2003 FIFA Women's World Cup Final

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2003 FIFA Women's World Cup Final
FIFA Women's World Cup 2003 - Germany vs Sweden.jpg
Sideline view of the match
Event 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup
After extra time
Date12 October 2003 (2003-10-12)
Venue Home Depot Center, Carson
Referee Cristina Babadac (Romania)
Attendance26,137
1999
2007

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup Final was an association football match which determined the winner of the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, contested by the women's national teams of the member associations of FIFA. It was played on 12 October 2003 and won by Germany, who defeated Sweden 2–1 in extra time.

Association football Team field sport played between two teams of eleven players with spherical ball

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

2003 FIFA Womens World Cup 2003 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fourth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in the United States and won by Germany. They won their first women's world title and became the first country to win both men's and women's World Cup.

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is a non-profit organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and efootball.

Contents

The tournament was hosted on short notice by the United States, following the withdrawal of China due to an outbreak of SARS, and the final was hosted at the Home Depot Center, a small soccer-specific stadium in Carson, California, near Los Angeles. Both finalists had finished at the top of their groups in European qualification and met at the final of the 2001 UEFA Women's Championship, which Germany won.

Soccer-specific stadium Type of sports stadium

Soccer-specific stadium is a term used mainly in the United States and Canada to refer to a sports stadium either purpose-built or fundamentally redesigned for soccer and whose primary function is to host soccer matches, as opposed to a multipurpose stadium which is for a variety of sports. A soccer-specific stadium may host other sporting events and concerts, but the design and purpose of a soccer-specific stadium is primarily for soccer. Some facilities have a permanent stage at one end of the stadium used for staging concerts.

Carson, California City in California, United States

Carson is a city in Los Angeles County, California, located 13 miles (21 km) south of downtown Los Angeles and approximately 14 miles away from the Los Angeles International Airport. Incorporated on February 20, 1968, Carson is the newest municipality in the South Bay region of Metropolitan Los Angeles. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 91,714.

Los Angeles City in California

Los Angeles, officially the City of Los Angeles and often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in California, the second most populous city in the United States, after New York City, and the third most populous city in North America. With an estimated population of nearly four million, Los Angeles is the cultural, financial, and commercial center of Southern California. The city is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic diversity, Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its sprawling metropolis. Los Angeles is the largest city on the West Coast of North America.

Sweden went into half-time with a 1–0 lead, but conceded an equalizing goal to Germany early in the second half. The match went to extra time and was decided by a golden goal scored by Nia Künzer in the 98th minute. [1] [2] [3]

The golden goal or golden point is a rule used in association football, bandy, lacrosse, field hockey, ice hockey, floorball and korfball to decide the winner of a match in which scores are equal at the end of normal time. It is a type of sudden death. Under this rule, the game will end when a goal or point is scored; the team that scores that goal or point during extra time will be the winner. Introduced formally in 1992, though with some history before that, the rule ceased to apply to most FIFA-authorized football games in 2004. The similar silver goal supplemented the golden goal between 2002 and 2004.

Nia Künzer Association footballer

Nia Künzer is a retired German women's football player.

Background

The 2003 final marked the twelfth meeting between Germany and Sweden in international women's football and the third time in a FIFA Women's World Cup match. [4] The two teams met in the 1995 and 2001 finals of the UEFA Women's Championship, which were both won by Germany. [5] Germany had won six of their previous matches against Sweden and lost the remaining five, including a 2–1 loss in the 2002 Algarve Cup. [6] Germany had previously finished as runners-up in the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, while Sweden finished third in 1991 by defeating the Germans in the consolation match. [7]

The 1995 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1995 was a football tournament that happened between 1993 and 1995. The final game was held in Germany. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

The 2001 UEFA Women's Championship was the eighth UEFA Women's Championship, a competition for the women's national football teams and member associations of UEFA. It took place in Germany between 23 June and 7 July 2001. It was won by Germany with 1–0 in the final against Sweden, after a golden goal.

UEFA Womens Championship European association football tournament for womens national teams

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro and unofficially the "European Cup", held every fourth year, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA Confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

Route to the final

GermanyRoundSweden
OpponentResult Group stage OpponentResult
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 4–1Match 1Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1–3
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 3–0Match 2Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 1–0
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 6–1Match 3Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 3–0
Group C winners
TeamPtsPldWDLGFGAGD
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 93300132+11
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 6320175+2
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 3310276+1
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 03003115−14
Final standings Group A runners-up
TeamPtsPldWDLGFGAGD
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 93300111+10
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 6320153+2
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 3310234–1
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 03003011−11
OpponentResult Knockout stage OpponentResult
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 7–1 Quarterfinals Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 2–1
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3–0 Semifinals Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2–1

