1999–2000 FA Premier League

Last updated

FA Premier League
Season1999–2000
Dates7 August 1999 – 14 May 2000
Champions Manchester United
6th Premier League title
13th English title
Relegated Watford
Wimbledon
Sheffield Wednesday
Champions League Manchester United
Arsenal
Leeds United
UEFA Cup Chelsea
Liverpool
Leicester City
Intertoto Cup Aston Villa
Bradford City
Matches played380
Goals scored1,060 (2.79 per match)
Top goalscorer Kevin Phillips (30 goals)
Biggest home win Newcastle United 8–0 Sheffield Wednesday
(19 September 1999)
Biggest away win Derby County 0–5 Sunderland
(18 September 1999)
Highest scoring West Ham United 5–4 Bradford City
(12 February 2000)
Tottenham Hotspur 7–2 Southampton
(11 March 2000)
Longest winning run11 games [1]
Manchester United
Longest unbeaten run16 games [1]
Chelsea
Longest winless run11 games [1]
Sunderland
Watford
Longest losing run8 games [1]
Wimbledon
Highest attendance61,619
Manchester United v Derby County
(11 March 2000)
Lowest attendance8,248
Wimbledon v Sheffield Wednesday
(12 April 2000)
Average attendance30,755
2000–01

The 1999–2000 FA Premier League (known as the FA Carling Premiership for sponsorship reasons) was the eighth season of the FA Premier League, and Manchester United secured their sixth Premiership title. Like the previous season, they lost only three league games all season. Unlike in 1998–99 season, they won by a comfortable margin – 18 points as opposed to a single point.

Contents

Their only disappointment of the season came when they lost their defence of the European Cup following a 3–2 defeat against Real Madrid in the quarter finals. Manchester United had withdrawn from the 1999–2000 FA Cup to participate in the FIFA World Club Championship at the request of the FA who wanted Manchester United to compete to support England's bid to host the World Cup. Chelsea would go on to win the last FA Cup held at Wembley Stadium before its redevelopment. The League Cup final was won by Leicester City, for the second time in four seasons. In Europe, Leeds United reached the UEFA Cup semi final and Arsenal were on the losing side to Galatasaray in the UEFA Cup final.

Only one newly promoted team suffered relegation: Watford, who finished in last place, and achieved a record Premiership low of just 24 points (a record since broken by Sunderland (twice) and by Derby County, Aston Villa and Huddersfield Town), despite a decent start to their campaign which saw them beat both Liverpool (at Anfield) and Chelsea. The most successful promoted team was Sunderland, who finished seventh in the final table and spent much of the season pushing for a place in European competition. Bradford City, back in the top division for the first time since 1922, secured their Premiership survival on the last day of the season with a 1–0 win over Liverpool. The result meant that Liverpool lost out on a Champions League place, and Wimbledon were relegated after 14 years of top-division football. Second-from-bottom Sheffield Wednesday were relegated in their penultimate game of the season, having spent 15 of the previous 16 seasons in the top division. Wednesday's season included an 8–0 defeat at Newcastle. Amazingly Coventry City went all season without an away win but still managed to secure 14th place due to an impressive home record which saw them win 12 out of their 19 matches.

As well as Premiership champions Manchester United and runners-up Arsenal, third placed Leeds United qualified for the 2000–01 Champions League. UEFA Cup places went to fourth placed Liverpool, F.A Cup winners Chelsea, and League Cup winners Leicester City.

Promoted to the Premiership for 2000–01 were First Division champions Charlton Athletic, runners-up Manchester City and playoff winners Ipswich Town. For the first time since the formation of the Premiership, all of the promoted teams had been members of the Premiership before.

Teams

Twenty teams competed in the league – the top seventeen teams from the previous season and the three teams promoted from the First Division. The promoted teams were Sunderland, Bradford City and Watford, returning after absences of two, seventy-seven and eleven years respectively. This was also both Bradford City and Watford's first season in the Premier League. They replaced Charlton Athletic, Blackburn Rovers and Nottingham Forest. Charlton Athletic and Nottingham Forest were immediately relegated after a season's presence while Blackburn Rovers' seven-year top flight spell came to an end.

