2000 IIHF World U18 Championships

Last updated
2000 IIHF World U18 Championship
2000 IIHF World U18 Championships.png
Tournament details
Host countryFlag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
DatesApril 14–24, 2000
Teams10
Venue(s)2 (in 2 host cities)
Final positions
Champions  Gold medal blank.svg Flag of Finland.svg  Finland (2nd title)
Runner-up  Silver medal blank.svg Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
Third place  Bronze medal blank.svg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Fourth placeFlag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Tournament statistics
Matches played31
Goals scored216 (6.97 per match)
Attendance33,988 (1,096 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Flag of Russia.svg Yegor Shastin
(11 points)
1999
2001

The 2000 IIHF World U18 Championships were held in Kloten and Weinfelden, Switzerland. The championships ran between April 14 and April 24, 2000. Games were played at Eishalle Schluefweg in Kloten and Sportanlage Güttingersreuti in Weinfelden. Finland defeated Russia 3–1 in the final to win the gold medal, while Sweden defeated Switzerland 7–1 to capture the bronze medal.

Contents

Championship results

Preliminary round

Group A

TeamGPWLTGFGAPTS
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 44002158
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 431018126
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 422015124
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 40318151
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 40316241

Group B

TeamGPWLTGFGAPTS
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 44003348
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 43101996
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 422012104
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 413013132
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 40404450

Relegation Round

TeamGPWLTGFGAPTS
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 32011755
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 32101644
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 311112133
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 30304270

Note: The following matches from the preliminary round carry forward to the relegation round:

Final round

 Quarterfinals  Semifinals  Final
              
   B1Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 4 
 A2Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 3  A2Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1  
 B3Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 0    B1Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 1
   B2Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 3
   A1Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2  
 B2Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 3  B2Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 4 Third place
 A3Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 0 A1Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 7
 A2Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1

Quarterfinals

April 21, 2000Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 30Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia Eishalle Schluefweg, Kloten
Attendance: 3,177
April 21, 2000Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 30Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Eishalle Schluefweg, Kloten
Attendance: 968

Semifinals

April 22, 2000Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 24Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Eishalle Schluefweg, Kloten
Attendance: 864
April 22, 2000Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 41Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Eishalle Schluefweg, Kloten
Attendance: 4,131

Fifth place game

April 24, 2000Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 43 (SO)Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Sportanlage Güttingersreuti, Weinfelden
Attendance: 300

Bronze medal game

April 24, 2000Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 71Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Eishalle Schluefweg, Kloten
Attendance: 3,633

Gold medal game

April 24, 2000Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 13Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Eishalle Schluefweg, Kloten
Attendance: 3,288

Final standings

Rk.Team
Gold medal icon.svgFlag of Finland.svg  Finland
Silver medal icon.svgFlag of Russia.svg  Russia
Bronze medal icon.svgFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
4Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
5Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia
6Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic
7Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
8Flag of the United States.svg  United States
9Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
10Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus

Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus is relegated to Division I for the 2001 IIHF World U18 Championships.

Scoring leaders

PlayerCountryGPGAPtsPIM
Yegor Shastin Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 674114
Sven Helfenstein Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 756112
Jens Karlsson Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 654920
Marian Gaborik Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 662812
Tuomo Ruutu Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 76280
Martin Samuelsson Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 63586
Alexandr Svitov Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 63588
Janne Jokila Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 73588
Pavel Vorobiev Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 626810
Thibaut Monnet Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 74376

Source: IIHF [1]

Goaltending leaders

(minimum 40% team's total ice time)

PlayerCountryMINSGASv%GAASO
Kari Lehtonen Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 307:11996.301.761
Travis Weber Flag of the United States.svg  United States 150:39296.000.801
Andrei Medvedev Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 180:00495.601.330
Sergei Mylnikov Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 180:00495.121.331
Henrik Lundqvist Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 240:00993.882.250

Source: IIHF [2]

Group B

First round

Group A
TeamsJPNNORITADANTorePkt.
1. Japan3:23:33:09:55:1
2. Norway2:38:19:419:84:2
3. Italy3:31:85:49:153:3
4. Denmark0:34:94:58:170:6
Group B
TeamsAUTLATPOLFRATorePkt.
1. Austria3:35:46:114:85:1
2. Latvia3:34:45:312:104:2
3. Poland4:54:45:413:133:3
4. France1:63:54:58:160:6

Final round

5th-8th place
TeamsDANITAPOLFRATorePkt.
1. Denmark(4:5)9:45:318:124:2
2. Italy(5:4)2:34:111:84:2
3. Poland4:93:2(5:4)12:154:2
4. France3:51:4(4:5)8:140:6
1st-4th place
TeamsNORAUTLATJPNTorePkt.
1. Norway3:25:2(2:3)10:74:2
2. Austria2:3(3:3)5:210:83:3
3. Latvia2:5(3:3)5:210:103:3
4. Japan(3:2)2:52:57:122:4

Final ranking

RFTeam
1Norway
2Austria
3Latvia
4Japan
5Denmark
6Italy
7Poland
8France

European Championships Division I

First round

Group A
TeamsESTHUNLTUESPTorePkt.
1. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 6:57:18:121:76:0
2. Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 5:69:310:424:134:2
3. Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 1:73:910:714:232:4
4. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 1:84:107:1012:280:6
Group B
TeamsKAZSLOGBRROMTorePkt.
1. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 6:48:018:132:56:0
2. Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 4:68:39:021:94:2
3. Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 0:83:87:210:182:4
4. Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 1:180:92:73:340:6

Placing round

7th place
24. March 2000 Maribor Flag of Romania.svg  Romania Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 7:2 (2:0,4:1,1:1)
5th place
24. March 2000 Maribor Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 5:4 n.P. (1:2,2:1,1:1,0:0,1:0)
3rd place
24. March 2000 Maribor Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 13:0 (4:0,4:0,5:0)
Final
24. March 2000 Maribor Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 4:2 (1:1,2:1,1:0)

European Championships Division II Qualification

Group A (in Reykjavík, Iceland)

26. November 1999 Reykjavík Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 13:2 (2:0,7:0,4:2)
27. November 1999 Reykjavík Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 12:3 (3:0,2:3,7:0)

Group B (in Sofia, Bulgaria)

4. March 2000 Sofia Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 3:1 (0:0,1:1,2:0)

European Championships Division II

First round

Group A
TeamsCROBULLUXTorePkt.
1. Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 18:020:038:04:0
2. Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 0:183:23:202:2
3. Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 0:202:32:230:4
Group B
TeamsYUGISRISLTorePkt.
1. Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg  FR Yugoslavia 8:65:413:104:0
2. Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 6:84:210:102:2
3. Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 4:52:46:90:4
Group C
TeamsNEDBELRSATorePkt.
1. Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 3:19:212:34:0
2. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 1:37:18:42:2
3. Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 2:91:73:160:4

Placing round

7th-9th place
TeamsRSALUXISLTorePkt.
1. Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 3:13:36:43:1
2. Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 1:38:59:82:2
3. Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 3:35:88:111:3
4th-6th place
TeamsBELISRBULTorePkt.
1. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 5:38:013:34:0
2. Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 3:57:410:92:2
3. Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 0:84:74:150:4
1st-3rd place
TeamsCRONEDYUGTorePkt.
1. Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 8:211:419:64:0
2. Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 2:88:110:92:2
3. Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg  FR Yugoslavia 4:111:85:190:4

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References

  1. "Scoring Leaders" (PDF). IIHF. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  2. "Goalkeepers". IIHF.com. Retrieved 28 June 2016.