2004–05 in English football

Last updated
Football in England
Season2004–05
Men's football
FA Premier League Chelsea
Championship Sunderland
League One Luton Town
League Two Yeovil Town
Barnet
FA Cup Arsenal
League Cup Chelsea
Community Shield Arsenal
  2003–04 Flag of England.svg 2005–06  

The 2004–05 season was the 125th season of competitive football in England.

Contents

Overview

Diary of the season

National team

England began their qualifying campaign for the 2006 FIFA World Cup. They played alongside UK neighbours Wales and Northern Ireland in the European Group 6.

DateVenueOpponentsScore*CompetitionEngland scorersMatch Report
18 August 2004 St James' Park, Newcastle upon Tyne (H)Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 3–0F David Beckham, Michael Owen, Shaun Wright-Phillips [27]
4 September 2004 Ernst-Happel-Stadion, Vienna (A)Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 2–2WCQ Frank Lampard, Steven Gerrard [28]
8 September 2004 Silesian Stadium, Chorzów / Katowice (A)Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 2–1WCQ Jermain Defoe, Arkadiusz Głowacki (o.g.) [29]
9 October 2004 Old Trafford, Manchester (H)Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 2–0WCQ Frank Lampard, David Beckham [30]
13 October 2004 Tofiq Bahramov Republican Stadium, Baku (A)Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 1–0WCQ Michael Owen [31]
17 November 2004 Bernabeu, Madrid (A)Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 0–1F [32]
9 February 2005 Villa Park, Birmingham (H)Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 0–0F  [33]
26 March 2005 Old Trafford, Manchester (H)Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 4–0WCQ Joe Cole, Michael Owen, Chris Baird (o.g.), Frank Lampard [34]
30 March 2005 St James' Park, Newcastle upon Tyne (H)Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 2–0WCQ Steven Gerrard, David Beckham [35]
28 May 2005 Soldier Field, Chicago (A)Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2–1F Kieran Richardson (2) [36]
31 May 2005 Giants Stadium, East Rutherford (N)Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 3–2F Michael Owen (3) [37]

* England score given first

Key

Final standings

FA Premier League

Chelsea, in their first season under new manager José Mourinho, broke records as they won their first League title for 50 years, losing just one Premiership game all season and setting a top-flight record of 29 wins and 95 points, in addition to winning the League Cup. Arsenal (unbeaten league champions a year earlier) extended their unbeaten run to 49 games before a controversial loss at Manchester United ended this remarkable achievement. Despite this, The Gunners were Chelsea's closest challengers and finished in second place, 12 points behind. United kept the two London teams under pressure with their own impressive league form since ending Arsenal's run, but slipped up and ultimately took third place. Everton, who had only just avoided relegation a year earlier, surprised all the observers by clinching the fourth Champions League place (even more remarkable considering they lost striker Wayne Rooney to Manchester United at the end of August). Liverpool, in their first season under Rafa Benítez, suffered from indifferent domestic form and finished in fifth place, finishing much closer to the relegation zone in terms of points than the top.

Despite this, however, Benítez showed off his impressive managerial skills with an unforeseen and staggering Champions League run that took them to the final in Istanbul against highly regarded and highly tipped Italian club Milan, forcing the game into extra time and penalties. Liverpool kept the advantage in the shootout, winning 3–2 and ending a 21-year wait to win Europe's elite competition. This stunning achievement, considering Liverpool's poor domestic form that season, was enough for UEFA to allow Liverpool to become the fifth English team in next year's competition to take part, a first for European football.

Bolton Wanderers finished sixth – their highest league finish in decades and just a lower goal difference keeping them behind Liverpool – to qualify for the UEFA Cup, having never played in Europe before. Middlesbrough joined them, finishing seventh.

