2001 American League Division Series

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2001 American League Division Series
2001 American League Division Series (emblem).jpg
Teams
Team (Wins)ManagerSeason
Seattle Mariners (3) Lou Piniella 116–46, .716, GA: 14
Cleveland Indians (2) Charlie Manuel 91–71, .562, GA: 6
DatesOctober 9–15
Television Fox (Games 1, 3, 5)
Fox Family (Games 2, 4)
TV announcers Josh Lewin, Rex Hudler
Radio ESPN
Teams
Team (Wins)ManagerSeason
New York Yankees (3) Joe Torre 95–65, .594, GA: 13½
Oakland Athletics (2) Art Howe 102–60, .630, GB: 14
DatesOctober 10–15
Television Fox
TV announcers Joe Buck, Tim McCarver (Games 1–2)
Thom Brennaman, Steve Lyons (Games 3–5)
Radio ESPN
Umpires Steve Rippley, Ted Barrett, Kerwin Danley, Jerry Layne, Mark Hirschbeck, Ron Kulpa (Mariners–Indians, Games 1–2, 5; Yankees–Athletics, Games 3–4)
Dana DeMuth, Jeff Nelson, Paul Schrieber, Rick Reed, Ed Rapuano, Greg Gibson (Yankees–Athletics, Games 1–2, 5; Mariners-Indians, Games 3–4)
  2000 ALDS 2002  
2001 ALCS                 2001 World Series

The 2001 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2001 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 9, and ended on Monday, October 15, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

In Major League Baseball, the American League Division Series (ALDS) determines which two teams from the American League will advance to the American League Championship Series. The Division Series consists of two best-of-five series, featuring the three division winners and the winner of the wild-card play-off.

Contents

The Seattle Mariners' 2001 season was the 25th since the franchise's inception. The Mariners finished with a 116–46 (.716) record, tying the major league record for wins set by the 1906 Chicago Cubs, and setting the record for wins by an American League team. Of those wins, 59 were by four or more runs, a record for the number of games won by such a margin. They also led the majors in both runs scored and fewest runs allowed.

2001 Cleveland Indians season Major League Baseball season

The 2001 Cleveland Indians season was the 101st season for the franchise.

2001 New York Yankees season Major League Baseball season

The New York Yankees' 2001 season was the 99th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 95-65 finishing 13.5 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe Torre. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. Roger Clemens had sixteen straight wins, tying an American League mark shared by Walter Johnson, Lefty Grove, Schoolboy Rowe, and Smoky Joe Wood. Clemens would finish the season with the AL Cy Young Award and become the first pitcher to win six Cy Young Awards.

[1]

The Seattle Mariners and New York Yankees went on to meet in the AL Championship Series (ALCS). The Yankees became the American League champion, and lost to the National League champion Arizona Diamondbacks in the 2001 World Series.

2001 American League Championship Series

The 2001 American League Championship Series (ALCS) was a rematch of the 2000 ALCS between the New York Yankees, who had come off a dramatic comeback against the Oakland Athletics in the Division Series after being down two games to zero, and the Seattle Mariners, who had won their Division Series against the Cleveland Indians in five games. The series had additional poignancy, coming immediately after downtown New York City was devastated by the events of September 11, 2001. The Yankees would go on to lose to the Arizona Diamondbacks in the World Series.

2001 National League Championship Series

The 2001 National League Championship Series (NLCS) saw the Arizona Diamondbacks defeat the Atlanta Braves in five games to win the National League pennant in the franchise's fourth year of existence. The Diamondbacks went on to defeat the New York Yankees in seven games to win the World Series.

The 2001 Arizona Diamondbacks, in their fourth year of existence, looked to improve on their 2000 season. They had to contend in what was a strong National League West Division.

Matchups

Seattle Mariners vs. Cleveland Indians

Seattle won the series, 3–2.

GameDateScoreLocationTimeAttendance 
1October 9Cleveland Indians – 5, Seattle Mariners – 0 Safeco Field 3:0548,033 [2]  
2October 11Cleveland Indians – 1, Seattle Mariners – 5Safeco Field2:4148,052 [3]  
3October 13Seattle Mariners – 2, Cleveland Indians – 17 Jacobs Field 3:2445,069 [4]  
4October 14Seattle Mariners – 6, Cleveland Indians – 2Jacobs Field3:1645,025 [5]  
5October 15Cleveland Indians – 1, Seattle Mariners – 3Safeco Field3:1847,867 [6]

New York Yankees vs. Oakland Athletics

New York won the series, 3–2.

