1999 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament

Last updated
1999 NCAA Division I
women's basketball tournament
1999WomensFinalFourLogo.jpg
Teams64
Finals site San Jose Arena
San Jose, California
Champions Purdue Boilermakers (1st title)
Runner-up Duke Blue Devils (1st title game)
Semifinalists
Winning coach Carolyn Peck (1st title)
MOP Ukari Figgs (Purdue)
NCAA Division I women's tournaments
« 1998 2000 »

The 1999 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 12, 1999, and concluded on March 28, 1999, when Purdue won its first national championship in any women's sport. The Final Four was held at the San Jose Arena in San Jose, California, on March 26–28, 1999. Purdue defeated Duke 62-45 in Carolyn Peck's final game as head coach for the Boilermakers. She had previously announced her intention of leaving Purdue after two seasons to coach the expansion WNBA Orlando Miracle.

Contents

The two finalists had recent "off the court" history. Duke's coach, Gail Goestenkors, was a former assistant coach at Purdue under Lin Dunn until becoming the Blue Devils' head coach in 1992. Dunn's firing from Purdue in 1996 and the subsequent player defections resulted in the unusual scenario that two Blue Devil players in the championship game had formerly transferred from Purdue. Purdue's Ukari Figgs was named Most Outstanding Player. [1]

Notable events

Tennessee, which had won the prior three national championships, was selected as a 1 seed, and started out strongly, beating Appalachian State 113–54. They continued on easily through the second and third rounds, then faced Duke in the East regional final. Duke was the 3 seed, but had upset Old Dominion 76–63 to reach the regional final. Tennessee and Duke had met in the regular season, with the Lady Vols winning by 14. The game was played in North Carolina, but Tennessee fans outnumbered Duke fans. Tennessee's Chamique Holdsclaw, generally considered the top player in the college game, missed her first ten shots, and ended up with only eight points, her lowest point total of the year. Duke reached an eleven-point lead in the first half, but Tennessee started out the second half strong, hitting four baskets in a row, and cut the lead to four points. Duke went over five minutes without scoring a basket, but Tennessee could only cut the lead to a single point. Duke's Georgia Schweitzer tied her career high with 22 points, and the Blue Devils advanced to the Final Four for the first time in their history. [2] [3]

Connecticut was the 1 seed in the Mideast regional, and hosted the first two rounds at their home court, Gampel Pavilion. The Huskies won their first game easily, beating St. Francis (PA) by 51 points. The second game, against Xavier, would prove to be very different. Xavier led by as many as ten points in the second half, and with just over two minutes to play, the Musketeers had an eight-point lead, 84–76. UConn scored six consecutive points to tie the game at 84 points each. With 37 seconds left in the game Xavier's Nikki Kremer was fouled, and headed to the line, having hit all eight free throw attempts on the day. She missed both attempts. After Shea Ralph missed a jumper, Tamika Williams snared the rebound and was fouled. With seven seconds left in the game she hit both free throws. Xavier tried two desperation shots, but missed both, and UConn narrowly escaped an upset on their own court. [4] [5]

Georgia faced Duke in one of the national semi-finals. Georgia hit nine of their sixteen three point attempts, and held the Miller twins, who have been averaging 37 points per game, to only 31. Duke lead at halftime, then went on a 14–5 run the extend the lead. Georgia later responded with a 13–4 run, but could not take, the lead. Duke went on to win the game 81–69 and advance to their first championship game. [6]

Louisiana Tech returned to the Final Four, a year after reaching the championship game. However, Purdue came into the game riding a 30-game winning streak. Purdue's Ukari Figgs scored 18 points in the first half, leading to a 40–27 lead at halftime. The Lady Techsters fought back in the second half, and cut the lead to three points, but Purdue's Stephanie White-McCarty stole the ball for a score, and followed it with a shot-clock beating basket to extend the led back to seven points. Louisiana Tech would not get closer again, and the Boilermakers extended their winning streak to 31 games, and a place in the championship match with a 77–63 win. [7]

