2003–04 UEFA Champions League

Last updated
2003–04 UEFA Champions League
Germany -v- Ireland Euro 2016 Qualifier (15365957457).jpg
The final was played at Arena AufSchalke in Gelsenkirchen.
Tournament details
Dates11 July 2003 – 26 May 2004
Teams32 (group stage)
72 (total)
Final positions
Champions Flag of Portugal.svg Porto (2nd title)
Runners-up Flag of France.svg Monaco
Tournament statistics
Matches played125
Goals scored309 (2.47 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Spain.svg Fernando Morientes
(9 goals)

The 2003–04 UEFA Champions League was the 12th season of UEFA's premier European club football tournament, the UEFA Champions League, since its rebranding from the European Cup in 1992, and the 49th tournament overall. The competition was won by Portugal's Porto, who defeated AS Monaco of France 3–0 at the Arena AufSchalke in Gelsenkirchen, Germany for Portugal's first win since 1987. This was Porto's second European trophy in two years, following their UEFA Cup success from the previous season. This was the first UEFA Champions League competition to feature a 16-team knockout round instead of a second group stage.

Contents

After eliminating (in order) Manchester United, Lyon and Deportivo La Coruña, Porto met AS Monaco in the final. Monaco had previously knocked out Lokomotiv Moscow, Real Madrid and Chelsea.

Milan were the defending champions, but were eliminated by Deportivo La Coruña in the quarter-finals.

Qualification

A total of 72 teams from 48 UEFA member associations participated in the 2003–04 UEFA Champions League. Liechtenstein (who don't have their own domestic league) as well as Andorra and San Marino are not participating. Also wasn't admitted Azerbaijan, which was suspended by UEFA. Each association enters a certain number of clubs to the Champions League based on its league coefficient; associations with a higher league coefficients may enter more clubs than associations with a lower league coefficient, but no association may enter more than four teams.

Association ranking

For the 2003–04 UEFA Champions League, the associations are allocated places according to their 2002 UEFA country coefficients, which takes into account their performance in European competitions from 1997–98 to 2001–02. [1]

RankAssociationCoeff.Teams
1 Flag of Spain.svg Spain 68.4674
2 Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Italy 58.668
3 Flag of England.svg England 55.459
4 Flag of Germany.svg Germany 52.9903
5 Flag of France.svg France 42.352
6 Flag of Greece.svg Greece 36.116
7 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands 34.1652
8 Flag of Turkey.svg Turkey 28.725
9 Flag of Portugal.svg Portugal 28.249
10 Flag of Russia.svg Russia 27.291
11 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czech Republic 26.625
12 Flag of Scotland.svg Scotland 26.125
13 Flag of Ukraine.svg Ukraine 25.958
14 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Belgium 25.525
15 Flag of Austria.svg Austria 23.250
16 Flag of Switzerland.svg Switzerland 22.6251
17 Flag of Norway.svg Norway 21.475
18 Flag of Israel.svg Israel 21.332
RankAssociationCoeff.Teams
19 Flag of Croatia.svg Croatia 21.0411
20 Flag of Poland.svg Poland 17.500
21 Flag of Denmark.svg Denmark 17.375
22 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 17.241
23 Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg Serbia and Montenegro 16.331
24 Flag of Slovakia.svg Slovakia 15.665
25 Flag of Bulgaria.svg Bulgaria 15.165
26 Flag of Romania.svg Romania 13.916
27 Flag of Hungary.svg Hungary 13.749
28 Flag of Slovenia.svg Slovenia 11.832
29 Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg Cyprus 9.332
30 Flag of Finland.svg Finland 8.041
31 Flag of Latvia.svg Latvia 7.165
32 Flag of Georgia (1990-2004).svg Georgia 6.999
33 Flag of Moldova.svg Moldova 5.165
34 Flag of Iceland.svg Iceland 4.832
35 Flag of Belarus (1995-2012).svg Belarus 4.083
RankAssociationCoeff.Teams
36 Flag of Lithuania (1988-2004).svg Lithuania 3.8311
37 Flag of Ireland.svg Republic of Ireland 3.331
38 Flag of North Macedonia.svg Macedonia 2.997
39 Flag of Malta.svg Malta 2.498
40 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Wales 1.832
41 Flag of Estonia.svg Estonia 1.665
42 Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Bosnia and Herzegovina 1.333
43 Flag of Armenia.svg Armenia 1.332
44 Ulster Banner.svg Northern Ireland 1.331
45 Flag of Albania.svg Albania 1.165
46 Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg Faroe Islands 1.165
47 Flag of Azerbaijan.svg Azerbaijan 1.1650
48 Flag of Liechtenstein.svg Liechtenstein 1.000
49 Flag of Luxembourg.svg Luxembourg 0.8321
50 Flag of Andorra.svg Andorra 0.0000
51 Flag of San Marino (1862-2011).svg San Marino 0.000
52 Flag of Kazakhstan.svg Kazakhstan 0.0001