Germany

Germany qualified by topping its qualification group, finishing with six wins, 30 goals scored, and one goal conceded. [8] They were placed in Group C alongside South American runners-up Argentina, North American runners-up Canada, and inter-continental play-off winner Japan. [9] [10] The team, managed by Tina Theune-Meyer and named an early favorite prior to the tournament, usually played in a 4–5–1 with Birgit Prinz or a 4–4–2 with Prinz and another striker, supported by Bettina Wiegmann leading the midfield and a roster of younger talent. [11] Germany conceded in the fourth minute of its opening match to Canada's Christine Sinclair, who headed in a free kick, but equalized before half-time from a penalty kick awarded for a handball and taken by Wiegmann. The Germans took the lead early in the second half on a header by Stefanie Gottschlich in the 47th minute, which was followed by goals by Birgit Prinz and substitute Kerstin Garefrekes to win 4–1. [12] [13]

Group C of the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup was one of four groups of nations, consisting of Argentina, Canada, Germany and Japan. It began on 20 September and its last matches were played on 27 September. Most matches were played at the Columbus Crew Stadium in Columbus. Germany won every match, while Argentina failed to win a match. Despite beating Argentina 6–0, Japan failed to advance, while a young Canada team surprisingly made the second round.

The Argentina women's national football team represents Argentina in international women's football.

Canada womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Canada

The Canada women's national soccer team is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

The team won 3–0 in their second match against Japan, taking first place in Group C with six points, by using its physical advantage and sustained attacks. Sandra Minnert scored in the 23rd minute on a rebound and was followed by strikes from Prinz in the 36th and 66th minutes. [14] Germany advanced to the knockout stage atop Group C by defeating Argentina 6–1 in their third match, earning nine points and outscoring opponents 13–2. The rout of Argentina began in the third minute with a goal for Maren Meinert, which was followed by another for her, a penalty for Wiegmann, and a half-volley for Prinz in the first half. The team lost defender Steffi Jones to a knee injury in the second half and conceded a consolation goal to Argentina before scoring twice at the end of the match to extend their lead. [15]

Sandra Minnert association football player

Sandra Minnert is a former German football defender. She played for SC 07 Bad Neuenahr and the German national team.

In sports, a blowout is an easy or one-sided victory. It occurs when one athletic team or individual performer outscores another by a large margin or in such a fashion that allows the second team or individual little chance of a victory from a point early in a competition, game, contest or event, e.g. Team A defeats Team B 75–10. The term is often used in reference to athletic competition, but it is used in other contexts such as electoral politics.

Maren Meinert Association footballer

Maren Meinert is a retired German football midfielder/striker and currently the coach for the German U-20 Women's squad. She played for FCR Duisburg, FFC Brauweiler Pulheim, and the Boston Breakers.

Germany played in the quarter-finals against Russia, runners-up of Group D, at PGE Park in Portland, Oregon. The team only managed a 1–0 lead at half-time, following a goal by Martina Müller in the 25th minute, due to the strong defense offered by the Russians. Germany broke through early in the second half and scored thrice in a five-minute span, including strikes by Minnert, substitute Pia Wunderlich, and Garefrekes. Russia scored a consolation goal in the 70th minute, but Germany scored another trio of goals in the last ten minutes—one more from Garefrekes and two from Prinz. [16] [17]

In the semi-finals, Germany faced the United States and defeated them 3–0 in a major upset of the defending champions and hosts. [18] Kerstin Garefrekes's header off a corner kick in the 15th minute opened the scoring for the Germans, while the United States responded by switching to an attack-minded 3–4–3 in the second half and squandered several chances to equalize, forcing saves out of goalkeeper Silke Rottenberg. The Americans pushed forward and left themselves open to counter-attacks, conceding two goals in stoppage time on breakaways that were scored by Meinert and Prinz. [19] [20]

Sweden

Sweden finished first in its qualification group, winning five matches and losing one with a 27–4 goal differential to best runners-up Denmark. [21] [22] They played in Group A, which was dubbed the Group of death for the strong lineup of defending world champions and hosts United States, African champions Nigeria, and Asian champions North Korea. [23] [24] Sweden lost 3–1 in their opening match against the United States in Washington, D.C., conceding twice in the first half to goals scored by Kristine Lilly and Cindy Parlow, both assisted by Mia Hamm. The lead was cut to 2–1 in the 55th minute by Victoria Sandell Svensson, who finished a long pass from Hanna Ljungberg, but American forward Shannon Boxx scored in the 78th minute to give the hosts a victory. [25]

Four days later in Philadelphia, Sweden defeated North Korea 1–0 with an early goal scored by Svensson scored in the seventh minute, tying them for second place in the group. [26] Sweden finished second in Group A and advanced to the quarter-finals after their 3–0 victory over Nigeria in Columbus, Ohio, scoring all three goals coming in the second half. Ljungberg scored twice in the 56th and 79th minutes, the former a header and latter a shot off a pass by Therese Sjoegran, and captain Malin Moström scored in the 81st minute on a breakaway. [27]