Tournament records

Qualifying teams – automatic

Sixty-four teams were selected to participate in the 1999 NCAA Tournament. Thirty conferences were eligible for an automatic bid to the 1999 NCAA tournament. [8]

Automatic Bids
  Record 
Qualifying SchoolConferenceRegular
Season
ConferenceSeed
Appalachian State Southern Conference 14–147–1016
CSU-Northridge Big Sky Conference 21–713–315
Clemson ACC 24–511–52
Connecticut Big East 27–417–11
Dartmouth Ivy League 19–811–314
Evansville Missouri Valley Conference 19–1011–713
Florida A&M MEAC 18–1114–415
Grambling State SWAC 25–416–012
Green Bay Midwestern Collegiate 19–913–114
Holy Cross Patriot League 21–711–114
Liberty Big South Conference 21–79–114
Louisiana Tech Sun Belt Conference 26–212–01
Northeastern America East 22–713–513
Old Dominion Colonial 26–316–02
Oral Roberts Mid-Continent 17–128–616
Purdue Big Ten 28–116–01
SMU WAC 19–1011–311
St. Francis (PA) Northeast Conference 18–1114–616
St. Joseph's Atlantic 10 29–714–211
St. Mary's (CA) West Coast Conference 26–610–412
St. Peter's MAAC 25–515–313
Stephen F. Austin Southland 17–1112–615
Tennessee SEC 28–213–11
Tennessee Tech Ohio Valley Conference 21–814–415
Texas Tech Big 12 28–314–22
Toledo MAC 25–514–26
Tulane Conference USA 24–512–46
UC-Santa Barbara Big West Conference 26–315–010
UCF Trans America 20–913–316
UCLA Pac-10 23–715–33

Qualifying teams – at-large

Thirty-four additional teams were selected to complete the sixty-four invitations. [8]

At-large Bids
  Record 
Qualifying SchoolConferenceRegular
Season
ConferenceSeed
University of Alabama Southeastern19–107–75
University of Arizona Pacific-1017–1012–66
Auburn University Southeastern19–88–65
Boston College Big East21–712–68
University of Cincinnati Conference USA22–812–412
Colorado State University Western Athletic31–214–02
Duke University Atlantic Coast24–615–13
Florida International University Sun Belt23–69–39
University of Florida Southeastern19–136–811
University of Georgia Southeastern23–69–53
University of Illinois Big Ten18–1110–67
Iowa State University Big 1222–712–44
University of Kansas Big 1222–911–59
University of Kentucky Southeastern20–107–76
University of Louisville Conference USA21–1012–410
Louisiana State University Southeastern20–710–44
University of Maine America East23–617–110
Marquette University Conference USA21–712–48
Mississippi State University Southeastern17–107–77
Missouri State University Missouri Valley24–615–37
University of Nebraska–Lincoln Big 1221–118–811
University of North Carolina Atlantic Coast26–711–54
North Carolina State University Atlantic Coast16–119–710
University of Notre Dame Big East25–415–35
Ohio State University Big Ten17–119–79
University of Oregon Pacific-1024–515–35
Pennsylvania State University Big Ten21–712–48
Rutgers University Big East26–517–13
Santa Clara University West Coast22–611–313
Stanford University Pacific-1018–1114–47
University of Texas at Austin Big 1216–1110–612
University of Virginia Atlantic Coast20–812–49
Virginia Tech Atlantic 1026–215–14
Xavier University Atlantic 1023–811–58

Bids by conference

Thirty conferences earned an automatic bid. In seventeen cases, the automatic bid was the only representative from the conference. Thirty-four additional at-large teams were selected from thirteen of the conferences. [8]