GameDateScoreLocationTimeAttendance 
1October 10Oakland Athletics – 5, New York Yankees – 3 Yankee Stadium (I) 3:4556,697 [7]  
2October 11Oakland Athletics – 2, New York Yankees – 0Yankee Stadium (I)3:2456,684 [8]  
3October 13New York Yankees – 1, Oakland Athletics – 0 Network Associates Coliseum 2:4255,861 [9]  
4October 14New York Yankees – 9, Oakland Athletics – 2Network Associates Coliseum4:1343,681 [10]  
5October 15Oakland Athletics – 3, New York Yankees – 5Yankee Stadium (I)3:2356,642 [11]

Seattle vs. Cleveland

Game 1, October 9

Safeco Field in Seattle, Washington

Team123456789 R H E
Cleveland0003010105111
Seattle000000000061
WP: Bartolo Colón (1–0)   LP: Freddy García (0–1)
Home runs:
CLE: Ellis Burks (1)
SEA: None

In Game 1, the Indians held the Mariners scoreless. Bartolo Colón pitched brilliantly, giving up six hits and no runs in eight innings while fanning 10. The highlight for Seattle was the hitting performance of Ichiro Suzuki, who went 3 for 4 in his playoff debut. Roberto Alomar doubled off Freddy Garcia to leadoff the fourth, then scored on Juan Gonzalez's single. A single and walk loaded the bases before back-to-back RBI singles by Travis Fryman and Marty Cordova made it 3–0 Indians. In the sixth, three consecutive one-out singles made it 4–0. Ellis Burks's leadoff home run in the eighth off Jose Paniagua made it 5–0, the final as they took a 1–0 series lead.

Ichiro Suzuki Japanese baseball player

Ichiro Suzuki, often referred to mononymously as Ichiro, is a Japanese former professional baseball outfielder who played 28 seasons combined in top-level professional leagues. He spent the bulk of his career with two teams: nine seasons with the Orix Blue Wave of Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) in Japan, where he began his career, and 14 with the Seattle Mariners of Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States. After playing the first 12 years of his MLB career for the Mariners, Ichiro played two and a half seasons with the New York Yankees before signing with the Miami Marlins. Ichiro played three seasons with the Marlins before returning to the Mariners in 2018. Ichiro established a number of batting records, including MLB's single-season record for hits with 262. He achieved 10 consecutive 200-hit seasons, the longest streak by any player in history. Between his major league career in both Japan and the United States, Ichiro has the most hits by any player in top-tier professional leagues. He also has recorded the most hits of all Japanese-born players in MLB history.

Roberto Alomar Puerto Rican baseball player

Roberto "Robbie" Alomar Velázquez is a Puerto Rican former Major League Baseball (MLB) player who played for the San Diego Padres, Toronto Blue Jays, Baltimore Orioles, Cleveland Indians, New York Mets, Chicago White Sox, and Arizona Diamondbacks (1988–2004). He is regarded as one of the greatest second basemen and all-around players of all time. During his career, the 12-time All-Star won more Gold Glove Awards for his defense (10) than any other second baseman in baseball history, in addition to winning four Silver Slugger Awards for his hitting. Among second basemen, he ranks third in games played (2,320), fifth in stolen bases (474), sixth in plate appearances (10,400), seventh in doubles (504) and assists (6,524), and eighth in hits (2,724), runs (1,508), at bats (9,073), and double plays turned (1,407). In 2011, Alomar was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, becoming the first Hall of Fame member to be depicted as a Blue Jays player on his plaque.

Juan Alberto González Vázquez is a former Major League Baseball outfielder. During his 16 years in the league, González played for four teams, but is most identified with the Texas Rangers baseball club. One of the premier run producers and most feared hitters of the 1990s and early 2000s, González hit over 40 home runs five times and amassed at least 100 runs batted in eight times. He also had a batting average of .310 or higher in five seasons. In his career as a whole, González averaged an impressive 42 home runs, 135 RBI, and 81 extra-base hits per 162 games, placing him well within the top ten all-time in these season-adjusted statistics.