Stadiums and Locations

Greater London UK location map 2.svg
Greater London Premier League football clubs
TeamLocationStadiumCapacity
Arsenal London (Highbury) Arsenal Stadium 38,419
Aston Villa Birmingham Villa Park 42,573
Bradford City Bradford Valley Parade 25,136
Chelsea London (Fulham) Stamford Bridge 42,055
Coventry City Coventry Highfield Road 23,489
Derby County Derby Pride Park Stadium 33,597
Everton Liverpool (Walton) Goodison Park 40,569
Leeds United Leeds Elland Road 40,242
Leicester City Leicester Filbert Street 22,000
Liverpool Liverpool (Anfield) Anfield 45,522
Manchester United Old Trafford Old Trafford 68,174
Middlesbrough Middlesbrough Riverside Stadium 35,049
Newcastle United Newcastle upon Tyne St James' Park 52,387
Sheffield Wednesday Sheffield Hillsborough Stadium 39,732
Southampton Southampton The Dell 15,200
Sunderland Sunderland Stadium of Light 49,000
Tottenham Hotspur London (Tottenham) White Hart Lane 36,240
Watford Watford Vicarage Road 19,920
West Ham United London (Upton Park) Boleyn Ground 35,647
Wimbledon London (Wimbledon) Selhurst Park [lower-alpha 1] 26,074
  1. Due to Wimbledon lacking a home stadium, they played their home games at Selhurst Park, which is the home stadium of Crystal Palace.

Personnel and kits

(as of 14 May 2000)

TeamManagerCaptainKit manufacturerShirt sponsor
Arsenal Flag of France.svg Arsène Wenger Flag of England.svg Tony Adams Nike Dreamcast/Sega
Aston Villa Flag of England.svg John Gregory Flag of England.svg Gareth Southgate Reebok LDV Vans
Bradford City Flag of England.svg Paul Jewell Flag of Scotland.svg Stuart McCall Asics JCT600
Chelsea Flag of Italy.svg Gianluca Vialli Flag of England.svg Dennis Wise Umbro Autoglass
Coventry City Flag of Scotland.svg Gordon Strachan Flag of Scotland.svg Gary McAllister CCFC Garments Subaru
Derby County Flag of England.svg Jim Smith Flag of Jamaica.svg Darryl Powell Puma EDS
Everton Flag of Scotland.svg Walter Smith Flag of England.svg Dave Watson Umbro One2One
Leeds United Flag of Ireland.svg David O'Leary Flag of South Africa.svg Lucas Radebe Puma Packard Bell
Leicester City Ulster Banner.svg Martin O'Neill Flag of Scotland.svg Matt Elliott Fox Leisure Walkers Crisps
Liverpool Flag of France.svg Gérard Houllier Flag of England.svg Jamie Redknapp Reebok Carlsberg Group
Manchester United Flag of Scotland.svg Sir Alex Ferguson Flag of Ireland.svg Roy Keane Umbro Sharp
Middlesbrough Flag of England.svg Bryan Robson Flag of England.svg Paul Ince Erreà BT Cellnet
Newcastle United Flag of England.svg Bobby Robson Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Adidas Newcastle Brown Ale
Sheffield Wednesday Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Peter Shreeves (caretaker) Flag of England.svg Des Walker PumaSanderson
Southampton Flag of England.svg Glenn Hoddle Flag of England.svg Matt Le Tissier Saints Friends Provident
Sunderland Flag of England.svg Peter Reid Flag of England.svg Steve Bould AsicsReg Vardy
Tottenham Hotspur Flag of Scotland.svg George Graham Flag of England.svg Sol Campbell Adidas Holsten
Watford Flag of England.svg Graham Taylor Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Rob Page Le Coq Sportif Phones4U
West Ham United Flag of England.svg Harry Redknapp Ulster Banner.svg Steve Lomas Fila Dr. Martens
Wimbledon Flag of England.svg Terry Burton Flag of Jamaica.svg Robbie Earle Lotto Tiny

