 49ers (6,800)
Yards rushingSan Francisco 49ers (2,544)
Yards passingMinnesota Vikings (4,328)
Fewest points allowedMiami Dolphins (265)
Fewest total yards allowedSan Diego Chargers (4,208)
Fewest rushing yards allowedSan Diego Chargers (1,140)
Fewest passing yards allowedPhiladelphia Eagles (2,720)

Individual

Scoring Gary Anderson, Minnesota (164 points)
Touchdowns Terrell Davis, Denver (23 TDs)
Most field goals made Al Del Greco, Tennessee (36 FGs)
RushingTerrell Davis, Denver (2,008 yards)
Passing Randall Cunningham, Minnesota, (106.0 rating)
Passing touchdowns Steve Young, San Francisco (36 TDs)
Pass receiving O.J. McDuffie, Miami (90 catches)
Pass receiving yards Antonio Freeman, Green Bay (1,424)
Receiving touchdowns Randy Moss, Minnesota (17 touchdowns)
Punt returns Deion Sanders, Dallas (15.6 average yards)
Kickoff returns Terry Fair, Detroit (28.0 average yards)
Interceptions Ty Law, New England (8)
Punting Craig Hentrich, Tennessee (47.2 average yards)
Sacks Michael Sinclair, Seattle (16.5)

Awards

Most Valuable Player Terrell Davis, running back, Denver
Coach of the Year Dan Reeves, Atlanta
Offensive Player of the Year Terrell Davis, running back, Denver
Defensive Player of the Year Reggie White, defensive end, Green Bay
Offensive Rookie of the Year Randy Moss, wide receiver, Minnesota
Defensive Rookie of the Year Charles Woodson, cornerback, Oakland
NFL Comeback Player of the Year Doug Flutie, quarterback, Buffalo
NFL Man of the Year Dan Marino, quarterback, Miami
Super Bowl Most Valuable Player John Elway, quarterback, Denver

Coaching changes

Stadium changes

New uniforms

Television

This was the first season that CBS held the rights to televise AFC games, taking over from NBC. Meanwhile, this was the first time that ESPN broadcast all of the Sunday night games throughout the season (this was also the first season in which ESPN's coverage used the Monday Night Football themes, before reverting to using an original theme in 2001). ABC and Fox renewed their rights for Monday Night Football and the NFC package, respectively. All of these networks signed eight-year television contracts through the 2005 season. [5]

This was also the first season where the late games kicked off at 4:05pm ET & 4:15pm ET (replacing the original 4:00pm ET start time), to give networks more time to finish the early games before the start of the late games. The 4:15 start time would last until 2011.

MNF broadcasts were also pushed back from its 9:00pm ET start time to 8:00pm ET. The actual kickoffs were at 8:20pm, preceded by a new pregame show hosted by Chris Berman. Frank Gifford was then reassigned as a special contributor to the pregame show, while Boomer Esiason replaced Gifford in the booth.

Longtime CBS Sports announcer Jim Nantz was named as the host of the revived The NFL Today pregame show, with Marcus Allen, Brent Jones, and George Seifert as analysts. For its new lead broadcast team, CBS hired Greg Gumbel and Phil Simms from NBC. Randy Cross also came from NBC, and was paired with longtime CBS Sports announcer Verne Lundquist to form the network's new #2 crew.

Fox hired Cris Collinsworth from NBC to replace Ronnie Lott as one of the Fox NFL Sunday analysts.

ESPN hired Paul Maguire from NBC to join Mike Patrick and Joe Theismann in a three-man booth.

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References

  1. "New York eyes 19–0, but there's no rush" in Minneapolis Star Tribune , November 16, 1998
  2. Freeman, Mike; "Chasing Perfection and Taking Questions; Voluble Broncos Are 13–0 and Ready to Talk" in The New York Times , December 9, 1998
  3. "1998 DVOA Ratings and Commentary". Football Outsiders. Retrieved November 1, 2021.
  4. Pincus, David (November 26, 2010). "11/26/1998 - The Turkey Day coin flip". sbnation.com. Retrieved December 3, 2016.
  5. Quinn, Kevin G. (2011). The Economics of the National Football League: The State of the Art. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 338. ISBN   978-1-4419-6289-8.