Game 2, October 11

Safeco Field in Seattle, Washington

Team123456789 R H E
Cleveland000000100160
Seattle40001000X560
WP: Jamie Moyer (1–0)   LP: Chuck Finley (0–1)
Home runs:
CLE: None
SEA: Mike Cameron (1), Edgar Martínez (1), David Bell (1)

In the first inning, Seattle made up for Game 1 by scoring four runs in the first inning, headlined by two two-run blasts by Mike Cameron and Edgar Martínez. David Bell helped the cause with an insurance homer in the fifth. Jamie Moyer kept the Indians at bay with one run in six innings, and the trio of Jeff Nelson, Arthur Rhodes, and Kazuhiro Sasaki sealed the deal out of the bullpen. The Indians scored their only run in the seventh on a bases-loaded double play from Marty Cordova off Jeff Nelson.

Arthur Rhodes American baseball player

Arthur Lee Rhodes, Jr. is a former Major League Baseball left-handed relief pitcher.

Kazuhiro "Daimajin" Sasaki is a former Nippon Professional Baseball and Major League Baseball right-handed relief pitcher. He played his entire NPB career with the Yokohama Taiyo Whales / Yokohama BayStars. Sasaki played his entire MLB career with the Seattle Mariners (2000–2003).

Martin Kevin Cordova is an American former professional baseball left fielder, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Minnesota Twins, Toronto Blue Jays, Cleveland Indians, and Baltimore Orioles. He was born in Las Vegas, Nevada. Before embarking on a major league career, Cordova played six seasons in the minor leagues.

Game 3, October 13

Jacobs Field in Cleveland, Ohio

Team123456789 R H E
Seattle100000100273
Cleveland22401305X17190
WP: CC Sabathia (1–0)   LP: Aaron Sele (0–1)
Home runs:
SEA: None
CLE: Juan González (1), Kenny Lofton (1), Jim Thome (1)

The Mariners drew first blood early on after a bases-loaded walk by John Olerud off CC Sabathia drove in a run, but Seattle would not score again until the seventh on Ichiro Suzuki's RBI single with two on. Sabathia pitched six innings while four Indian relieves held the Mariners scoreless over the final three innings. In the bottom of the first, a one-out single by Omar Vizquel off Aaron Sele was followed by an RBI double by Roberto Alomar and RBI single by Juan González. Next inning, an error and single was followed by Vizquel's two-run triple, both runs unearned. Next inning, reliever Paul Abbott allowed a leadoff home run to Gonzalez, then after two strikeouts and two singles, Einar Diaz drove in a run with a single. A walk loaded the bases before Vizquel's single and Alomar's walk made it 8–1. Abbott pitched a scoreless fourth before allowing a home run to Kenny Lofton in the fifth. Next inning, Jim Thome's leadoff home run made it 10–1. After walking two, John Halama relieved Abbott and allowed an RBI single to Jolbert Cabrera and sacrifice fly to Lofton. Sele was charged with four runs on five hits in two innings while Abbott was charged with eight runs on nine hits and five walks in three innings, but the Indians piled on in the eighth off Jose Paniagua, who after getting two outs, loaded the bases on a hit-by-pitch and two walks. Vizquel cleared them with a double before back-to-back RBI doubles by Alomar and Gonzalez capped the scoring at 17–2. Up two games to one in this series, the Indians were ready to pull one of the greatest upsets in sports history.

John Olerud American baseball player

John Garrett Olerud, nicknamed Johnny O and Big Rude, is a left-handed American former Major League Baseball first baseman. Olerud played with the Toronto Blue Jays (1989–96), New York Mets (1997–99), Seattle Mariners (2000–04), New York Yankees (2004), and Boston Red Sox (2005).

Omar Vizquel Venezuelan baseball player and coach

Omar Enrique Vizquel González, nicknamed "Little O", is a Venezuelan former professional baseball shortstop. During his 24-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career, Vizquel played for the Seattle Mariners, Cleveland Indians, San Francisco Giants, Texas Rangers, Chicago White Sox, and Toronto Blue Jays. In Venezuela he played for Leones del Caracas. From 2014 to 2017, he was the Detroit Tigers' first-base, infield and baserunning coach.

Aaron Sele baseball player

Aaron Helmer Sele is an American former Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher who is currently a special assignment scout for the Chicago Cubs.