Managerial changes

TeamOutgoing managerManner of departureDate of vacancyPosition in tableIncoming managerDate of appointment
Wimbledon Flag of Ireland.svg Joe Kinnear Resigned9 June 1999Pre-season Flag of Norway.svg Egil Olsen 9 June 1999
Newcastle United Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ruud Gullit Resigned28 August 1999 [2] 19th Flag of England.svg Bobby Robson 2 September 1999 [3]
Southampton Flag of England.svg Dave Jones Contract terminated27 January 2000 [lower-alpha 1] 17th Flag of England.svg Glenn Hoddle 28 January 2000
Sheffield Wednesday Flag of England.svg Danny Wilson Sacked21 March 2000 [4] 19th Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Peter Shreeves (caretaker)21 March 2000
Wimbledon Flag of Norway.svg Egil Olsen Sacked1 May 2000 [5] 18th Flag of England.svg Terry Burton 1 May 2000
  1. Jones was put on gardening leave on 27 January, with Glenn Hoddle taking over as interim manager. At the end of the season, Jones's contract was terminated, and Hoddle took over the position permanently.

League table

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification or relegation
1 Manchester United (C)3828739745+5291Qualification for the Champions League first group stage
2 Arsenal 3822797343+3073
3 Leeds United 38216115843+1569Qualification for the Champions League third qualifying round
4 Liverpool 38191095130+2167Qualification for the UEFA Cup first round [lower-alpha 1]
5 Chelsea 38181195334+1965
6 Aston Villa 381513104635+1158Qualification for the Intertoto Cup third round
7 Sunderland 381610125756+158
8 Leicester City 38167155555055Qualification for the UEFA Cup first round [lower-alpha 2]
9 West Ham United 381510135253155
10 Tottenham Hotspur 38158155749+853
11 Newcastle United 381410146354+952
12 Middlesbrough 381410144652652
13 Everton 381214125949+1050
14 Coventry City 38128184754744
15 Southampton 381281845621744
16 Derby County 389111844571338
17 Bradford City 38992038683036Qualification for the Intertoto Cup second round
18 Wimbledon (R)387121946742833Relegation to the Football League First Division
19 Sheffield Wednesday (R)38872338703231
20 Watford (R)38662635774224
Source: Premier League
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated
Notes:
  1. Chelsea qualified for the UEFA Cup as FA Cup winners.
  2. Leicester City qualified for the UEFA Cup as League Cup winners.

Results

Home \ Away ARS AVL BRA CHE COV DER EVE LEE LEI LIV MUN MID NEW SHW SOU SUN TOT WAT WHU WIM
Arsenal 3–12–0 2–1 3–02–14–12–02–10–11–25–10–03–33–14–1 2–1 1–02–11–1
Aston Villa 1–11–00–02–03–01–02–20–00–11–00–12–10–11–11–14–02–21–1
Bradford City 2–11–11–11–14–40–01–23–11–00–41–12–01–11–20–41–13–20–33–0
Chelsea 2–3 1–01–02–14–01–1 0–2 1–12–05–01–11–03–01–14–01–02–10–03–1
Coventry City 3–22–14–02–22–01–03–4 0–1 0–31–22–14–14–10–13–20–14–01–02–0
Derby County 1–20–20–13–10–01–00–13–00–21–21–30–03–32–00–50–12–01–24–0
Everton 0–10–04–01–11–12–14–42–2 0–0 1–10–20–21–14–15–02–24–21–04–0
Leeds United 0–41–22–1 0–1 3–00–01–12–11–20–12–03–22–01–02–11–03–11–04–1
Leicester City 0–33–13–02–2 1–0 0–11–12–12–20–22–11–23–02–15–20–11–01–32–1
Liverpool 2–00–03–11–02–02–0 0–1 3–10–2 2–3 0–02–14–10–01–12–00–11–03–1
Manchester United 1–13–04–03–23–23–15–12–02–0 1–1 1–05–14–03–34–03–14–17–11–1
Middlesbrough 2–10–40–10–12–01–42–10–00–31–03–4 2–2 1–03–2 1–1 2–11–12–00–0
Newcastle United 4–20–12–00–12–02–01–12–20–22–23–0 2–1 8–05–0 1–2 2–11–02–23–3
Sheffield Wednesday 1–10–12–01–00–00–20–20–34–01–20–11–00–20–10–21–22–23–15–1
Southampton 0–12–01–01–20–03–32–00–31–21–11–31–14–22–01–20–12–02–12–0
Sunderland 0–02–10–14–11–11–12–11–22–00–22–2 1–1 2–2 1–02–02–12–01–02–1
Tottenham Hotspur 2–1 2–41–10–13–21–13–21–22–31–03–12–33–10–17–23–14–00–02–0
Watford 2–30–11–01–01–00–01–31–21–12–32–31–31–11–03–22–31–11–22–3
West Ham United 2–11–15–40–05–01–10–40–02–11–02–40–12–14–32–01–11–01–02–1
Wimbledon 1–33–20–11–12–20–32–02–11–22–22–32–00–21–11–01–15–02–2
Source: [ citation needed ]
Legend: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.

