2003 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament

Last updated
2003 NCAA Division I
women's basketball tournament
2003 NCAA Women's Final Four logo.svg
2003 Women's Final Four logo
Teams64
Finals site Georgia Dome
Atlanta, Georgia
Champions Connecticut Huskies (4th title)
Runner-up Tennessee Volunteers (10th title game)
Semifinalists
MOP Diana Taurasi (Connecticut)
NCAA Division I women's tournaments
« 2002 2004 »

The 2003 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 22, 2003, and concluded on April 8, 2003, when the Connecticut Huskies (UConn) won their second straight national title. The Final Four was held at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, Georgia on April 6–8, 2003. UConn, coached by Geno Auriemma, defeated archrival Tennessee, coached by Pat Summitt, 73–68 in the championship game. UConn's Diana Taurasi was named Most Outstanding Player.

Contents

This was the first year of a new format, in which the final game is held on the Tuesday following the men's championship, in contrast to prior years, when it was held on Sunday evening, between the men's semi-final and final. The game now is the final game of the Division 1 collegiate basketball season.

Tournament records

Qualifying teams – automatic

Sixty-four teams were selected to participate in the 2003 NCAA Tournament. Thirty-one conferences were eligible for an automatic bid to the 2003 NCAA tournament. [1]

Automatic bids
  Record 
Qualifying schoolConferenceRegular
Season
ConferenceSeed
Alabama State University SWAC 20–1015–316
Austin Peay State University Ohio Valley Conference 27–316–014
Boston University America East 16–1410–616
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Southern Conference 26–416–212
Duke University ACC 31–116–01
The George Washington University Atlantic 10 24–615–17
Georgia State University Atlantic Sun Conference 20–1012–416
University of Wisconsin–Green Bay Horizon League 27–315–18
Hampton University MEAC 23–816–115
Harvard University Ivy League 22–414–014
College of the Holy Cross Patriot League 24–713–113
Liberty University Big South Conference 26–314–013
Louisiana Tech University WAC 29–218–05
Louisiana State University SEC 27–311–31
Manhattan College MAAC 20–915–314
Missouri State University Missouri Valley Conference 18–1211–715
University of New Mexico Mountain West 22–89–56
Old Dominion University Colonial 21–1015–312
Pepperdine University West Coast Conference 22–712–212
Purdue University Big Ten 26–512–42
St. Francis (PA) Northeast Conference 23–716–215
Stanford University Pac-10 26–415–33
Texas Christian University Conference USA 19–138–69
University of Texas at Austin Big 12 25–515–12
Texas State University Southland 18–1314–616
University of California, Santa Barbara Big West Conference 26–415–17
Valparaiso University Mid-Continent 18–128–615
Villanova University Big East 25–512–42
Weber State University Big Sky Conference 21–811–313
Western Kentucky University Sun Belt Conference 22–812–213
Western Michigan University MAC 20–1110–614

Qualifying teams – at-large

Thirty-three additional teams were selected to complete the sixty-four invitations. [1]

At-large Bids
  Record 
Qualifying schoolConferenceRegular
season
ConferenceSeed
University of Arizona Pacific-1022–813–56
University of Arkansas Southeastern21–107–77
Boston College Big East20–812–45
Brigham Young University Mountain West19–118–611
University of North Carolina at Charlotte Conference USA21–812–212
University of Cincinnati Conference USA23–711–310
University of Colorado at Boulder Big 1222–711–56
University of Connecticut Big East31–116–01
DePaul University Conference USA22–910–49
University of Georgia Southeastern19–910–45
Georgia Institute of Technology Atlantic Coast20–108–810
University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign Big Ten17–119–79
Kansas State University Big 1228–414–23
University of Miami Big East18–128–811
Michigan State University Big Ten17–1110–68
University of Minnesota Big Ten23–512–46
Mississippi State University Southeastern23–710–43
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Atlantic Coast27–513–33
University of Notre Dame Big East19–1010–611
Ohio State University Big Ten21–910–64
University of Oklahoma Big 1219–129–710
Pennsylvania State University Big Ten24–813–34
Rutgers University Big East20–713–34
University of South Carolina Southeastern22–79–55
University of Tennessee Southeastern28–414–01
Texas Tech University Big 1226–513–32
Tulane University Conference USA19–910–411
University of Utah Mountain West23–612–28
Vanderbilt University Southeastern21–99–54
University of Virginia Atlantic Coast16–139–78
Virginia Tech Big East21–910–67
University of Washington Pacific-1022–713–59
Xavier University Atlantic 1020–911–510