BidsConferenceTeams
8 Southeastern Tennessee, Alabama, Auburn, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, LSU, Mississippi St.
5 Atlantic Coast Clemson, Duke, North Carolina, North Carolina St., Virginia
5 Big 12 Texas Tech, Iowa St., Kansas, Nebraska, Texas
4 Big East Connecticut, Boston College, Notre Dame, Rutgers
4 Big Ten Purdue, Illinois, Ohio St., Penn St.
4 Conference USA Tulane, Cincinnati, Louisville, Marquette
4 Pacific-10 UCLA, Arizona, Oregon, Stanford
3 Atlantic 10 St. Joseph's, Virginia Tech, Xavier
2 America East Northeastern, Maine
2 Missouri Valley Evansville, Missouri St.
2 Sun Belt Louisiana Tech, FIU
2 West Coast St. Mary's, Santa Clara
2 Western Athletic SMU, Colorado St.
1 Big Sky Cal St. Northridge
1 Big South Liberty
1 Big West UC Santa Barb.
1 Colonial Old Dominion
1 Ivy Dartmouth
1 Metro Atlantic St. Peter's
1 Mid-American Toledo
1 Mid-Continent Oral Roberts
1 Mid-Eastern Florida A&M
1 Midwestern Collegiate Green Bay
1 Northeast St. Francis (PA)
1 Ohio Valley Tennessee Tech
1 Patriot Holy Cross
1 Southern Appalachian St.
1 Southland Stephen F. Austin
1 Southwestern Grambling
1 Trans America UCF

First and second rounds

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Norfolk
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Knoxville
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Durham
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Blacksburg
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Athens
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Clemson
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Storrs
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Ames
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Chapel Hill
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Piscataway
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West Lafayette
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Lubbock
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Baton Rouge
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Los Angeles
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Ruston
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Fort Collins
1999 NCAA NCAA first and second round venues

In 1999, the field remained at 64 teams. The teams were seeded, and assigned to four geographic regions, with seeds 1-16 in each region. In Round 1, seeds 1 and 16 faced each other, as well as seeds 2 and 15, seeds 3 and 14, seeds 4 and 13, seeds 5 and 12, seeds 6 and 11, seeds 7 and 10, and seeds 8 and 9. In the first two rounds, the top four seeds were given the opportunity to host the first-round game. In all cases, the higher seed accepted the opportunity.

The following table lists the region, host school, venue and the sixteen first and second round locations: [9]

RegionRndHostVenueCityState
East 1&2 Old Dominion University Old Dominion University Fieldhouse Norfolk Virginia
East 1&2 University of Tennessee Thompson–Boling Arena Knoxville Tennessee
East 1&2 Duke University Cameron Indoor Stadium Durham North Carolina
East 1&2 Virginia Tech Cassell Coliseum Blacksburg Virginia
Mideast 1&2 University of Georgia Georgia Coliseum (Stegeman Coliseum) Athens Georgia
Mideast 1&2 Clemson University Littlejohn Coliseum Clemson South Carolina
Mideast 1&2 University of Connecticut Harry A. Gampel Pavilion Storrs Connecticut
Mideast 1&2 Iowa State University Hilton Coliseum Ames Iowa
Midwest 1&2 University of North Carolina Carmichael Auditorium Chapel Hill North Carolina
Midwest 1&2 Rutgers University Louis Brown Athletic Center Piscataway New Jersey
Midwest 1&2 Purdue University Mackey Arena West Lafayette Indiana
Midwest 1&2 Texas Tech University Lubbock Municipal Coliseum Lubbock Texas
West 1&2 Louisiana State University LSU Assembly Center (Pete Maravich Assembly Center) Baton Rouge Louisiana
West 1&2 University of California, Los Angeles Pauley Pavilion Los Angeles California
West 1&2 Louisiana Tech University Thomas Assembly Center Ruston Louisiana
West 1&2 Colorado State University Moby Arena Fort Collins Colorado

Regionals and Final Four

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Los Angeles
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Cincinnati
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Greensboro
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San Jose
1999 NCAA regionals and Final Four

The Regionals, named for the general location, were held from March 20 to March 22 at these sites:

Each regional winner advanced to the Final Four held March 26 and March 28 in San Jose, California at the San Jose Arena