Season statistics

Scoring

Top scorers

Sunderland's Kevin Phillips was the top scorer, with 30 goals. Kevin Phillips 2014 .jpg
Sunderland's Kevin Phillips was the top scorer, with 30 goals.
RankPlayerClubGoals
1 Flag of England.svg Kevin Phillips Sunderland30
2 Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer Newcastle United23
3 Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Dwight Yorke Manchester United20
4 Flag of England.svg Michael Bridges Leeds United19
Flag of England.svg Andy Cole Manchester United
6 Flag of France.svg Thierry Henry Arsenal17
7 Flag of Italy.svg Paolo Di Canio West Ham United16
8 Flag of England.svg Chris Armstrong Tottenham Hotspur14
Flag of Norway.svg Steffen Iversen Tottenham Hotspur
Flag of Ireland.svg Niall Quinn Sunderland

Hat-tricks

The 1999-2000 Premier League season would see Everton's Nick Barmby score his one and only hat-trick during his professional career. Nick Barmby 23-07-11 1.png
The 1999–2000 Premier League season would see Everton's Nick Barmby score his one and only hat-trick during his professional career.
PlayerForAgainstResultDateRef
Flag of England.svg Michael Bridges Leeds UnitedSouthampton3–0 (A)11 August 1999 [6]
Flag of England.svg Andy Cole 4Manchester UnitedNewcastle United5–1 (H)30 August 1999 [7]
Flag of England.svg Kevin Phillips SunderlandDerby County5–0 (A)18 September 1999 [8]
Flag of England.svg Alan Shearer 5Newcastle UnitedSheffield Wednesday8–0 (H)19 September 1999 [9]
Flag of Nigeria.svg Nwankwo Kanu ArsenalChelsea3–2 (A)23 October 1999 [10]
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Marc Overmars ArsenalMiddlesbrough5–1 (H)21 November 1999 [11]
Flag of Norway.svg Ole Gunnar Solskjær 4PManchester UnitedEverton5–1 (H)4 December 1999 [12]
Flag of England.svg Nick Barmby EvertonWest Ham United4–0 (A)26 February 2000 [13]
Flag of England.svg Stan Collymore Leicester CitySunderland5–2 (H)5 March 2000 [14]
Flag of Norway.svg Steffen Iversen Tottenham HotspurSouthampton7–2 (H)11 March 2000 [15]
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Dwight Yorke Manchester UnitedDerby County3–1 (H)11 March 2000 [16]
Flag of England.svg Paul Scholes Manchester UnitedWest Ham United7–1 (H)1 April 2000 [17]
Flag of England.svg Dean Windass Bradford CityDerby County4–4 (H)21 April 2000 [18]
Note:5 Player scored 5 goals; 4 Player scored 4 goals; P Player scored a perfect hat-trick; (H) – Home; (A) – Away

Top assists

Manchester United's David Beckham was the joint top assist provider with 15 assists for the club in the 1999-2000 Premier League season. 1999 FA Cup Final Beckham corner (cropped).jpg
Manchester United's David Beckham was the joint top assist provider with 15 assists for the club in the 1999–2000 Premier League season.
RankPlayerClubAssists [19]
1 Flag of England.svg David Beckham Manchester United15
Flag of Peru.svg Nolberto Solano Newcastle United
3 Flag of Italy.svg Paolo Di Canio West Ham United13
4 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ryan Giggs Manchester United12
5 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Dennis Bergkamp Arsenal9
6 Flag of England.svg Nick Barmby Everton8
Flag of France.svg Thierry Henry Arsenal
Flag of Norway.svg Steffen Iversen Tottenham Hotspur
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Wim Jonk Sheffield Wednesday
Flag of England.svg Paul Merson Aston Villa