Game 4, October 14

Jacobs Field in Cleveland, Ohio

Team123456789 R H E
Seattle0000003126110
Cleveland010000100252
WP: Freddy García (1–1)   LP: Bartolo Colón (1–1)
Home runs:
SEA: Edgar Martínez (2)
CLE: Juan González (2)

The Mariners, in a do-or-die spot, called on Freddy García to go up against Bartolo Colón in a Game 1 rematch. Garcia allowed a leadoff home run to Juan Gonzalez in the second while Colon pitched six shutout innings, but allowed two walks and a single to load the bases in the seventh. A sacrifice fly by David Bell tied the game, then back-to-back RBI singles by Ichiro Suzuki, and Mark McLemore put the Mariners up 3–1. Travis Fryman's groundout with runners on first and third off Jeff Nelson cut the lead to 3–2, but Seattle got that run back on Mike Cameron's RBI double in the eighth off Danys Baez, then Edgar Martínez's two-run home run off Paul Shuey in the ninth put the Mariners up 6–2. Kazuhiro Sasaki retired the Indians in order in the bottom of the inning, forcing a Game 5 in Seattle.

Game 5, October 15

Safeco Field in Seattle, Washington

Team123456789 R H E
Cleveland001000000140
Seattle02000010X391
WP: Jamie Moyer (2–0)   LP: Chuck Finley (0–2)   Sv: Kazuhiro Sasaki (1)

In a must-win game for both sides, Seattle came out on top and advanced to the ALCS for the third time in their history, and avenged their loss to the Indians in the 1995 ALCS. The difference came in the second inning, when Mark McLemore knocked in two runs on a bases-loaded single off Chuck Finley. Jamie Moyer got his second win of the series by pitching six innings while giving up only one run on Kenny Lofton's RBI single with two on in the third. Edgar Martínez's RBI single in the seventh off Ricardo Rincon scored Ichiro Suzuki from second and put the Mariners up 3–1, the final.

For the Indians, it marked the third time in six seasons they had lost the ALDS, following defeats in 1996 and 1999. Cleveland, a perennial playoff team throughout the late 1990s, would not return to the postseason until 2007.

To date, this is the Mariners most recent playoff series win.

Composite box

2001 ALDS (3–2): Seattle Mariners over Cleveland Indians

Team123456789 R H E
Seattle Mariners 52001051216395
Cleveland Indians 23531426026453
Total attendance: 234,046  Average attendance: 46,809

New York vs. Oakland

Game 1, October 10

Yankee Stadium (I) in Bronx, New York

Team123456789 R H E
Oakland1001001205101
New York0000100203101
WP: Mark Mulder (1–0)   LP: Roger Clemens (0–1)   Sv: Jason Isringhausen (1)
Home runs:
OAK: Terrence Long 2 (2), Jason Giambi (1)
NYY: Tino Martinez (1)

Roger Clemens, coming off a 20–3 regular season record, struggled in Game 1, lasting four innings while giving up two runs. Johnny Damon singled to lead off the first, stole second, moved to third on a groundout, and scored on Jason Giambi's sacrifice fly. Terrence Long then homered in the fourth.

The Yankees got on the board in the fifth when Alfonso Soriano singled with two outs off Mark Mulder, stole second, and scored on Chuck Knoblauch's single.

Sterling Hitchcock, Clemens' replacement, gave up two more runs, home runs to Jason Giambi in the seventh and Terrence Long's second of the game in the eighth. Jay Witasick relieved Hitchcock and walked Ramón Hernández. Frank Menechino hit into a forceout, moved to third on Damon's single and scored on Miguel Tejada's sacrifice fly.

The Yankees trailed 5–1 in the bottom of the eighth when Bernie Williams singled with one out off Jim Mecir, then Tino Martinez blasted a two-run home run that brought them within two. Jason Isringhausen, however, sat the Yankees down in order in the bottom of the ninth for Oakland.

Game 2, October 11

Yankee Stadium (I) in Bronx, New York

Team123456789 R H E
Oakland000100001290
New York000000000071
WP: Tim Hudson (1–0)   LP: Andy Pettitte (0–1)   Sv: Jason Isringhausen (2)
Home runs:
OAK: Ron Gant (1)
NYY: None

With Paul McCartney in the crowd, Andy Pettitte pitched well in Game 2, giving up one run in six innings, but Tim Hudson pitched better, pitching eight shutout innings. Oakland scored first on a Ron Gant homer in the fourth---just as McCartney was shown on tv---and tacked on an insurance run off Mariano Rivera in the top of the ninth when Johnny Damon tripled with one out and scored on Scott Brosius's error. Jason Isringhausen got the save for the second straight night as the Yankees got the first two runners on base before wasting three opportunities to tie or win it.