Bids by state

The sixty-four teams came from thirty-one states. California had the most teams with six bids. Nineteen states did not have any teams receiving bids. [8]

NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 1999 NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 1999.svg
NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 1999
BidsStateTeams
6 California Cal St. Northridge, St. Mary's, UC Santa Barb., UCLA, Santa Clara, Stanford
4 Florida Florida A&M, UCF, FIU, Florida
4 Louisiana Grambling, Louisiana Tech, Tulane, LSU
4 North Carolina Appalachian St., Duke, North Carolina, North Carolina St.
4 Ohio Toledo, Cincinnati, Ohio St., Xavier
4 Texas SMU, Stephen F. Austin, Texas Tech, Texas
4 Virginia Liberty, Old Dominion, Virginia, Virginia Tech
3 Indiana Evansville, Purdue, Notre Dame
3 Massachusetts Holy Cross, Northeastern, Boston College
2 Alabama Alabama, Auburn
2 Kentucky Kentucky, Louisville
2 New Jersey St. Peter's, Rutgers
3 Pennsylvania St. Joseph's, Penn St., St Francis
2 Tennessee Tennessee, Tennessee Tech
2 Wisconsin Green Bay, Marquette
1 Arizona Arizona
1 Colorado Colorado St.
1 Connecticut Connecticut
1 Georgia Georgia
1 Illinois Illinois
1 Iowa Iowa St.
1 Kansas Kansas
1 Maine Maine
1 Mississippi Mississippi St.
1 Missouri Missouri St.
1 Nebraska Nebraska
1 New Hampshire Dartmouth
1 Oklahoma Oral Roberts
1 Oregon Oregon
1 South Carolina Clemson

Brackets

Data source [1]

East Region – Greensboro, North Carolina

First round
March 12 and 13
Second round
March 14 and 15
Regional semifinals
March 20
Regional finals
March 22
            
1 at Tennessee 113
16 Appalachian State 54
1 Tennessee89
8 Boston College 62
8 Boston College 72
9 Ohio State 59
1 Tennessee68
4 Virginia Tech 52
5 Auburn 69
12 Texas 61
5 Auburn 61
4 Virginia Tech76
4 at Virginia Tech 73
13 St. Peter's 48
1 Tennessee 63
3 Duke69
6 Tulane 72
11 Saint Joseph's 83
11 Saint Joseph's 60
3 Duke66
3 at Duke 79
14 Holy Cross 51
3 Duke76
2 Old Dominion 63
7 Stanford 58
10 Maine 60
10 Maine 62
2 Old Dominion72
2 at Old Dominion 74
15 Tennessee Tech 48

Mideast Region – Cincinnati

First round
March 12 and 13
Second round
March 14 and 15
Regional semifinals
March 20
Regional finals
March 22
            
1 at Connecticut 97
16 St. Francis (PA) 46
1 Connecticut86
8 Xavier 84
8 Xavier 85
9 Florida International 71
1 Connecticut 58
4 Iowa State64
5 Oregon 65
12 Cincinnati 56
5 Oregon 70
4 Iowa State85
4 at Iowa State 74
13 Santa Clara 61
4 Iowa State 71
3 Georgia89
6 Toledo 76
11 SMU 91
11 SMU 55
3 Georgia68
3 at Georgia 73
14 Liberty 52
3 Georgia67
2 Clemson 54
7 Illinois 69
10 Louisville 67
7 Illinois 51
2 Clemson63
2 at Clemson 76
15 Florida A&M 45

Midwest Region – Normal, Illinois

First round
March 12 and 13
Second round
March 14 and 15
Regional semifinals
March 20
Regional finals
March 22
            