Distribution

Since the title holders (Milan) also qualified for the Champions League Third qualifying round through their domestic league, one Third qualifying round spot was vacated. Due to this, as well as due to suspension of Azerbaijan, the following changes to the default access list are made:

Teams entering in this roundTeams advancing from previous round
First qualifying round
(20 teams)
  • 20 champions from associations 29–52
    (except Azerbaijan, Liechtenstein, Andorra and San Marino)
Second qualifying round
(28 teams)
  • 12 champions from associations 17–28
  • 6 runners-up from associations 10–15
  • 10 winners from the first qualifying round
Third qualifying round
(32 teams)
  • 7 champions from associations 10–16
  • 3 runners-up from associations 7–9
  • 5 third-place finishers from associations 1–6 (except Italy)
  • 3 fourth-place finishers from associations 1–3
  • 14 winners from the second qualifying round
Group stage
(32 teams)
  • 1 current Champions League title holder (Milan)
  • 9 champions from associations 1–9
  • 6 runners-up from associations 1–6
  • 16 winners from the third qualifying round
Knockout phase
(16 teams)
  • 8 group winners from the group stage
  • 8 group runners-up from the group stage

Teams

League positions of the previous season shown in parentheses (TH: Champions League title holders).

Group stage
Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid (1st) Flag of England.svg Manchester United (1st) Flag of France.svg Lyon (1st) Flag of the Netherlands.svg PSV Eindhoven (1st)
Flag of Spain.svg Real Sociedad (2nd) Flag of England.svg Arsenal (2nd) Flag of France.svg Monaco (2nd) Flag of Turkey.svg Beşiktaş (1st)
Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Juventus (1st) Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich (1st) Flag of Greece.svg Olympiacos (1st) Flag of Portugal.svg Porto (1st)
Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Internazionale (2nd) Flag of Germany.svg VfB Stuttgart (2nd) Flag of Greece.svg Panathinaikos (2nd) Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Milan (3rd) TH
Third qualifying round
Flag of Spain.svg Deportivo La Coruña (3rd) Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Dortmund (3rd) Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica (2nd) Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv (1st)
Flag of Spain.svg Celta de Vigo (4th) Flag of France.svg Marseille (3rd) Flag of Russia.svg Lokomotiv Moscow (1st) Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Club Brugge (1st)
Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Lazio (4th) Flag of Greece.svg AEK Athens (3rd) Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague (1st) Flag of Austria.svg Austria Wien (1st)
Flag of England.svg Newcastle United (3rd) Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ajax (2nd) Flag of Scotland.svg Rangers (1st) Flag of Switzerland.svg Grasshopper (1st)
Flag of England.svg Chelsea (4th) Flag of Turkey.svg Galatasaray (2nd)
Second qualifying round
Flag of Russia.svg CSKA Moscow (2nd) Flag of Austria.svg GAK (2nd) Flag of Denmark.svg Copenhagen (1st) Flag of Bulgaria.svg CSKA Sofia (1st)
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague (2nd) Flag of Norway.svg Rosenborg (1st) Flag of Sweden.svg Djurgården (1st) Flag of Romania.svg Rapid București (1st)
Flag of Scotland.svg Celtic (2nd) Flag of Israel.svg Maccabi Tel Aviv (1st) Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg Partizan (1st) Flag of Hungary.svg MTK Budapest (1st)
Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk (2nd) Flag of Croatia.svg Dinamo Zagreb (1st) Flag of Slovakia.svg Žilina (1st) Flag of Slovenia.svg Maribor (1st)
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Anderlecht (2nd) Flag of Poland.svg Wisła Kraków (1st)
First qualifying round
Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg Omonia (1st) Flag of Iceland.svg KR (1st) Flag of Malta.svg Sliema Wanderers (1st) Ulster Banner.svg Glentoran (1st)
Flag of Finland.svg HJK (1st) Flag of Belarus (1995-2012).svg BATE Borisov (1st) Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Barry Town (1st) Flag of Albania.svg Tirana (1st)
Flag of Latvia.svg Skonto (1st) Flag of Lithuania (1988-2004).svg FBK Kaunas (1st) Flag of Estonia.svg Flora Tallinn (1st) Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg HB (1st)
Flag of Georgia (1990-2004).svg Dinamo Tbilisi (1st) Flag of Ireland.svg Bohemian (1st) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Leotar (1st) Flag of Luxembourg.svg Grevenmacher (1st)
Flag of Moldova.svg Sheriff Tiraspol (1st) Flag of North Macedonia.svg Vardar (1st) Flag of Armenia.svg Pyunik (1st) Flag of Kazakhstan.svg Irtysh Pavlodar (1st)
Notes
  1. ^ Azerbaijan (AZE): Clubs from Azerbaijan were not admitted to UEFA competitions as no domestic league took place in 2002–03 season and AFFA was suspended by UEFA as a result of ongoing conflict between the clubs and federation. [2]