The Yankees were now in a two games to none hole and the Athletics were just one win away from advancing to the ALCS for the first time since 1992.

Game 3, October 13

Network Associates Coliseum in Oakland, California

Team123456789 R H E
New York000010000120
Oakland000000000061
WP: Mike Mussina (1–0)   LP: Barry Zito (0–1)   Sv: Mariano Rivera (1)
Home runs:
NYY: Jorge Posada (1)
OAK: None

This series is notable for a defensive play in the seventh inning of Game 3. With Oakland leading the five-game series two games to none, on the verge of completing a sweep, the Yankees took a 1–0 lead into the bottom of the seventh inning behind a strong performance from Mike Mussina and Jorge Posada's home run in the fifth (Shane Spencer followed with a double for the Yankees' only other hit of the game). With two outs and Jeremy Giambi on first base, Terrence Long hit a line drive into the right field corner. With Giambi rounding third base, right fielder Shane Spencer's throw missed both cut-off men. It appeared that Giambi would score easily, tying the game, when the shortstop Derek Jeter, while running across the diamond, reached out, cradled the ball, and shovel passed it to catcher Jorge Posada. Posada tagged Giambi, who attempted to jump over the tag as opposed to sliding around it. ESPN ranks this play as the 45th most memorable moment of the last 25 years. [12] It would be replayed countless times over the following years, most recently as part of filmmaker Ken Burns's documentary The Tenth Inning in late September 2010. After the game, Jeter told the press that the team had been practicing this type of play all year as a result of a similarly botched throw in spring training. According to Jeter, the idea of stationing the shortstop down the first base line on balls hit to deep right field came from Yankee bench coach Don Zimmer, who was a shortstop and second baseman during his playing career; however, he stated that his initial intent was to throw the ball to third to try to get Long, and that his throw home was a reaction play. Zimmer confirmed the origin of the play's design in a conversation with Oakland's third base coach Ron Washington the next day. [13]

This single play is often credited with changing the momentum of the series as the Yankees' win forced a Game 4.

Game 4, October 14

Network Associates Coliseum in Oakland, California

Team123456789 R H E
New York0223000029111
Oakland0020000002111
WP: Orlando Hernández (1–0)   LP: Cory Lidle (0–1)

With the momentum of the dramatic Game 3 on their side, the Yankees attacked early. In the second with runners on first and second on two walks, Oakland second baseman F.P. Santangelo's error on Paul O'Neill's ground ball scored a run, then Scott Brosius's ground out scored another. Next inning, the Yankees made it 4–0 on Bernie Williams's two run double. In the bottom of the inning with runners on first and second, Terrance Long's scored a run, then after a wild pitch, Jeremy Giambi's groundout scored another. However, Orlando Hernández would allow no other runs and pitched 5 23 and Mike Stanton and Ramiro Mendoza sealed the deal out of the bullpen. In the fourth, O'Neill hit a leadoff double, moved to third on a sacrifice bunt, and scored on Alfonso Soriano's single, knocking Cory Lidle out after 3 13 innings. Erik Hiljus walked two with two outs to load the bases, then Williams hit a two-run single off Mike Magnante. In the ninth, David Justice tripled with one out off Jeff Tam and scored on Williams' double, his fifth RBI of the game. After moving to third on a groundout, he scored on Jorge Posada's single as the Yankees 9–2 win forced a Game 5 in New York.

Game 5, October 15

Yankee Stadium (I) in Bronx, New York

Team123456789 R H E
Oakland110010000373
New York02110100X5101
WP: Mike Stanton (1–0)   LP: Mark Mulder (1–1)   Sv: Mariano Rivera (2)
Home runs:
OAK: None
NYY: David Justice (1)

In Game 5, RBI singles by Jason Giambi in the first and Jeremy Giambi in the second off Roger Clemens, both coming after leadoff doubles, put Oakland up 2–0. In the bottom of the second, the Yankees loaded the bases off Mark Mulder on two singles and a hit-by-pitch before Alfonso Soriano's two-run single tied the game. Next inning, two errors by Oakland allowed the Yankees to go up 3–2. Next inning, Chuck Knoblauch hit a leadoff single, reached second on an error, moved to third on a sacrifice bunt, and scored on Derek Jeter's sacrifice fly. The A's cut the Yankees lead to 4–3 on Jason Giambi's single with two on off Mike Stanton, but the Yankees got that run back off Tim Hudson on David Justice's home run in the sixth. Roger Clemens pitched just 4 13 innings, but the bullpen pitched well as Mariano Rivera closed it out to send the Yankees to the ALCS for the fourth straight season.