All three relegation places were decided on the final day of the season, for the first time in Premier League history. Crystal Palace, Norwich City and Southampton (after 27 years) went down, but West Bromwich Albion managed to stay up despite being bottom before the games started and also having the worst record of any Premiership team to avoid relegation (six wins and 34 points). They were also the first-ever Premiership team to avoid relegation after being bottom on Christmas Day, and the first top-flight team to achieve this feat since Sheffield United in 1991.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification or relegation
1 Chelsea (C)3829817215+5795Qualification for the Champions League group stage
2 Arsenal 3825858736+5183
3 Manchester United 38221155826+3277Qualification for the Champions League third qualifying round
4 Everton 38187134546161
5 Liverpool 38177145241+1158Qualification for the Champions League first qualifying round [lower-alpha 1]
6 Bolton Wanderers 381610124944+558Qualification for the UEFA Cup first round [lower-alpha 2]
7 Middlesbrough 381413115346+755
8 Manchester City 381313124739+852
9 Tottenham Hotspur 381410144741+652
10 Aston Villa 381211154552747
11 Charlton Athletic 3812101642581646
12 Birmingham City 381112154046645
13 Fulham 38128185260844
14 Newcastle United 3810141447571044Qualification for the Intertoto Cup third round
15 Blackburn Rovers 389151432431142
16 Portsmouth 381091943591639
17 West Bromwich Albion 386161636612534
18 Crystal Palace (R)387121941622133Relegation to the Football League Championship
19 Norwich City (R)387121942773533
20 Southampton (R)386141845662132
Source: Premier League
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. Although they failed to qualify for the Champions League as one of the top four English clubs, Liverpool were given a special dispensation to compete as the defending champions. They were, however, forced to enter in the first qualifying round. See Liverpool F.C. 2005–06 UEFA Champions League qualification for details.
  2. Since the finalists of the FA Cup, Arsenal and Manchester United, as well as Chelsea, who won the 2004–05 Football League Cup, were qualified for the Champions League, and the fifth-placed team (Liverpool) were moved to the Champions League, the sixth and seventh-placed teams in the Premier League were rewarded entry to the UEFA Cup.

Leading goalscorer: Thierry Henry (Arsenal)- 25

The Football League

Football League Championship

After narrowly missing out on promotion the previous season, Sunderland clinched a return to the top-flight as champions. Wigan Athletic joined them as runners-up, entering the top-tier for the first time in their history and giving manager Paul Jewell his second promotion to the Premier League in six years. West Ham United made amends for their loss in the play-off final the previous year by beating Preston North End.

Unusually, none of the sides relegated to the Championship in 2003–04 did particularly well. While Leeds United were widely predicted for a second successive relegation and possible bankruptcy (both of which looked likely in the middle of the season, but were staved off by another takeover), Wolverhampton Wanderers and Leicester City were predicted to challenge for promotion. Instead, both sides started badly, and replaced their managers mid-season, never really looking like promotion contenders.

At the bottom of the table, Rotherham United and Gillingham's luck finally ran out, and both were relegated after a short few years in which both clubs battled the odds on small budgets. What made bigger headlines was Nottingham Forest's relegation to League One, six years after they were in the Premiership, and which made them the first European Cup winners to drop to the third division of their domestic league. Dario Gradi's Crewe Alexandra managed to survive relegation on the last day of the season in their 2–1 win over Coventry City, which was their first win without striker Dean Ashton, who was sold to Norwich City for £3 million.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsPromotion, qualification or relegation
1 Sunderland (C, P)46297107641+3594Promotion to the FA Premier League
2 Wigan Athletic (P)46251297935+4487
3 Ipswich Town 46241398556+2985Qualification for Championship play-offs
4 Derby County 462210147160+1176
5 Preston North End 462112136758+975
6 West Ham United (O, P)462110156656+1073
7 Reading 461913145144+770
8 Sheffield United 461813155756+167
9 Wolverhampton Wanderers 461521107259+1366
10 Millwall 461812165145+666
11 Queens Park Rangers 461711185458462
12 Stoke City 461710193638261
13 Burnley 461515163839160
14 Leeds United 461418144952360
15 Leicester City 461221134946+357
16 Cardiff City 461315184851354
17 Plymouth Argyle 4614112152641253
18 Watford 461216185259752
19 Coventry City 4613132061731252
20 Brighton & Hove Albion 4613122140652551
21 Crewe Alexandra 4612142066862050
22 Gillingham (R)4612142045662150Relegation to Football League One
23 Nottingham Forest (R)469172042662444
24 Rotherham United (R)465142735693429
Updated to match(es) played on 9 December 2011. Source: Football League Tables
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (P) Promoted; (R) Relegated.