Bids by conference

Thirty-one conferences earned an automatic bid. In twenty-two cases, the automatic bid was the only representative from the conference. Thirty-three additional at-large teams were selected from nine of the conferences. [1]

BidsConferenceTeams
7 Big East Villanova, Boston College, Connecticut, Miami Fla., Notre Dame, Rutgers, Virginia Tech
7 Southeastern LSU, Arkansas, Georgia, Mississippi St., South Carolina, Tennessee, Vanderbilt
6 Big Ten Purdue, Illinois, Michigan St., Minnesota, Ohio St., Penn St.
5 Big 12 Texas, Colorado, Kansas St., Oklahoma, Texas Tech
5 Conference USA TCU, Charlotte, Cincinnati, DePaul, Tulane
4 Atlantic Coast Duke, Georgia Tech, North Carolina, Virginia
3 Mountain West New Mexico, BYU, Utah
3 Pacific-10 Stanford, Arizona, Washington
2 Atlantic 10 George Washington, Xavier
1 America East Boston U.
1 Atlantic Sun Georgia St.
1 Big Sky Weber St.
1 Big South Liberty
1 Big West UC Santa Barb.
1 Colonial Old Dominion
1 Horizon Green Bay
1 Ivy Harvard
1 Metro Atlantic Manhattan
1 Mid-American Western Mich.
1 Mid-Continent Valparaiso
1 Mid-Eastern Hampton
1 Missouri Valley Missouri St.
1 Northeast St. Francis Pa.
1 Ohio Valley Austin Peay
1 Patriot Holy Cross
1 Southern Chattanooga
1 Southland Texas St.
1 Southwestern Alabama St.
1 Sun Belt Western Ky.
1 West Coast Pepperdine
1 Western Athletic Louisiana Tech

First and second rounds

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West Lafayette
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Storrs
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Manhattan
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Norfolk
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Norman
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Knoxville
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Boulder
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University Park
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Athens
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Raleigh
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Albuquerque
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Lubbock
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Eugene
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Stanford
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Cincinnati
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Ruston
2003 NCAA NCAA first and second round venues

In 2003, the field remained at 64 teams. The teams were seeded, and assigned to four geographic regions, with seeds 1–16 in each region. In Round 1, seeds 1 and 16 faced each other, as well as seeds 2 and 15, seeds 3 and 14, seeds 4 and 13, seeds 5 and 12, seeds 6 and 11, seeds 7 and 10, and seeds 8 and 9. In 2003, a change was implemented in the way first and second round sites were determined. From 1982 (the year of the first NCAA women's basketball tournament) through 2002, the first rounds sites were offered to the top seeds. Starting in 2003, sixteen sites for the first two rounds were determined approximately a year before the team selections and seedings were completed. [2]

The following table lists the region, host school, venue and the sixteen first and second round locations: [3]

RegionRndHostVenueCityState
East 1&2 Purdue University Mackey Arena West Lafayette Indiana
East 1&2 University of Connecticut Harry A. Gampel Pavilion Storrs Connecticut
East 1&2 Kansas State University Bramlage Coliseum Manhattan Kansas
East 1&2 Old Dominion University Ted Constant Convocation Center Norfolk Virginia
Mideast 1&2 University of Oklahoma Lloyd Noble Center Norman Oklahoma
Mideast 1&2 University of Tennessee Thompson-Boling Arena Knoxville Tennessee
Mideast 1&2 University of Colorado CU Events Center (Coors Events Center) Boulder Colorado
Mideast 1&2 Pennsylvania State University Bryce Jordan Center University Park Pennsylvania
Midwest 1&2 University of Georgia Georgia Coliseum (Stegeman Coliseum) Athens Georgia
Midwest 1&2 North Carolina State University Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
Midwest 1&2 University of New Mexico The Pit (arena) Albuquerque New Mexico
Midwest 1&2 Texas Tech University United Spirit Arena Lubbock Texas
West 1&2 University of Oregon McArthur Court Eugene Oregon
West 1&2 Stanford University Maples Pavilion Stanford California
West 1&2 University of Cincinnati Shoemaker Center Cincinnati Ohio
West 1&2 Louisiana Tech University Thomas Assembly Center Ruston Louisiana

