2004 Seattle Mariners season

Last updated

2004 Seattle Mariners
Edgar Martínez's final season
Major League affiliations
Location
Results
Record63–99 (.389)
Divisional place4th
Other information
Owner(s) Hiroshi Yamauchi
(represented by Howard Lincoln)
General manager(s) Bill Bavasi
Manager(s) Bob Melvin
Local television KSTW 11
FSN Northwest
Local radio KOMO (AM) 1000 AM
(Dave Niehaus, Rick Rizzs,
Ron Fairly, Dave Valle,
Dave Henderson)
< Previous season       Next season >

The Seattle Mariners 2004 season was their 28th, and they finished last in the American League West at 63–99. Ichiro Suzuki set the major league record for hits in a season on October 1, breaking George Sisler's 84-year-old mark with a pair of early singles. [1]

Contents

Offseason

Regular season

At the All-Star Break, the Mariners had lost nine straight and were at 32–54 (.372), seventeen games behind the division-leading Texas Rangers. [4]

On October 1, Ichiro Suzuki set the major league record for hits, breaking George Sisler's 84-year-old mark with a pair of early singles. [5] It was his 258th hit of the season. Later in the game, Suzuki got another hit, giving him 259 this season and a major league-leading .373 average. Fireworks exploded after Suzuki's big hit reached the outfield, creating a haze over Safeco Field, and his teammates mobbed him at first base. The crowd of 45,573 was the ninth sellout this season. [5] After the record breaking hit, Suzuki ran to the first-base seats, bowed respectfully and then shook hands with Sisler's 81-year-old daughter, Frances Sisler Drochelman, and other members of the Hall of Famer's family. [5] Fans in downtown Tokyo watched Suzuki in sports bars and on big-screen monitors. Seattle's hitting coach that season was Paul Molitor. Sisler set the hits record in 1920 with the St. Louis Browns over a 154-game schedule. Suzuki broke it in the Mariners' 160th game. [5] Suzuki's hit came off Ryan Drese, boosting Suzuki to 10-for-20 lifetime against him. Suzuki's sixth-inning infield single came off John Wasdin. After Suzuki's 258th hit, he scored his 100th run of the season when the Mariners batted around in the third, taking a 6-2 lead on six hits. [5] Suzuki's first-inning single was his 919th hit in the majors, breaking the record for most hits over a four-year span. Bill Terry of the New York Giants set the previous record of 918 hits from 1929-32. [5] Suzuki has 921 hits in four seasons.

Opening Day box score

Mariners' lineup

Batting AB R H RBI BB SO BA
Ichiro Suzuki (RF)411011.250
Randy Winn (CF)500001.000
Bret Boone (2B)500002.000
Raúl Ibañez (LF)311011.333
Edgar Martínez (DH)301112.000
John Olerud (1B)411000.000
Rich Aurilia (SS)401001.250
Dan Wilson (C)401000.250
Willie Bloomquist (3B)201101.500

Source: [6]

Draft

In the 2004 Major League Baseball draft, the Mariners selected Matt Tuiasosopo in the third round for their first pick overall. [7] Out of the 48 players selected by the Mariners in 2004, 5 have played in Major League Baseball including Tuiasosopo, Rob Johnson, Mark Lowe, Michael Saunders, and James Russell. [7]

Season standings

AL West W L Pct. GB Home Road
Anaheim Angels 92700.56845–3647–34
Oakland Athletics 91710.562152–2939–42
Texas Rangers 89730.549351–3038–43
Seattle Mariners 63990.3892938–4425–55