Round and draw dates

The schedule of the competition is as follows (all draws are held at UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland, unless stated otherwise). [3]

PhaseRoundDraw dateFirst legSecond leg
QualifyingFirst qualifying round20 June 200316 July 200323 July 2003
Second qualifying round30 July 20036 August 2003
Third qualifying round25 July 200312–13 August 200326–27 August 2003
Group stageMatchday 128 August 2003
(Monaco)
16–17 September 2003
Matchday 230 September – 1 October 2003
Matchday 321–22 October 2003
Matchday 44–5 November 2003
Matchday 525–26 November 2003
Matchday 69–10 December 2003
Knockout phaseRound of 1612 December 200324–25 February 20049–10 March 2004
Quarter-finals12 March 200423–24 March 20046–7 April 2004
Semi-finals20–21 April 20044–5 May 2004
Final26 May 2004 at Arena AufSchalke, Gelsenkirchen

Qualifying rounds

First qualifying round

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Pyunik Flag of Armenia.svg 2–1 Flag of Iceland.svg KR 1–01–1
Sheriff Tiraspol Flag of Moldova.svg 2–1 Flag of Estonia.svg Flora Tallinn 1–01–1
HB Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg 1–5 Flag of Lithuania (1988-2004).svg FBK Kaunas 0–11–4
BATE Borisov Flag of Belarus (1995-2012).svg 1–3 Flag of Ireland.svg Bohemians 1–00–3
Vardar Flag of North Macedonia.svg 4–2 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Barry Town 3–01–2
Grevenmacher Flag of Luxembourg.svg 0–2 Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Leotar 0–00–2
Glentoran Ulster Banner.svg 0–1 Flag of Finland.svg HJK 0–00–1
Sliema Wanderers Flag of Malta.svg 3–3 (a) Flag of Latvia.svg Skonto 2–01–3
Omonia Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg 2–1 Flag of Kazakhstan.svg Irtysh Pavlodar 0–02–1
Dinamo Tbilisi Flag of Georgia (1990-2004).svg 3–3 (2–4 p) Flag of Albania.svg KF Tirana 3–00–3 (aet)

