2½ cents (World War II Dutch coin)

Last updated
2 12 cents
Value2 12 Dutch cents
Mass2 g
Diameter20 mm
EdgePlain
Composition100% Zn
Years of minting1941–1942
Obverse
Netherlands 2 1-2 cents 1941 obverse.jpg
DesignTwo swans' heads.
Lettering:
NEDERLAND
Reverse
Netherlands 2 1-2 cents 1941 reverse.jpg
Design Denomination, four waves, and grain.
Lettering
2 12ct 1941

The 2 12-cent coin minted in the Netherlands during World War II was made of zinc, and worth 140, or .025, of the Dutch guilder. It was designed by Nico de Haas, a Dutch national-socialist, and struck in 1941 and 1942.

Netherlands Constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Europe

The Netherlands is a country located in Northwestern Europe with some overseas territories. In Europe, it consists of 12 provinces that border Germany to the east, Belgium to the south, and the North Sea to the northwest, with maritime borders in the North Sea with Belgium, Germany and the United Kingdom. Together with three island territories in the Caribbean Sea—Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba—it forms a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The official language is Dutch, but a secondary official language in the province of Friesland is West Frisian.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 70 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

The Dutch guilder or fl. was the currency of the Netherlands from the 17th century until 2002, when it was replaced by the euro. Between 1999 and 2002, the guilder was officially a "national subunit" of the euro. However, physical payments could only be made in guilder, as no euro coins or banknotes were available. The Netherlands Antillean guilder is still in use in Curaçao and Sint Maarten, but this currency is distinct from the Dutch guilder. In 2004, the Surinamese guilder was replaced by the Surinamese dollar.

Mintage

YearMintageNotes
194127,600,000
1942

[1]

Related Research Articles

Dutch euro coins

Dutch euro coins currently use two designs by Erwin Olaf, both of which feature a portrait of King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands. The new designs began circulating in 2014. Dutch Euro coins minted from 1999 to 2013 feature a portrait of Queen Beatrix designed by Bruno Ninaber van Eyben. All coins share the 12 stars of the EU and the year of imprint in their design.

Ugandan shilling currency of Uganda

The shilling is the currency of Uganda. Officially divided into cents until 2013, the shilling now has no subdivision.

Netherlands Antillean guilder currency of the former Netherlands Antilles; now in use on Curaçao and Sint Maarten

The Netherlands Antillean guilder is the currency of Curaçao and Sint Maarten, which until 2010 formed the Netherlands Antilles along with Bonaire, Saba, and Sint Eustatius. It is subdivided into 100 cents. The guilder was replaced by the United States dollar on 1 January 2011 on Bonaire, Saba and Sint Eustatius. On Curaçao and Sint Maarten, the Netherlands Antillean guilder was proposed to be replaced by a new currency, the Caribbean guilder, but this has been stalled indefinitely by negotiations over the establishment of a separate central bank for Curaçao.

1 euro cent coin coin with value of one-hundredth of a euro

The 1 euro cent coin (€0.01) has a value of one hundredth of a euro and is composed of copper-covered steel. The coins of every Euro country have a common reverse and each has a country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not redesigned in 2007 as was the case with the higher-value coins.

2 euro cent coin Nada

The 2 euro cent coin (€0.02) has a value of one-fiftieth of a euro and is composed of copper-plated steel. All coins have a common reverse and country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not redesigned in 2007 as were the higher-value coins.

25 cents (World War II Dutch coin) World War II Dutch coin

The 25-cent piece was the highest-denomination coin minted in the Netherlands during World War II. Struck between 1941 and 1943, the 25-cent coin was worth 1/4, or 0.25, of a Dutch guilder. It was made entirely of zinc, and designed by Nico de Haas, a Dutch national-socialist. The respective mintage was of 34,600,000 (1941), (1942), 13,600,000 (1943).

10 cents (World War II Dutch coin)

The zinc 10-cent coin was minted in the Netherlands between 1941 and 1943 during World War II. It was worth 1/10, or .10, of the guilder, and designed by Nico de Haas, a Dutch national-socialist. The respective mintage was of 29,800,000 (1941), 95,600,000 (1942), 29,000,000 (1943).

The One guilder coin was a coin struck in the Kingdom of the Netherlands between 1818 and 2001. It remained in circulation until 2002 when the guilder currency was replaced by the euro. No guilder coins were minted in the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II.

Ecuadorian centavo coins were introduced in 2000 when Ecuador converted its currency from the sucre to the U.S. dollar. The coins are in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 centavos and are identical in size and value to their U.S. cent counterparts. They circulate within Ecuador alongside coins and banknotes from the USA. Although U.S. $1 coins are rarely used in the U.S., they are commonly used in Ecuador. Ecuador managed to introduce a $1 coin but finally decided to not release in common circulation, only in 2000 coin sets. Ecuador does not issue any banknotes, relying on U.S. issues.

5 cents (World War II Dutch coin)

The zinc 5-cent coin was minted in the Netherlands between 1941 and 1943 during World War II. It was worth 1/20, or .05, of the guilder, and designed by Nico de Haas, a Dutch national-socialist.

The half-cent coin was a Dutch coin used from 1818 to 1940. It was the smallest-denomination coin of the decimal Dutch guilder until its withdrawal from circulation after the German occupation of the Netherlands in 1940. It was nicknamed "Halfje", similar to the Kwartje.

Twenty-five cent coin (Netherlands)

The twenty-five cent was a coin worth a quarter of decimal Dutch guilder. It was used from the decimalisation of the currency in 1817 until the Netherlands adopted the euro as sole currency in 2002. The last minting was in 2001. The coin was the third-smallest denomination of the guilder when the currency was withdrawn, and the largest of a value less than one guilder.

During World War II, the Belgian government needed to mint coins using metal that would not be needed for the war effort. Therefore, silver coinage was discontinued and coins were instead minted using pure zinc.

<i>Dubbeltje</i>

A dubbeltje is a small former Dutch coin, originally made of silver, with a value of a tenth of a Dutch guilder. The 10-euro-cent coin is currently also called a dubbeltje in the Netherlands.

Five cent coin (Netherlands)

The Five cent coin was a coin struck in the Kingdom of the Netherlands between 1818 and 2001. Twenty stuivers equalled a Dutch Guilder.

The Half guilder coin was a silver coin struck in the Kingdom of the Netherlands between 1818 and 1930. The obverse featured a portrait of the Dutch reigning King or Queen. On the reverse was a crowned Dutch coat of arms between the value. All coins were minted in Utrecht except the year 1829 and 1830 that were minted in Brussels.

The Two and a half cent coin was struck in the Kingdom of the Netherlands between 1818 and 1942. All coins were minted in Utrecht.

One cent coin (Netherlands)

The one-cent coin was a coin struck in the Kingdom of the Netherlands between 1817 and 1980. The coin was worth 1 cent or ​1100 of a Dutch guilder.

The Three guilder coin was a silver coin struck in the Kingdom of the Netherlands between 1817 and 1832.

References

  1. "2½ Cents - Wilhelmina (German Occupation) - Netherlands - Numista". Numista. Retrieved 2013-01-20.Cite web requires |website= (help)