Record vs. opponents

2004 American League Records

Sources:
TeamANABALBOSCWSCLEDETKCMINNYYOAKSEATBTEXTORNL 
Anaheim 6–34–55–44–57–27–05–45–410–913–76–19–104–57–11
Baltimore 3–610–92–43–36–06–34–55–140–77–211–85–211–85–13
Boston 5–49–104–23–46–14–22–411–88–15–414–54–514–59–9
Chicago 4–54–22–410–98–1113–69–103–42–77–24–26–33–48–10
Cleveland 5–43–34–39–109–1011–87–122–46–35–43–31–85–210–8
Detroit 2–70–61–611–810–98–117–124–34–55–43–34–54–29–9
Kansas City 0–73–62–46–138–1111–87–121–52–72–53–64–53–36–12
Minnesota 4–55–44–210–912–712–712–72–42–55–44–55–24–211–7
New York 4–514–58–114–34–23–45–14–27–26–315–45–412–710–8
Oakland 9–107–01–87–23–65–47–25–22–711–87–211–96–310–8
Seattle 7–132–74–52–74–54–55–24–53–68–112–57–122–79–9
Tampa Bay 1–68–115–142–43–33–36–35–44–152–75–22–79–915–3
Texas 10–92–55–43–68–15–45–42–54–59–1112–77–27–210–8
Toronto 5–48–115–144–32–52–43–32–47–123–67–29–92–78–10

Transactions

Roster

2004 Seattle Mariners
Roster
PitchersCatchers

Infielders

OutfieldersManager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In

PlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI

Other batters

PlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI

Starting pitchers

PlayerGIPWLERASO

Other pitchers

PlayerGIPWLERA
Relief pitchers
PlayerGWLSVERASO

Awards and honors

Farm system

LevelTeamLeagueManager
AAA Tacoma Rainiers Pacific Coast League Dan Rohn
AA San Antonio Missions Texas League Dave Brundage
A Inland Empire 66ers California League Steve Roadcap
A Wisconsin Timber Rattlers Midwest League Daren Brown
A-Short Season Everett AquaSox Northwest League Pedro Grifol
Rookie AZL Mariners Arizona League Scott Steinmann

[11]

Major League Baseball Draft

2004 Seattle Mariners draft picks
Information
Owner Nintendo of America
General Manager(s) Bill Bavasi
Manager(s) Bob Melvin
First pick Matt Tuiasosopo
Draft positionsN/A
Number of selections48
Links
Results Baseball-Reference
Official Site The Official Site of the Seattle Mariners
Years 2003 • 2004 • 2005

The following is a list of 2004 Seattle Mariners draft picks. The Mariners took part in the June regular draft, also known as the Rule 4 draft. The Mariners made 48 selections in the 2004 draft, the first being shortstop Matt Tuiasosopo in the third round. In all, the Mariners selected 18 pitchers, 13 outfielders, 6 catchers, 6 shortstops, 3 first basemen, 1 third baseman, and 1 second baseman.

Draft

Matt Tuiasosopo (center) was the Mariners' first selection in the 2004 draft. Matt Tuiasosopo 2007.jpg
Matt Tuiasosopo (center) was the Mariners' first selection in the 2004 draft.
Rob Johnson was selected by the Mariners in the fourth round. 001U2383 Rob Johnson (cropped).jpg
Rob Johnson was selected by the Mariners in the fourth round.
In the fifth round the Mariners selected Mark Lowe. AAAA3646 Mark Lowe.jpg
In the fifth round the Mariners selected Mark Lowe.
Marshall Hubbard was selected by the Mariners in the eight round. Thomas Hubbard.jpg
Marshall Hubbard was selected by the Mariners in the eight round.
With the 333rd pick in the 2004 draft, the Mariners selected Michael Saunders. Michael Saunders 2006.jpg
With the 333rd pick in the 2004 draft, the Mariners selected Michael Saunders.
J. P. Arencibia was the 513th pick in the 2004 draft. Jparencibia1.JPG
J. P. Arencibia was the 513th pick in the 2004 draft.

Key

Round (Pick)Indicates the round and pick the player was drafted
PositionIndicates the secondary/collegiate position at which the player was drafted, rather than the professional position the player may have gone on to play
BoldIndicates the player signed with the Mariners
ItalicsIndicates the player did not sign with the Mariners
*Indicates the player made an appearance in Major League Baseball