Second qualifying round

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
MTK Flag of Hungary.svg 3–2 Flag of Finland.svg HJK 3–10–1
Pyunik Flag of Armenia.svg 0–3 Flag of Bulgaria.svg CSKA Sofia 0–20–1
FBK Kaunas Flag of Lithuania (1988-2004).svg 0–5 Flag of Scotland.svg Celtic 0–40–1
Leotar Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg 1–4 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague 1–20–2
Sheriff Tiraspol Flag of Moldova.svg 0–2 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk 0–00–2
Žilina Flag of Slovakia.svg 2–1 Flag of Israel.svg Maccabi Tel Aviv 1–01–1
Bohemians Flag of Ireland.svg 0–5 Flag of Norway.svg Rosenborg 0–10–4
Maribor Flag of Slovenia.svg 2–3 Flag of Croatia.svg Dinamo Zagreb 1–11–2
CSKA Moscow Flag of Russia.svg 2–3 Flag of North Macedonia.svg Vardar 1–21–1
Rapid Bucureşti Flag of Romania.svg 2–3 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Anderlecht 0–02–3
Partizan Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg 3–3 (a) Flag of Sweden.svg Djurgården 1–12–2
Wisła Kraków Flag of Poland.svg 7–4 Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg Omonia 5–22–2
Copenhagen Flag of Denmark.svg 10–1 Flag of Malta.svg Sliema Wanderers 4–16–0
KF Tirana Flag of Albania.svg 2–7 Flag of Austria.svg GAK 1–51–2

Third qualifying round

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Vardar Flag of North Macedonia.svg 4–5 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague 2–32–2
MTK Flag of Hungary.svg 0–5 Flag of Scotland.svg Celtic 0–40–1
Rangers Flag of Scotland.svg 3–2 Flag of Denmark.svg Copenhagen 1–12–1
Austria Wien Flag of Austria.svg 0–1 Flag of France.svg Marseille 0–10–0
Club Brugge Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 3–3 (4–2 p) Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Dortmund 2–11–2 (aet)
Shakhtar Donetsk Flag of Ukraine.svg 2–3 Flag of Russia.svg Lokomotiv Moscow 1–01–3
Lazio Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg 4–1 Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica 3–11–0
Dynamo Kyiv Flag of Ukraine.svg 5–1 Flag of Croatia.svg Dinamo Zagreb 3–12–0
Rosenborg Flag of Norway.svg 0–1 Flag of Spain.svg Deportivo La Coruña 0–00–1
Grasshopper Flag of Switzerland.svg 2–3 Flag of Greece.svg AEK Athens 1–01–3
MŠK Žilina Flag of Slovakia.svg 0–5 Flag of England.svg Chelsea 0–20–3
Celta Vigo Flag of Spain.svg 3–2 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague 3–00–2
Partizan Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg 1–1 (4–3 p) Flag of England.svg Newcastle United 0–11–0 (aet)
Galatasaray Flag of Turkey.svg 6–0 Flag of Bulgaria.svg CSKA Sofia 3–03–0
Anderlecht Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 4–1 Flag of Poland.svg Wisła Kraków 3–11–0
GAK Flag of Austria.svg 2–3 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ajax 1–11–2 (aet)

Group stage

Europe blank laea location map.svg
Brown pog.svg
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Red pog.svg
Green pog.svg
Blue pog.svg
Pink pog.svg
Yellow pog.svg
Orange pog.svg
Blue pog.svg
Orange pog.svg
Brown pog.svg
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Green pog.svg
Yellow pog.svg
Green pog.svg
Orange pog.svg
AEK
Purple pog.svg
Yellow pog.svg
Pink pog.svg
Red pog.svg
Orange pog.svg
PSV
Pink pog.svg
Blue pog.svg
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Brown pog.svg
Orange pog.svg
Blue pog.svg
Purple pog.svg
Yellow pog.svg
Red pog.svg
Location of teams of the 2003–04 UEFA Champions League group stage.
Brown pog.svg Brown: Group A; Red pog.svg Red: Group B; Orange pog.svg Orange: Group C; Yellow pog.svg Yellow: Group D;
Green pog.svg Green: Group E; Blue pog.svg Blue: Group F; Purple pog.svg Purple: Group G; Pink pog.svg Pink: Group H.