Regionals and Final Four

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Dayton
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Knoxville
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Albuquerque
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Stanford
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Atlanta
2003 NCAA regionals and Final Four

The Regionals, named for the general location, were held from March 22 to March 25 at these sites: [4]

Each regional winner advanced to the Final Four held April 6 and April 8 in Atlanta, Georgia at the Georgia Dome, (Host: Georgia Institute of Technology)

Bids by state

The sixty-four teams came from thirty-two states, plus Washington, D.C. Virginia had the most teams with five bids. Eighteen states did not have any teams receiving bids. [1]

NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 2003 NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 2003.svg
NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 2003
BidsStateTeams
5 Virginia Hampton, Liberty, Old Dominion, Virginia, Virginia Tech
4 Massachusetts Boston U., Harvard, Holy Cross, Boston College
4 Tennessee Austin Peay, Chattanooga, Tennessee, Vanderbilt
4 Texas TCU, Texas, Texas St., Texas Tech
3 California Pepperdine, Stanford, UC Santa Barb.
3 Georgia Georgia St., Georgia, Georgia Tech
3 Indiana Purdue, Valparaiso, Notre Dame
3 Louisiana Louisiana Tech, LSU, Tulane
3 North Carolina Duke, Charlotte, North Carolina
3 Ohio Cincinnati, Ohio St., Xavier
3 Utah Weber St., BYU, Utah
2 Illinois DePaul, Illinois
2 Michigan Western Mich., Michigan St.
2 New York Manhattan, St. Francis Pa.
2 Pennsylvania Villanova, Penn St.
1 Alabama Alabama St.
1 Arizona Arizona
1 Arkansas Arkansas
1 Colorado Colorado
1 Connecticut Connecticut
1 District of Columbia George Washington
1 Florida Miami Fla.
1 Kansas Kansas St.
1 Kentucky Western Ky.
1 Minnesota Minnesota
1 Mississippi Mississippi St.
1 Missouri Missouri St.
1 New Jersey Rutgers
1 New Mexico New Mexico
1 Oklahoma Oklahoma
1 South Carolina South Carolina
1 Washington Washington
1 Wisconsin Green Bay

Brackets

Data Source [5]

Mideast Region – Knoxville, Tennessee

First round
March 22 and 23
Second round
March 24 and 25
Regional semifinals
March 29
Regional finals
March 31
            
1 Tennessee 95
16 Alabama State 43
1 Tennessee81
8 Virginia 51
8 Virginia 72
9 Illinois 56
1 Tennessee86
4 Penn State 58
5 South Carolina 68
12 UT-Chattanooga 54
5 South Carolina 67
4 Penn State77
4 at Penn State 64
13 Holy Cross 33
1 Tennessee73
2 Villanova 49
6 at Colorado 84
11 BYU 45
6 Colorado86
3 North Carolina 67
3 North Carolina 72
14 Austin Peay 70
6 Colorado 51
2 Villanova53
7 George Washington 71
10 at Oklahoma 61
7 George Washington 57
2 Villanova70
2 Villanova 51
15 St. Francis (PA) 36

Midwest Region – Albuquerque, New Mexico

First round
March 22 and 23
Second round
March 24 and 25
Regional semifinals
March 29
Regional finals
March 31
            
1 Duke 66
16 Georgia State 48
1 Duke65
8 Utah 54
8 Utah 73
9 DePaul 64
1 Duke66
5 Georgia 63
5 at Georgia 80
12 Charlotte 61
5 Georgia74
4 Rutgers 64
4 Rutgers 64
13 Western Kentucky 52
1 Duke80
2 Texas Tech 79
6 at New Mexico 91
11 Miami (FL) 85
6 New Mexico73
3 Miss. St. 61
3 Miss. St. 73
14 Manhattan 47
6 New Mexico 76
2 Texas Tech81
7 UC Santa Barbara 71
10 Xavier 62
7 UC Santa Barbara 48
2 Texas Tech71
2 at Texas Tech 67
15 Missouri State 59

