2002 NCAA Division I-A football season

Last updated
2002 NCAA Division I-A season
Carsonpalmerheisman.jpg
Heisman Trophy won by Carson Palmer for play during the 2002 season
Number of teams117 [1]
Preseason AP No. 1 Miami (FL)
Post-season
DurationDecember 17, 2002 –
January 3, 2003
Bowl games 28
Heisman Trophy Carson Palmer (quarterback, USC)
Bowl Championship Series
2003 Fiesta Bowl
Site Sun Devil Stadium,
Tempe, Arizona
Champion(s) Ohio State
Division I-A football seasons
  2001
2003  

The 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with a double overtime national championship game. Ohio State and Miami both came into the Fiesta Bowl undefeated. The underdog Buckeyes defeated the defending-champion Hurricanes 3124, ending Miami's 34-game winning streak. Jim Tressel won the national championship in only his second year as head coach.

Contents

Rose Bowl officials were vocally upset over the loss of the Big Ten champ from the game. Former New England Patriots coach Pete Carroll returned the USC Trojans to a BCS bid in only his second season as head coach. Notre Dame also returned to prominence, as Tyrone Willingham became the first coach in Notre Dame history to win 10 games in his first season.

Beginning with the 2002 season, teams were allowed to schedule twelve regular season games instead of eleven leading to additional revenues for all teams and allowing players the enhanced opportunity to break various statistical records.

Rules changes

The NCAA Rules Committee adopted the following rules changes for the 2002 season:

Conference and program changes

No teams upgraded from Division I-AA, leaving the number of Division I-A schools fixed at 117.

School2001 Conference2002 Conference
Central Florida Knights I-A Independent MAC

Conference standings

2002 Atlantic Coast Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 21 Florida State $ 71    95 
No. 22 Virginia  62    95 
No. 13 Maryland  62    113 
No. 12 NC State  53    113 
Clemson  44    76 
Georgia Tech  44    76 
Wake Forest  35    76 
North Carolina  17    39 
Duke  08    210 
  • $ BCS representative as conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
2002 Big 12 Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
Northern Division
No. 20 Colorado xy 71    95 
No. 7 Kansas State  62    112 
Iowa State  44    77 
Nebraska  35    77 
Missouri  26    57 
Kansas  08    210 
Southern Division
No. 5 Oklahoma xy$ 62    122 
No. 6 Texas x 62    112 
Texas Tech  53    95 
Oklahoma State  53    85 
Texas A&M  35    66 
Baylor  17    39 
Championship: Oklahoma 29, Colorado 7
  • $ BCS representative as conference champion
  • x Division champion/co-champions
  • y Championship game participant
Rankings from AP Poll
2002 Big East Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 2 Miami (FL) $ 70    121 
No. 25 West Virginia  61    94 
No. 19 Pittsburgh  52    94 
No. 18 Virginia Tech  34    104 
Boston College  34    94 
Temple  25    48 
Syracuse  25    48 
Rutgers  07    111 
  • $ BCS representative as conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
2002 Big Ten Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 1 Ohio State $#+ 80    140 
No. 8 Iowa  %+ 80    112 
No. 9 Michigan  62    103 
No. 16 Penn State  53    94 
Purdue  44    76 
Illinois  44    57 
Minnesota  35    85 
Wisconsin  26    86 
Michigan State  26    48 
Northwestern  17    39 
Indiana  17    39 
  • # BCS National Champion
  • $ BCS representative as conference champion
  • % BCS at-large representative
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll [2]
2002 Conference USA football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 23 TCU + 62    102 
Cincinnati + 62    77 
Louisville  53    76 
Southern Miss  53    76 
Tulane  44    85 
UAB  44    57 
East Carolina  44    48 
Houston  35    57 
Memphis  26    39 
Army  17    111 
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2002 Mid-American Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
East Division
No. 24 Marshall x$ 71    112 
UCF  62    75 
Miami  53    75 
Ohio  44    48 
Akron  35    48 
Kent State  17    39 
Buffalo  08    111 
West Division
Toledo xy 71    95 
Northern Illinois x 71    84 
Bowling Green  62    93 
Ball State  44    66 
Western Michigan  35    48 
Central Michigan  26    48 
Eastern Michigan  17    39 
Championship: Marshall 49, Toledo 45
  • $ Conference champion
  • x Division champion/co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2002 Mountain West Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
Colorado State $ 61    104 
New Mexico  52    77 
Air Force  43    85 
San Diego State  43    49 
Utah  34    56 
UNLV  34    57 
BYU  25    57 
Wyoming  16    210 
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
2002 Pacific-10 Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 10 Washington State $+ 71    103 
No. 4 USC  %+ 71    112 
Arizona State  53    86 
UCLA  44    85 
Oregon State  44    85 
California  44    75 
Washington  44    76 
Oregon  35    76 
Arizona  17    48 
Stanford  17    29 
  • $ BCS representative as conference champion
  • % BCS at-large representative
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2002 Southeastern Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
Eastern Division
No. 3 Georgia x$ 71    131 
Florida  62    85 
Tennessee  53    85 
Kentucky  35    75 
South Carolina  35    57 
Vanderbilt  08    210 
Western Division
No. 11 Alabama  62    103 
Arkansas xy 53    95 
No. 14 Auburn x 53    94 
LSU x 53    85 
Ole Miss  35    76 
Mississippi State  08    39 
Championship: Georgia 30, Arkansas 3
  • $ BCS representative as conference champion
  • x Division champion/co-champions
  • y Championship game participant
  • Alabama had the best division record, but did not participate in postseason play due to NCAA probation.
Rankings from AP Poll
2002 Sun Belt Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
North Texas $ 60    85 
New Mexico State  51    75 
Arkansas State  33    67 
Middle Tennessee  24    48 
Louisiana–Lafayette  24    39 
Louisiana–Monroe  24    39 
Idaho  15    210 
  • $ Conference champion
2002 Western Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 15 Boise State $ 80    121 
Hawaii  71    104 
Fresno State  62    95 
San Jose State  44    67 
Nevada  44    57 
Rice  35    47 
Louisiana Tech  35    48 
SMU  35    39 
UTEP  17    210 
Tulsa  17    111 
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
2002 NCAA Division I-A independents football records
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
South Florida      92 
No. 17 Notre Dame      103 
Connecticut      66 
Utah State      47 
Troy State      48 
Navy      210 
Rankings from AP Poll