Title holders, 16 winners from the third qualifying round, 9 champions from countries ranked 1–10, and six second-placed teams from countries ranked 1–6 were drawn into eight groups of four teams each. The top two teams in each group advanced to the Champions League play-offs, while the third-placed teams advanced to the Third Round of the UEFA Cup.

Tiebreakers, if necessary, were applied in the following order:

  1. Points earned in head-to-head matches between the tied teams.
  2. Total goals scored in head-to-head matches between the tied teams.
  3. Away goals scored in head-to-head matches between the tied teams.
  4. Cumulative goal difference in all group matches.
  5. Total goals scored in all group matches.
  6. Higher UEFA coefficient going into the competition.

Real Sociedad, Celta Vigo, Stuttgart and Partizan made their debut appearance in the group stage.

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification OL BAY CEL AND
1 Flag of France.svg Lyon 631277010Advance to knockout stage 1–1 3–2 1–0
2 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 623165+19 1–2 2–1 1–0
3 Flag of Scotland.svg Celtic 621387+17Transfer to UEFA Cup 2–0 0–0 3–1
4 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Anderlecht 62134627 1–0 1–1 1–0
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification ARS LM INT DK
1 Flag of England.svg Arsenal 631296+310Advance to knockout stage 2–0 0–3 1–0
2 Flag of Russia.svg Lokomotiv Moscow 62227708 0–0 3–0 3–2
3 Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Internazionale 622281138Transfer to UEFA Cup 1–5 1–1 2–1
4 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv 62138807 2–1 2–0 1–1
Source:

Group C

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification MON DEP PSV AEK
1 Flag of France.svg Monaco 6321156+911Advance to knockout stage 8–3 1–1 4–0
2 Flag of Spain.svg Deportivo La Coruña 63121212010 1–0 2–0 3–0
3 Flag of the Netherlands.svg PSV Eindhoven 631287+110Transfer to UEFA Cup 1–2 3–2 2–0
4 Flag of Greece.svg AEK Athens 6024111102 0–0 1–1 0–1

Group D

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification JUV RSO GAL OLY
1 Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Juventus 6411156+913Advance to knockout stage 4–2 2–1 7–0
2 Flag of Spain.svg Real Sociedad 62318809 0–0 1–1 1–0
3 Flag of Turkey.svg Galatasaray 62136827Transfer to UEFA Cup 2–0 1–2 1–0
4 Flag of Greece.svg Olympiacos 611461374 1–2 2–2 3–0
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group E

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification MU STU PAN RAN
1 Flag of England.svg Manchester United 6501132+1115Advance to knockout stage 2–0 5–0 3–0
2 Flag of Germany.svg Stuttgart 640296+312 2–1 2–0 1–0
3 Flag of Greece.svg Panathinaikos 611451384Transfer to UEFA Cup 0–1 1–3 1–1
4 Flag of Scotland.svg Rangers 611441064 0–1 2–1 1–3
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group F

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification RM POR OM PAR
1 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid 6420115+614Advance to knockout stage 1–1 4–2 1–0
2 Flag of Portugal.svg Porto 632198+111 1–3 1–0 2–1
3 Flag of France.svg Marseille 611491124Transfer to UEFA Cup 1–2 2–3 3–0
4 Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg Partizan 60333853 0–0 1–1 1–1
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group G

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification CHE SP BJK LAZ
1 Flag of England.svg Chelsea 641193+613Advance to knockout stage 0–0 0–2 2–1
2 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague 62225508 0–1 2–1 1–0
3 Flag of Turkey.svg Beşiktaş 62135727Transfer to UEFA Cup 0–2 1–0 0–2
4 Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Lazio 612361045 0–4 2–2 1–1
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group H

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification MIL CEL BRU AJA
1 Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Milan 631243+110Advance to knockout stage 1–2 0–1 1–0
2 Flag of Spain.svg Celta Vigo 623176+19 0–0 1–1 3–2
3 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Club Brugge 62225618Transfer to UEFA Cup 0–1 1–1 2–1
4 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ajax 62046716 0–1 1–0 2–0
Source: [ citation needed ]