Awards

Monthly awards

Alex Ferguson was Manager of the Month three times during the 1999-2000 Premier League season, and was later named Manager of the Season. Alex Ferguson.jpg
Alex Ferguson was Manager of the Month three times during the 1999–2000 Premier League season, and was later named Manager of the Season.
Month Manager of the Month Player of the Month
ManagerClubPlayerClub
August Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Ferguson Manchester United Flag of Ireland.svg Robbie Keane Coventry City
September Flag of Scotland.svg Walter Smith Everton Flag of England.svg Muzzy Izzet Leicester City
October Flag of England.svg Peter Reid Sunderland Flag of England.svg Kevin Phillips Sunderland
November Ulster Banner.svg Martin O'Neill Leicester City Flag of Finland.svg Sami Hyypiä Liverpool
December Flag of France.svg Gérard Houllier Liverpool Flag of Ireland.svg Roy Keane Manchester United
January Ulster Banner.svg Danny Wilson Sheffield Wednesday Flag of England.svg Gareth Southgate Aston Villa
February Flag of England.svg Bobby Robson Newcastle United Flag of England.svg Paul Merson Aston Villa
March Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Ferguson Manchester United Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Dwight Yorke Manchester United
AprilManchester United Flag of France.svg Thierry Henry Arsenal

Annual awards

AwardWinnerClub
Premier League Manager of the Season Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Ferguson Manchester United
Premier League Player of the Season Flag of England.svg Kevin Phillips Sunderland
PFA Players' Player of the Year Flag of Ireland.svg Roy Keane Manchester United
PFA Young Player of the Year Flag of Australia (converted).svg Harry Kewell Leeds United
FWA Footballer of the Year Flag of Ireland.svg Roy Keane Manchester United
PFA Team of the Year
Goalkeeper Flag of England.svg Nigel Martyn (Leeds United)
Defence Flag of Ireland.svg Gary Kelly (Leeds United) Flag of the Netherlands.svg Jaap Stam (Manchester United) Flag of Finland.svg Sami Hyypiä (Liverpool) Flag of Ireland.svg Ian Harte (Leeds United)
Midfield Flag of England.svg David Beckham (Manchester United) Flag of Ireland.svg Roy Keane (Manchester United) Flag of France.svg Patrick Vieira (Arsenal) Flag of Australia (converted).svg Harry Kewell (Leeds United)
Attack Flag of England.svg Andy Cole (Manchester United) Flag of England.svg Kevin Phillips (Sunderland)

Related Research Articles

The 2001–02 FA Premier League was the tenth season of the competition. It began with a new sponsor, Barclaycard, and was titled the FA Barclaycard Premiership, replacing the previous sponsor, Carling. The title race turned into a battle among four sides – Arsenal, Manchester United, Liverpool and Newcastle United.

This article concerns football records in England. Unless otherwise stated, records are taken from the Football League or Premier League. Where a different record exists for the top flight, this is also given.

The 2002–03 season was the 123rd season of competitive football in England.

The 1994–95 FA Premier League was the third season of the Premier League, the top division of professional football in England.

The 1997–98 FA Premier League was the sixth season of the FA Premier League. It saw Arsenal lift their first league title since 1991 and, in so doing, became only the second team to win 'The Double' for the second time.

1998–99 FA Premier League

The 1998–99 FA Premier League was the seventh season of the Premier League, the top division of English football, since its establishment in 1992. Manchester United won a unique treble of the league title, the FA Cup and the UEFA Champions League. They secured their fifth league championship in seven seasons after losing just three league games all season.

The 2000–01 FA Premier League was the ninth FA Premier League season and the third season running which ended with Manchester United as champions and Arsenal as runners-up. Sir Alex Ferguson became the first manager to win three successive English league titles with the same club. Liverpool, meanwhile, managed a unique cup treble – winning the FA Cup, League Cup and UEFA Cup. They also finished third in the Premier League and qualified for the Champions League. Nike replaced Mitre as manufacturer of the official Premier League match ball, a contract that has since been extended multiple times, with the most recent renewal made in November 2018 to the end of the 2024–25 season.

