1999 Oakland Raiders season

Last updated

1999 Oakland Raiders season
OwnerAl Davis
Head coach Jon Gruden
General manager Al Davis
Home field Network Associates Coliseum
Results
Record8–8
Division place4th AFC West
Playoff finishDid not qualify
Pro Bowlers Rich Gannon, QB
Tim Brown, WR
Darrell Russell, DT
Charles Woodson, CB

The 1999 Oakland Raiders season was the franchise's 30th season in the National Football League, the 40th overall, their 4th season since their return to Oakland, and the second season under head coach Jon Gruden. They matched their previous season's output of 8–8. [1] Thirteen of the team's sixteen games were decided by a touchdown or less, and none of the Raiders' eight losses were by more than a touchdown.

Contents

The season saw the team acquire quarterback Rich Gannon, who had his best seasons with the Raiders, being named MVP in 2002 and leading the team to a Super Bowl, that same season. His following two seasons after the Super Bowl were ruined by injuries and he was forced to retire in 2004. Gannon was named to four consecutive Pro Bowls (1999–2002) while playing for the Raiders.

Offseason

NFL draft

1999 Oakland Raiders draft
RoundPickPlayerPositionCollegeNotes
118 Matt Stinchcomb   Tackle Georgia
240 Tony Bryant   DE Florida
      Made roster  

Staff

1999 Oakland Raiders Coaching Staff

Head Coaches

Offensive Coaches

 

Defensive Coaches

Special Teams Coaches

Strength and Conditioning

Roster

1999 Oakland Raiders final roster
Quarterbacks

Running backs

Wide receivers

Tight ends

Offensive linemen

Defensive linemen

Linebackers

Defensive backs

Special teams

Reserve lists


Practice squad


Rookies in italics

Schedule

WeekDateOpponentResultTVAttendance
1September 12, 1999at Green Bay Packers L 28–24CBS
59,872
2September 19, 1999at Minnesota Vikings W 22–17CBS
64,080
3September 26, 1999 Chicago Bears W 24–17FOX
50,458
4October 3, 1999at Seattle Seahawks L 22–21ESPN
66,400
5October 10, 1999 Denver Broncos L 16–13CBS
55,704
6October 17, 1999at Buffalo Bills W 20–14CBS
71,113
7October 24, 1999 New York Jets W 24–23CBS
47,326
8October 31, 1999 Miami Dolphins L 16–9CBS
61,556
9Bye
10November 14, 1999 San Diego Chargers W 28–9CBS
43,353
11November 22, 1999at Denver Broncos L 27–21 OTABC
70,012
12November 28, 1999 Kansas City Chiefs L 37–34CBS
48,632
13December 5, 1999 Seattle Seahawks W 30–21CBS
44,716
14December 9, 1999at Tennessee Titans L 21–14ESPN
66,357
15December 19, 1999 Tampa Bay Buccaneers W 45–0FOX
46,395
16December 26, 1999at San Diego Chargers L 23–20CBS
63,846
17January 2, 2000at Kansas City Chiefs W 41–38 OTCBS
79,026

Standings

AFC West
WLTPCTPFPASTK
(3) Seattle Seahawks 970.563338298L1
Kansas City Chiefs 970.563390322L2
San Diego Chargers 880.500269316W2
Oakland Raiders 880.500390329W1
Denver Broncos 6100.375314318L1

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