Knockout stage

Bracket

 First knockout roundQuarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
                     
  Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 101 
  Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid 112 
   Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid 415 
   Flag of France.svg Monaco (a)235 
  Flag of Russia.svg Lokomotiv Moscow 202
  Flag of France.svg Monaco (a)112 
   Flag of France.svg Monaco 325 
   Flag of England.svg Chelsea 123 
  Flag of Germany.svg Stuttgart 000 
  Flag of England.svg Chelsea 101 
   Flag of England.svg Chelsea 123
   Flag of England.svg Arsenal 112 
  Flag of Spain.svg Celta Vigo 202
  Flag of England.svg Arsenal 325 
   Flag of France.svg Monaco 0
   Flag of Portugal.svg Porto 3
  Flag of Portugal.svg Porto 213 
  Flag of England.svg Manchester United 112 
   Flag of Portugal.svg Porto 224
   Flag of France.svg Lyon 022 
  Flag of Spain.svg Real Sociedad 000
  Flag of France.svg Lyon 112 
   Flag of Portugal.svg Porto 011
   Flag of Spain.svg Deportivo La Coruña 000 
  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague 011 
  Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Milan 044 
   Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Milan 404
   Flag of Spain.svg Deportivo La Coruña 145 
  Flag of Spain.svg Deportivo La Coruña 112
  Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Juventus 000 

Round of 16

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Bayern Munich Flag of Germany.svg 1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid 1–1 0–1
Celta Vigo Flag of Spain.svg 2–5 Flag of England.svg Arsenal 2–3 0–2
Deportivo La Coruña Flag of Spain.svg 2–0 Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Juventus 1–0 1–0
Lokomotiv Moscow Flag of Russia.svg 2–2 (a) Flag of France.svg Monaco 2–1 0–1
Porto Flag of Portugal.svg 3–2 Flag of England.svg Manchester United 2–1 1–1
Real Sociedad Flag of Spain.svg 0–2 Flag of France.svg Lyon 0–1 0–1
Sparta Prague Flag of the Czech Republic.svg 1–4 Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Milan 0–0 1–4
VfB Stuttgart Flag of Germany.svg 0–1 Flag of England.svg Chelsea 0–1 0–0

Quarter-finals

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Chelsea Flag of England.svg 3–2 Flag of England.svg Arsenal 1–1 2–1
Milan Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg 4–5 Flag of Spain.svg Deportivo La Coruña 4–1 0–4
Porto Flag of Portugal.svg 4–2 Flag of France.svg Lyon 2–0 2–2
Real Madrid Flag of Spain.svg 5–5 (a) Flag of France.svg Monaco 4–2 1–3

Semi-finals

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Monaco Flag of France.svg 5–3 Flag of England.svg Chelsea 3–1 2–2
Porto Flag of Portugal.svg 1–0 Flag of Spain.svg Deportivo La Coruña 0–0 1–0

Final

As winners of the competition, Porto went on to represent Europe at the 2004 Intercontinental Cup.

Monaco Flag of France.svg 0–3 Flag of Portugal.svg Porto
Report Carlos Alberto Soccerball shade.svg 39'
Deco Soccerball shade.svg 71'
Alenichev Soccerball shade.svg 75'

Statistics

Statistics exclude qualifying rounds.

See also

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The 2006–07 UEFA Champions League was the 15th season of UEFA's premier European club football tournament, the UEFA Champions League, since it was rebranded from the European Cup, and the 52nd season overall. The final was contested by Milan and Liverpool on 23 May 2007. Beforehand, the match was billed as a repeat of the 2005 final, the only difference being that the 2007 final was to be played at the Olympic Stadium in Athens, Greece. Milan won the match 2–1 to claim their seventh European Cup, with both goals coming from Filippo Inzaghi. Dirk Kuyt scored for Liverpool.

2007–08 UEFA Champions League sports season

The 2007–08 UEFA Champions League was the 16th season of UEFA's premier European club football tournament, the UEFA Champions League, since it was rebranded in 1992, and the 53rd tournament overall.