1 at Purdue 68
16 Oral Roberts 48
1 Purdue55
9 Kansas 41
8 Marquette 58
9 Kansas 64
1 Purdue82
4 North Carolina 59
5 Alabama 80
12 Grambling 68
5 Alabama 56
4 North Carolina70
4 at North Carolina 64
13 Northeastern 55
1 Purdue75
3 Rutgers 62
6 Arizona 87(ot)
11 Florida 84
6 Arizona 47
3 Rutgers90
3 at Rutgers 84
14 Dartmouth 70
3 Rutgers53
2 Texas Tech 42
7 Mississippi State 57
10 NC State 76
10 NC State 78
2 Texas Tech85
2 at Texas Tech 80
15 Stephen F. Austin 54

West Region – Los Angeles

First round
March 12 and 13
Second round
March 14 and 15
Regional semifinals
March 20
Regional finals
March 22
            
1 at Louisiana Tech 90
16 UCF 48
1 Louisiana Tech79
8 Penn State 62
8 Penn State 82
9 Virginia 69
1 Louisiana Tech73
4 LSU 52
5 Notre Dame 61
12 St. Mary's (CA) 57
5 Notre Dame 64
4 LSU74
4 at LSU 78
13 Evansville 69
1 Louisiana Tech88
3 UCLA 62
6 Kentucky 98
11 Nebraska 92
6 Kentucky 63
3 UCLA87
3 at UCLA 76
14 Green Bay 69
3 UCLA77
2 Colorado State 68
7 SW Missouri State 72
10 UC Santa Barbara 70
7 SW Missouri State 70
2 Colorado State86
2 at Colorado State 71
15 Cal. St-Northridge 59

Final Four – San Jose, California

National semifinals
March 26
National championship
March 28
      
E3 Duke81
ME3 Georgia 69
E3 Duke 45
MW1 Purdue62
MW1 Purdue77
W1 Louisiana Tech 63

E-East; ME-Mideast; MW-Midwest; W-West.

Record by conference

Fourteen conferences had more than one bid, or at least one win in NCAA Tournament play: [8]

Conference# of BidsRecordWin %Round
of 32
Sweet
Sixteen
Elite
Eight
Final
Four
Championship
Game
Southeastern 8 12–8 .600 6 3 2 1
Atlantic Coast 5 10–5 .667 4 3 1 1 1
Big 12 5 6–5 .545 3 2 1
Big Ten 4 8–3 .727 3 1 1 1 1
Big East 4 7–4 .636 4 2 1
Pacific-10 4 5–4 .556 3 1 1
Conference USA 4 0–4
Atlantic 10 3 4–3 .571 3 1
Sun Belt 2 4–2 .667 1 1 1 1
Western Athletic 2 3–2 .600 2 1
America East 2 1–2 .333 1
Missouri Valley 2 1–2 .333 1
West Coast 2 0–2
Colonial 1 2–1 .667 1 1

Sixteen conferences went 0-1: Big Sky Conference, Big South Conference, Big West Conference, Ivy League, MAAC, MAC, Mid-Continent, MEAC, Midwestern Collegiate, Northeast Conference, Ohio Valley Conference, Patriot League, Southern Conference, Southland, SWAC, and Trans America [8]

All-Tournament team

Game officials

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 "Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book". NCAA. February 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-17.
  2. Masilak, Jim. "Duke stuns Lady Vols, 69-63". The Daily Beacon. Archived from the original on 2013-04-12. Retrieved 18 Feb 2013.
  3. "Rocky Toppled – Duke stuns three-time defending champion Tennessee". CNN SI. March 24, 1999.
  4. AMORE, DOM (March 15, 1999). "CONNECTICUT 86, XAVIER 84 Biggest upset of all escapes Muskies". Cincinnati.com. Retrieved 18 Feb 2013.
  5. "NCAA Women's Tournament Recap (Xavier-Connecticut)". CNNSI. March 15, 1999. Retrieved 18 Feb 2013.
  6. "Devils take down Georgia". CNN SI. April 1, 1999. Retrieved 18 Feb 2013.
  7. Kent, Milton (March 27, 1999). "Gritty Purdue trips Techsters, 77-63". Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 18 Feb 2013.
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Nixon, Rick. "Official 2022 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 22 April 2012.
  9. "Attendance and Sites" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 19 March 2012.

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