Bowl Championship Series rankings

WEEKNo. 1No. 2EVENT
OCT 21 Oklahoma Miami
OCT 28OklahomaMiami Ohio State 34, Minnesota 3
NOV 4OklahomaOhio State Texas A&M 30, Oklahoma 26
NOV 11Ohio StateMiamiOhio State 23, Illinois 16
NOV 18MiamiOhio StateMiami 28, Pittsburgh 21
NOV 25MiamiOhio StateMiami 49, Syracuse 7
DEC 2MiamiOhio StateMiami 56, Virginia Tech 45
FINALMiamiOhio State

Final BCS rankings

BCSSchoolRecordBCS Bowl game
1 Miami (FL) 12–0 Fiesta
2 Ohio State 13–0Fiesta
3 Georgia 12–1 Sugar
4 USC 10–2 Orange
5 Iowa 11–1Orange
6 Washington State 10–2 Rose
7 Oklahoma 11–2Rose
8 Kansas State 10–2
9 Notre Dame 10–2
10 Texas 10–2
11 Michigan 9–3
12 Penn State 9–3
13 Colorado 9–4
14 Florida State 9–4Sugar
15 West Virginia 9–4

Bowl games

The Rose Bowl normally features the champions of the Big Ten and the Pac-10. However, Big Ten-champion Ohio State, finishing No. 2 in the BCS, had qualified to play in the 2003 Fiesta Bowl for the national championship against Miami (Florida) [3] Earlier in the season, Ohio State had defeated Washington State 25–7.

After the national championship was set, the Orange Bowl had the next pick, and invited No. 3 (No. 5 BCS) Iowa from the Big Ten. When it was the Rose Bowl's turn to select, the best available team was No. 8 (No. 7 BCS) Oklahoma, who won the Big 12 Championship Game. When it came time for the Orange Bowl and Sugar Bowl to make a second pick, both wanted Pac-10 co-champion USC. However, a BCS rule stated that if two bowls wanted the same team, the bowl with the higher payoff had priority. [4] The Orange Bowl immediately extended an at-large bid to the No. 5 Trojans and paired them with at-large No. 3 Iowa in a Big Ten/Pac-10 "Rose Bowl East" matchup in the 2003 Orange Bowl. The Rose Bowl was left to pair Oklahoma with Pac-10 co-champion Washington State. [4] Rose Bowl committee executive director Mitch Dorger was not pleased with the results. [4]

As such, the BCS instituted a new rule, whereby a bowl losing its conference champion to the BCS championship could "protect" the second-place team from that conference from going to another bowl. This left the Sugar Bowl with No. 14 BCS Florida State, the winner of the Atlantic Coast Conference. Notre Dame at 10–2 and No. 9 in the BCS standings was invited to the 2003 Gator Bowl. Kansas State at No. 8 also was left out.

BCS bowls

Other New Year's Day bowls

December Bowl Games

Heisman Trophy voting

The Heisman Memorial Trophy Award is given to the

Most Outstanding Player of the year
Winner: Carson Palmer (Sr.), QB, USC (1,328 points)

Other major awards

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References

  1. http://www.jhowell.net/cf/cf2002.htm
  2. "2002 NCAA Football Rankings - AP Top 25 Postseason (Jan. 5)". ESPN. Retrieved November 29, 2010.
  3. 2002 BCS Standings
  4. 1 2 3 Rosenblatt, Richard – BCS: Orange Bowl has a Rosy look Associated Press, December 9, 2002