2008–09 UEFA Champions League football tournament

The 2008–09 UEFA Champions League was the 54th edition of Europe's premier club football tournament and the 17th edition under the current UEFA Champions League format. The final was played at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome on 27 May 2009. It was the eighth time the European Cup final has been held in Italy and the fourth time it has been held at the Stadio Olimpico. The final was contested by the defending champions, Manchester United, and Barcelona, who had last won the tournament in 2006. Barcelona won the match 2–0, with goals from Samuel Eto'o and Lionel Messi, securing The Treble in the process. In addition, both UEFA Cup finalists, Werder Bremen and Shakhtar Donetsk featured in the Champions League group stage.

2009–10 UEFA Champions League football tournament

The 2009–10 UEFA Champions League was the 55th season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 18th under the current UEFA Champions League format. The final was played on 22 May 2010, at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium, home of Real Madrid, in Madrid, Spain. The final was won by Italian club Inter Milan, who beat German side Bayern Munich 2–0. Internazionale went on to represent Europe in the 2010 FIFA Club World Cup, beating Congolese side TP Mazembe 3–0 in the final, and played in the 2010 UEFA Super Cup against Europa League winners Atlético Madrid, losing 2–0.

2010–11 UEFA Champions League football tournament

The 2010–11 UEFA Champions League was the 56th season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 19th under the current UEFA Champions League format. The final was held at Wembley Stadium in London on 28 May 2011, where Barcelona defeated Manchester United 3–1. Internazionale were the defending champions, but were eliminated by Schalke 04 in the quarter-finals. As winners, Barcelona earned berths in the 2011 UEFA Super Cup and the 2011 FIFA Club World Cup.

2010–11 UEFA Europa League football tournament

The 2010–11 UEFA Europa League was the second season of the UEFA Europa League, Europe's secondary club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 40th edition overall including its predecessor, the UEFA Cup. It began on 1 July 2010, with the first qualifying round matches, and concluded on 18 May 2011, with the final at the Aviva Stadium in Dublin, Republic of Ireland, between Porto and first-time finalists Braga. This was the first all-Portuguese final of a European competition and only the third time that two Portuguese teams faced each other in Europe, following Braga's elimination of Benfica in the semi-finals. Porto defeated Braga 1–0, with a goal from the competition's top goalscorer Radamel Falcao, and won their second title in the competition, after victory in the 2002–03 UEFA Cup. Atletico Madrid were the defending champions but were eliminated in group stage.

2011–12 UEFA Europa League football tournament

The 2011–12 UEFA Europa League was the third season of the UEFA Europa League, Europe's secondary club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 41st edition overall including its predecessor, the UEFA Cup. It began on 30 June 2011 with the first legs of the first qualifying round, and ended on 9 May 2012 with the final held at Arena Națională in Bucharest, Romania. As part of a trial that started in the 2009–10 UEFA Europa League, two extra officials – one on each goal line – were used in all matches of the competition from the group stage.

2011–12 UEFA Champions League football tournament

The 2011–12 UEFA Champions League was the 57th season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 20th season in its current Champions League format. As part of a trial that started in the 2009–10 UEFA Europa League, two extra officials – one behind each goal – were used in all matches of the competition from the play-off round.

2012–13 UEFA Champions League football tournament

The 2012–13 UEFA Champions League was the 58th season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 21st season since it was renamed from the European Champion Clubs' Cup to the UEFA Champions League.

2014–15 UEFA Champions League football tournament that concluded in 2015

The 2014–15 UEFA Champions League was the 60th season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 23rd season since it was renamed from the European Champion Clubs' Cup to the UEFA Champions League.

2016–17 UEFA Champions League

The 2016–17 UEFA Champions League was the 62nd season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 25th season since it was renamed from the European Champion Clubs' Cup to the UEFA Champions League.

2017–18 UEFA Champions League

The 2017–18 UEFA Champions League was the 63rd season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, the 26th season since it was renamed from the European Champion Clubs' Cup to the UEFA Champions League.

References

  1. "UEFA Country Ranking 2002". Bert Kassies.
  2. Azerbaijan 2002/03 at RSSSF
  3. "UEFA European Football Calendar 2003/2004". Bert Kassies.
  4. "Statistics — Tournament phase — Assists". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 16 April 2016.