In the quarter-finals at Foxboro Stadium, Sweden faced Brazil, who had previously defeated them in the 1995 World Cup and 2000 Summer Olympics. [28] Svensson opened the scoring on a counterattack in the 23rd minute, but Brazil equalized before half-time through a penalty kick taken by Marta after she was tripped by goalkeeper Sofia Lundgren. Sweden were awarded a free kick 24 yards (22 m) from the goal in the 53rd minute, which was converted into a goal by Malin Andersson, while the team resisted several chances from Brazil to defeat them 2–1. [29]

The Swedes then played in the semi-finals against Canada, who had earned an upset victory over China in the quarter-finals. [30] The match remained scoreless in the first half and the deadlock was broken in the 64th minute by Canadian midfielder Kara Lang, who took a free kick from 35 yards (32 m) that slipped out of the hands of Lundgren and spun into the goal. [31] Swedish manager Marika Domanski-Lyfors used all three of her substitutions to bring on more attackers, and the equalizer was scored in the 79th minute by Malin Moström from a free kick. Substitute forward Josefine Öqvist scored the winning goal for Sweden six minutes later, finishing a rebound off a shot by Hanna Ljungberg that was saved by goalkeeper Taryn Swiatek. [32]

Venue

The 2003 final was played at the Home Depot Center, a 27,000-seat stadium in the Los Angeles suburb of Carson, California. The stadium was opened on 7 June 2003 as one of the first American venues to be designed primarily for soccer, serving as the home of the Los Angeles Galaxy of Major League Soccer (MLS). [33] The final was originally planned to take place at Hongkou Football Stadium in Shanghai, China, [34] but the tournament was moved to the United States after China's withdrawal in April 2003 due to the outbreak of SARS. [35] The Home Depot Center was chosen in June to host four matches during the group stage, the third place play-off, and the final. [36] [37] The Home Depot Center was also selected as the host of MLS Cup 2003, played on 23 November 2003, and MLS Cup 2004. [38] [39]

Match

Summary

Both teams played with 4–4–2 formations to begin the match, but Germany deployed one of its attackers in a deeper position instead of in tandem up top. Sweden held the majority of possession in the first half, winning more duels in the midfield and delivering several passes and crosses near the German goal, but were unable to score. [40] Hanna Ljungberg scored the opening goal for the Swedes in the 41st minute, but the Germans equalized early in the second half through a volley by Maren Meinert. [40] [41]

The match was won in the 98th minute by Nia Künzer's golden goal, the last to be scored in the FIFA Women's World Cup. [42] Künzer had been substituted in the 88th minute for Pia Wunderlich to provide fresh legs, and scored the golden goal off a free kick taken by midfielder Renate Lingor. [42]

Details

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg2–1 (a.e.t.)Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Meinert Soccerball shade.svg 46'
Künzer Soccerball shade gold.svg 98'
Report Ljungberg Soccerball shade.svg 41'
Home Depot Center , Carson, California
Attendance: 26,137
Referee: Cristina Babadac (Romania)
Kit left arm shoulder stripes black stripes half.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body shoulder stripes black stripes.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm shoulder stripes black stripes half.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts adidaswhite.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Germany [43]
Kit left arm blueborder.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm blueborder.png
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Sweden [43]
GK1 Silke Rottenberg
RB2 Kerstin Stegemann
CB17 Ariane Hingst
CB13 Sandra Minnert
LB19 Stefanie Gottschlich
RM18 Kerstin Garefrekes Sub off.svg 76'
CM10 Bettina Wiegmann (c)
CM6 Renate Lingor
LM7 Pia Wunderlich Sub off.svg 88'
SS14 Maren Meinert
CF9 Birgit Prinz
Substitutions:
FW11 Martina Müller Sub on.svg 76'
DF4 Nia Künzer Sub on.svg 88'
Manager:
Tina Theune-Meyer
GER-SWE (women) 2003-10-12.svg
GK1 Caroline Jönsson
RB4 Hanna Marklund
CB2 Karolina Westberg
CB3 Jane Törnqvist
LB7 Sara Larsson Sub off.svg 76'
RM9 Malin Andersson Sub off.svg 53'
CM6 Malin Moström (c)
CM18 Frida Östberg
LM17 Anna Sjöström Sub off.svg 53'
CF10 Hanna Ljungberg
CF11 Victoria Svensson
Substitutions:
MF14 Linda Fagerström Sub on.svg 53'
MF15 Therese Sjögran Sub on.svg 53'
DF5 Kristin Bengtsson Sub on.svg 76'
Manager:
Marika Domanski-Lyfors

Match officials

Post-match

Germany became the first team to surpass the United States at the top of the FIFA Women's World Rankings, which had been established just prior to the World Cup. [44] The two finalists went on to meet again in the bronze medal match at the 2004 Summer Olympics, which Germany won 1–0. [45] Germany became the first team to win consecutive Women's World Cups, defeating Brazil 2–0 in the 2007 final played in Shanghai. [46]

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