Table

Round (Pick)NamePositionSchoolRef.
3 (93) Matt Tuiasosopo Shortstop Woodinville High School [12]
4 (123) Rob Johnson Catcher University of Houston [13]
5 (153) Mark Lowe Right-handed pitcher University of Texas at Arlington [14]
6 (183)Jermaine Brock Outfielder Ottawa Hills High School [15]
7 (213) Sebastien Boucher Outfielder Bethune–Cookman University [16]
8 (243) Marshall Hubbard First baseman University of North Carolina at Asheville [17]
9 (273)Jeffrey Dominguez Shortstop Puerto Rico Baseball Academy and High School [18]
10 (303)Eric Carter Right-handed pitcher Delaware State University [19]
11 (333) Michael Saunders Outfielder Lambrick Park Secondary School [20]
12 (363)Steven Uhlmansiek Left-handed pitcher Wichita State University [21]
13 (393)Kristopher Kasarjian Outfielder Los Angeles Pierce College [22]
14 (423)Brent Johnson Outfielder University of Nevada, Las Vegas [23]
15 (453)Brent Thomas Outfielder Bellevue Community College [24]
16 (483)Chad Fillinger Right-handed pitcher Santa Clara University [25]
17 (513) J. P. Arencibia Catcher Westminster Christian School [24]
18 (543)Jack Arroyo Second baseman California State University, San Bernardino [24]
19 (573)Brandon Green Shortstop Wichita State University [24]
20 (603)Brian Chavez Shortstop Quartz Hill High School [24]
21 (633)Mumba Rivera Right-handed pitcher Bethune–Cookman University [26]
22 (663)David Hall Outfielder San Diego State University [27]
23 (693)John Summerhayes First baseman Stanford University [28]
24 (723)Gregory Slee Catcher Huntington College [29]
25 (753)Jonathan Jacobitz Catcher University of San Francisco [30]
26 (783)Zachary Ashwood Left-handed pitcher The Colony High School [31]
27 (813)Aaron Trolia Right-handed pitcher Washington State University [24]
28 (843)Adam Brandt Left-handed pitcher Otterbein College [32]
29 (873)Michael Ciccotelli Left-handed pitcher Villanova University [33]
30 (903)Rollie Gibson Left-handed pitcher Fresno City College [34]
31 (933)Chad Rothford First baseman Fresno City College [35]
32 (963)Donald Clement Right-handed pitcher Colorado State University–Pueblo [36]
33 (993)Marquise Liverpool Outfielder Don Bosco Preparatory High School [37]
34 (1023)Matthew Welker Right-handed pitcher Woodinville High School [24]
35 (1053)Brandon Javis Shortstop Cross Creek High School [24]
36 (1083) Nick Hagadone Left-handed pitcher Sumner High School [24]
37 (1113) James Russell Left-handed pitcher Colleyville Heritage High School [38]
38 (1143)Harold Williams Left-handed pitcher Mt. San Jacinto College [39]
39 (1173)Jacob Opitz Shortstop Heritage High School [40]
40 (1203)Michael Schilling Right-handed pitcher Fresno City College [41]
41 (1233)Garrett Parcell Right-handed pitcher Norco High School [42]
42 (1262)Erwin Jacobo Third baseman Braddock High School [43]
43 (1291)Luis Coste Outfielder Puerto Rico Baseball Academy and High School [24]
44 (1320)Felix Martinez Outfielder Broward College [24]
45 (1349)Gordon Lynah Outfielder Spartanburg Methodist College [24]
46 (1379)Daniel Martin Outfielder Indian River Community College [24]
47 (1407)Andrew Mcdonald Catcher Sahuaro High School [24]
48 (1435)Zachary Walden Catcher Stockbridge High School [24]
49 (1463)Andrew Reichard Right-handed pitcher Seminole Community College [24]
50 (1491)Leighton Autrey Outfielder Navarro College [24]

Related Research Articles

Ichiro Suzuki Japanese baseball player

Ichiro Suzuki, often referred to mononymously as Ichiro, is a Japanese former professional baseball outfielder who played 28 seasons combined in top-level professional leagues. He spent the bulk of his career with two teams: nine seasons with the Orix Blue Wave of Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) in Japan, where he began his career, and 14 with the Seattle Mariners of Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States. After playing the first 12 years of his MLB career for the Mariners, Ichiro played two and a half seasons with the New York Yankees before signing with the Miami Marlins. He played three seasons with the Marlins before returning to the Mariners in 2018.

John Olerud American baseball player

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George Sisler American baseball player and coach

George Harold Sisler, nicknamed "Gorgeous George", was an American professional baseball first baseman and player-manager. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators and Boston Braves. He managed the Browns from 1924 through 1926.

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References

1st Half: Seattle Mariners Game Log on ESPN.com
2nd Half: Seattle Mariners Game Log on ESPN.com
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