Leading goalscorer: Nathan Ellington (Wigan Athletic) – 24

Football League One

Luton Town performed the best out of any League side to clinch promotion. Hull City joined them, their second promotion in as many seasons. Sheffield Wednesday – who looked like spending another season fighting relegation in the first few months – returned to the Championship under new manager Paul Sturrock, who put his sacking at Southampton behind him to lead Wednesday to their best season in nearly a decade.

Going down to League Two were Stockport, who continued their decline which began with relegation from Division One in 2001–02, Peterborough United, feeling the strain of their financial situation, soon followed. Torquay United, whose first season out of the bottom division in 12 years, ended in disappointment and they were also relegated. The fourth relegated side would have been Milton Keynes Dons (formerly Wimbledon), but Wrexham went into administration and lost ten points as a result (despite the club's argument that it would be harder for them to exit administration if they were relegated).

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsPromotion or relegation
1 Luton Town (C, P)46291168748+3998Promotion to 2005–06 Football League Championship
2 Hull City (P)46268128053+2786
3 Tranmere Rovers 462213117355+1879Qualification for League One play-offs
4 Brentford 46229155760375
5 Sheffield Wednesday (P)461915127759+1872
6 Hartlepool United 46218177666+1071
7 Bristol City 461816127457+1770
8 Bournemouth 462010167764+1370
9 Huddersfield Town 462010167465+970
10 Doncaster Rovers 461618126560+566
11 Bradford City 461714156462+265
12 Swindon Town 461712176668263
13 Barnsley 461419136964+561
14 Walsall 461612186569460
15 Colchester United 461417156050+1059
16 Blackpool 461512195459557
17 Chesterfield 461415175562757
18 Port Vale 461752449591056
19 Oldham Athletic 4614102260731352
20 Milton Keynes Dons 4612151954681451
21 Torquay United (R)4612151955792451Relegation to 2005–06 Football League Two
22 Wrexham (R)4613141962801843 [lower-alpha 1]
23 Peterborough United (R)469122549732439
24 Stockport County (R)46683249984926
Updated to match(es) played on May 2005. Source: [ citation needed ]
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) Champion; (P) Promoted; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. Wrexham deducted 10 points for entering administration. [38]

Leading goalscorer: Stuart Elliott (Hull City) – 27, and Dean Windass (Bradford City) – 27

Football League Two

Just two years after winning the Conference, Yeovil Town followed in Doncaster Rovers' footsteps by winning the League Two title. Scunthorpe United – relegation candidates the season before – joined them, while Swansea City edged the last automatic promotion spot. The side that they edged out, Southend United, made amends by winning the play-offs, beating Lincoln City in the final.

At the bottom, Cambridge United and Kidderminster Harriers' finances hit them hard, and they fell out of the league, both on the back of signing several foreign players who proved ineffective. While Cambridge went into administration, this happened after they were already relegated, and made no difference overall, short of lifting Kidderminster above them.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsPromotion or relegation
1 Yeovil Town (C, P)46258139065+2583Promotion to League One
2 Scunthorpe United (P)462214106942+2780
3 Swansea City (P)46248146243+1980
4 Southend United (P)462212126546+1978Qualification for League Two play-offs
5 Macclesfield Town 46229156049+1175
6 Lincoln City 462012146447+1772
7 Northampton Town 462012146251+1172
8 Darlington 462012145749+872
9 Rochdale 461618125448+666
10 Wycombe Wanderers 461714155852+665
11 Leyton Orient 461615156567263
12 Bristol Rovers 461321126057+360
13 Mansfield Town 461515165656060
14 Cheltenham Town 461612185154360
15 Oxford United 4616111950631359
16 Boston United 461416166258+458
17 Bury 461416165454058
18 Grimsby Town 461416165152158
19 Notts County 4613132046621652
20 Chester City 4612161843692652
21 Shrewsbury Town 461116194853549
22 Rushden & Diamonds 4610142242632144
23 Kidderminster Harriers (R)461082839854638Relegation to Conference National
24 Cambridge United (R)468162239622330 [lower-alpha 1]
Updated to match(es) played on 15 September 2009. Source: 2004–05 League Two
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) Champion; (P) Promoted; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. Cambridge United deducted 10 points for entering administration [39]

Leading goalscorer: Phil Jevons (Yeovil Town) – 27

Non-League Football

CompetitionWinners
Conference National winners Barnet
Conference National playoff winners Carlisle United
Conference North winners Southport
Conference South winners Grays Athletic
FA Trophy winners Grays Athletic
FA Vase winners Didcot Town

Famous debutants

Transfer deals

Summer transfer window

The summer transfer window runs from the end of the previous season until 31 August.