The 2000–01 season was the 121st season of competitive football in England.

The 1995–96 season was the 116th season of competitive football in England.

The 1998–99 season was the 119th season of competitive football in England.

The 1999–2000 season was the 120th season of competitive football in England.

The 2006–07 FA Premier League was the 15th season of the FA Premier League since its establishment in 1992. The season started on 19 August 2006 and concluded on 13 May 2007. On 12 February 2007, the FA Premier League renamed itself simply the Premier League, complete with new logo, sleeve patches and typeface. The sponsored name remains the Barclays Premier League.

2007–08 Premier League 16th season of the Premier League

The 2007–08 Premier League season was the 16th since its establishment. The first matches of the season were played on 11 August 2007, and the season ended on 11 May 2008. Manchester United went into the 2007–08 season as the Premier League's defending champions, having won their ninth Premier League title and sixteenth league championship overall the previous season. This season was also the third consecutive season to see the "Big Four" continue their stranglehold on the top four spots.

The 2000–01 season was Chelsea F.C.'s 87th competitive season, ninth consecutive season in the FA Premier League and 95th year as a club.

The 1999–2000 season was Chelsea F.C.'s 86th competitive season, eighth consecutive season in the FA Premier League and 94th year as a club.

The 2000–01 FA Cup was the 120th season of the world's oldest knockout football competition, the FA Cup. The competition was won by Liverpool, who came from 1–0 behind against Arsenal to eventually win 2–1 in the final. The final was played outside England for the first time, at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, because Wembley Stadium was being knocked down to be replaced with a new stadium.

The 1999–2000 season was the 108th season in Liverpool F.C.'s existence. The club finished fourth in the Premier League, thus qualifying for the 2000–01 UEFA Cup.

This article covers the squad and match results for Newcastle United's 1999–2000 season.

During the 1999–2000 season, Leeds United A.F.C. competed in the FA Premier League.

During the 1999–2000 English football season, Leicester City F.C. competed in the FA Premier League.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "English Premier League 1999–2000". statto.com. Retrieved 11 March 2015.
  2. "Ruud Gullit quits Newcastle". The Guardian. 28 August 1999. Retrieved 26 October 2018.
  3. "Robson takes Newcastle hotseat". BBC News. 3 September 1999. Retrieved 26 October 2018.
  4. "Wednesday sack Wilson and turn to Shreeves". The Guardian. 22 March 2000. Retrieved 23 August 2019.
  5. "Olsen axed by Wimbledon". BBC News. BBC. 1 May 2000. Retrieved 27 April 2012.
  6. "Bridges blasts hat-trick". BBC Sport. 11 August 1999. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  7. "On this day..." BBC News. 30 August 2002. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  8. Tongue, Steve (19 September 1999). "Football: Phillips' hat-trick demolishes Derby". The Independent. London. Retrieved 16 July 2009.
  9. "In pictures: Dennis Bergkamp's 100 Arsenal goals". BBC Sport. 4 January 2003. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  10. "Kanu hat-trick sinks Chelsea". BBC Sport. 23 October 1999. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  11. Moore, Glenn (22 November 1999). "Football: Arsenal revived as Overmars hits overdrive". The Independent. London. Retrieved 18 July 2009.
  12. Townsend, Nick (5 December 1999). "Football: Phillips' hat-trick demolishes Derby". The Independent. London. Retrieved 16 July 2009.
  13. Brunton, Simon (27 February 2000). "Hammers crumble under Barmby hat-trick". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 18 July 2009.
  14. "Collymore hat-trick sinks Sunderland". BBC Sport. 5 March 2000. Retrieved 18 July 2009.
  15. "Hoddle humbled on Spurs return". BBC Sport. 11 March 2009. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  16. "Yorke treble tethers Rams". BBC Sport. 11 March 2000. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  17. "Manchester United 7–1 West Ham United". Soccerbase. Retrieved 18 July 2009.[ permanent dead link ]
  18. "Bradford 4–4 Derby". BBC Sport. 21 April 2000. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  19. "Statistical Leaders – 2000". Premier League. Archived from the original on 24 June 2017. Retrieved 5 May 2018.