East Region – Dayton, Ohio

First round
March 22 and 23
Second round
March 24 and 25
Regional semifinals
March 30
Regional finals
April 1
            
1 at Connecticut 91
16 Boston University 44
1 Connecticut81
9 TCU 66
8 Michigan State 47
9 TCU 50
1 Connecticut70
5 Boston College 49
5 Boston College 73
12 at Old Dominion 72
5 Boston College86
4 Vanderbilt 85
4 Vanderbilt 54
13 Liberty 44
1 Connecticut73
2 Purdue 64
6 Arizona 47
11 Notre Dame 59
11 Notre Dame59
3 Kansas State 53
3 at Kansas State 79
14 Harvard 69
11 Notre Dame 47
2 Purdue66
7 Virginia Tech 61
10 Georgia Tech 59
7 Virginia Tech 62
2 Purdue80
2 at Purdue 66
15 Valparaiso 51

West Region – Stanford, California

First round
March 22 and 23
Second round
March 24 and 25
Regional semifinals
March 30
Regional finals
April 1
            
1 LSU 86
16 Texas State 50
1 LSU80
8 Green Bay 69
8 Green Bay 78
9 Washington 65
1 LSU69
5 Louisiana Tech 63
5 at Louisiana Tech 94
12 Pepperdine 60
5 Louisiana Tech74
4 Ohio State 61
4 Ohio State 66
13 Weber State 44
1 LSU 60
2 Texas78
6 Minnesota 68
11 Tulane 48
6 Minnesota68
3 Stanford 56
3 at Stanford 82
14 Western Michigan 66
6 Minnesota 60
2 Texas73
7 Arkansas 71
10 at Cincinnati 57
7 Arkansas 50
2 Texas67
2 Texas 90
15 Hampton 46

Final Four – Atlanta, Georgia

National semifinals
April 6
National championship
April 8
      
ME1 Tennessee66
MW1 Duke 56
ME1 Tennessee 68
E1 Connecticut73
E1 Connecticut71
W2 Texas 69

E-East; ME-Mideast; MW-Midwest; W-West.

Record by conference

Conference# of BidsRecordWin %Round
of 32
Sweet
Sixteen
Elite
Eight
Final
Four
Championship
Game
Big East L 15–6 .714 L L 2 1 1
Southeastern 7 14–7 .667 7 3 2 1 1
Big Ten 6 8–6 .571 4 3 1 0 0
Big 12 5 10–5 .667 4 3 2 1 0
Conference USA 5 1–5 .167 1 0 0 0 0
Atlantic Coast 4 6–4 .600 3 1 1 1 0
Mountain West 3 3–3 .500 2 1 0 0 0
Pacific-10 3 1–3 .250 1 0 0 0 0
Atlantic 10 2 1–2 .333 1 0 0 0 0
Western Athletic 1 2–1 .667 1 1 0 0 0
Big West 1 1–1 .500 1 0 0 0 0
Horizon 1 1–1 .500 1 0 0 0 0

Nineteen conferences went 0–1: America East, Atlantic Sun Conference, Big Sky Conference, Big South Conference, Colonial, Ivy League, MAAC, MAC, Mid-Continent, MEAC, Missouri Valley Conference, Northeast Conference, Ohio Valley Conference, Patriot League, Southern Conference, Southland, SWAC, Sun Belt Conference, and West Coast Conference

All-Tournament team

Game officials

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Nixon, Rick. "Official 2022 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 22 April 2012.
  2. HAVEL, CARRIE J. (2005). "The NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Championship: an analysis of first and second rounds and the change to predetermined sites" (PDF). p. 1. Retrieved 20 April 2012.
  3. "Attendance and Sites" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 19 March 2012.
  4. "2003 DIVISION I WOMEN'S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP HANDBOOK" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 19 April 2012.
  5. "Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book". NCAA. February 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-17.

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