January transfer window

The mid-season transfer window runs from 1 to 31 January 2005.

For subsequent transfer deals see 2005–06 in English football.

Retirements

Deaths

Related Research Articles

2004–05 FA Premier League 13th season of the Premier League

The 2004–05 FA Premier League began on 14 August 2004 and ended on 15 May 2005. Arsenal were the defending champions after going unbeaten the previous season. Chelsea won the title with a then record 95 points, which was previously set by Manchester United in the 1993–94 season, and later surpassed by Manchester City in the 2017–18 season (100), securing the title with a 2–0 win at the Reebok Stadium against Bolton Wanderers. Chelsea also broke a number of other records during their campaign, most notably breaking the record of most games won in a single Premier League campaign, securing 29 wins in the league in home and away matches, which was later surpassed by themselves in the 2016–17 season.

The 2003–04 season was the 124th season of association football in England.

The 2002–03 season was the 123rd season of competitive football in England.

The 2005–06 season was the 126th season of competitive association football in England.

The 2000–01 FA Premier League was the ninth FA Premier League season and the third season running which ended with Manchester United as champions and Arsenal as runners-up. Sir Alex Ferguson became the first manager to win three successive English league titles with the same club. Liverpool, meanwhile, managed a unique cup treble – winning the FA Cup, League Cup and UEFA Cup. They also finished third in the Premier League and qualified for the Champions League. Nike replaced Mitre as manufacturer of the official Premier League match ball, a contract that has since been extended multiple times, with the most recent renewal made in November 2018 to the end of the 2024–25 season.

2005–06 FA Premier League 14th season of the Premier League

The 2005–06 FA Premier League began on 13 August 2005, and concluded on 7 May 2006. The season saw Chelsea retain their title after defeating Manchester United 3–0 at Stamford Bridge towards the end of April. On the same day, West Bromwich Albion and Birmingham City were relegated, joining Sunderland in the Championship for the following season. Chelsea drew the record they set the previous season, with 29 wins in home and away campaigns.

The 2000–01 season was the 121st season of competitive football in England.

The 1992–93 season was the 113th season of football in England. The season saw the Premier League in its first season, replacing Division One of the Football League as the top league in England. Every team in the Premier League played each other twice within the season, one game away and one at home, and were awarded three points for a win and one for a draw.

The 1996–97 season was the 117th season of competitive football in England. Promotion to and relegation from the Football League returned after a three-season absence, with one relegation spot in Division Three.

The 1985–86 season was the 106th season of competitive football in England.

The 1970–71 season was the 91st season of competitive football in England.

The 1993–94 season was the 114th season of competitive football in England.

The 1998–99 season was the 119th season of competitive football in England.

The 1999–2000 season was the 120th season of competitive football in England.

The 2010–11 season was the 131st season of competitive football in England.

The 2011–12 season was the 132nd season of competitive football in England.

The 2012–13 Premier League was the 21st season of the Premier League, the English professional league for association football clubs, since its establishment in 1992. The fixture schedule was released on 18 June 2012. The season began on 18 August 2012 and ended on 19 May 2013.

Following the breakaway from the Football League, the new top tier of English football was named the Premier League for the start of the 1992–93 season. The following page details the football records and statistics of the Premier League.

2013–14 Premier League

The 2013–14 Premier League was the 22nd season of the Premier League, the top-flight English professional league for men's football clubs. The fixtures were announced on 19 June 2013. The season started on Saturday 17 August 2013, and concluded on Sunday 11 May 2014.

The 2013–14 season was the 134th season of competitive football in England.

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