For Oakland, it marked the second straight season they lost the ALDS to the Yankees in five games. The Yankees became the first MLB team to win a division series after losing the first two games at home. The San Francisco Giants would follow in 2012 and Toronto Blue Jays in 2015.

Jeter also made another spectacular play (again with Terrence Long batting) that is often overlooked. In the top of the eighth inning of Game 5, Long hit a towering foul pop up in a two-run game. Jeter, running and following the ball at the same time made a backhanded grab and then turning his body, flipped into the stands. For a moment, no one knew if the ball had been caught. Here is Thom Brennaman's call of the play on Fox television:

"1-1 to Terrence Long. Popped up, third base side, Brosius and Jeter both over. JETER...DID HE GET IT?! DID HE GET IT?! DID HE GET IT?! HE GOT IT! HE GOT IT! They throw to second; the runner tags and he's safe. Or are they saying he didn't get it? Now they're appealing; the first base umpire didn't know if Jeter caught it, had to ask the second base umpire and they said he caught it."

Jeter would continue to play in the postseason despite a slight leg injury from the tumble.

Composite box

2001 ALDS (3–2): New York Yankees over Oakland Athletics

Team123456789 R H E
New York Yankees 04342102218404
Oakland Athletics 21221012112436
Total attendance: 269,565  Average attendance: 53,913

Notes

  1. The higher seed (in parentheses) had the home field advantage (Games 1, 2 and 5 at home), which was determined by playing record. Although the team with the best record was normally intended to play the wild card team, the Mariners played the Indians, rather than the wild card Athletics, because the Mariners and Athletics are in the same division.
  2. "2001 ALDS – Cleveland Indians vs. Seattle Mariners – Game 1". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. "2001 ALDS – Cleveland Indians vs. Seattle Mariners – Game 2". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. "2001 ALDS – Seattle Mariners vs. Cleveland Indians – Game 3". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. "2001 ALDS – Seattle Mariners vs. Cleveland Indians – Game 4". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  6. "2001 ALDS – Cleveland Indians vs. Seattle Mariners – Game 5". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  7. "2001 ALDS – Oakland Athletics vs. New York Yankees – Game 1". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  8. "2001 ALDS – Oakland Athletics vs. New York Yankees – Game 2". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  9. "2001 ALDS – New York Yankees vs. Oakland Athletics – Game 3". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  10. "2001 ALDS – New York Yankees vs. Oakland Athletics – Game 4". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  11. "2001 ALDS – Oakland Athletics vs. New York Yankees – Game 5". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  12. Weinberg, Rick. "45: Jeter's backhand flip rescues Yankees" . Retrieved April 6, 2012.
  13. Madden, Bill (2003). Pride of October: What It Was to Be Young and a Yankee. New York: Warner Books. ISBN   0-446-52932-X.

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The 2007 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2007 American League playoffs, began on Wednesday, October 3 and ended on Monday, October 8. The 2007 AL Division Series consisted of three AL division champions and one wild card team, participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

2008 American League Division Series

The 2008 American League Division Series (ALDS), the first round of the 2008 American League playoffs, consisted of two best-of-five series. They were:

2009 American League Championship Series

The 2009 American League Championship Series (ALCS), the second round of the 2009 American League playoffs, was a best-of-seven game series matching the two winners of the 2009 American League Division Series. The AL East Division champions, the New York Yankees, defeated the AL West Division champions, the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, four games to two, to advance to the 2009 World Series, their first since 2003. This was the third time that these two teams faced each other in the playoffs. They met in the 2002 ALDS and 2005 ALDS with the Angels winning both series by 3–1 and 3–2. New York, with a better regular-season record than Los Angeles, held home-field advantage. The series, the 39th in league history, began on October 16 and ended on October 25. Fox Sports carried all games with Joe Buck and Tim McCarver in the broadcast booth. Starting with the 2009 season, weeknight games began 40 minutes earlier as suggested by Commissioner Bud Selig.

2017 American League Division Series

The 2017 American League Division Series were two best-of-five-games series held to determine the participating teams in the 2017 American League Championship Series. The three divisional winners and a fourth team—the winner of a one-game Wild Card playoff—played in two series.