2005 American League Division Series

Last updated

2005 American League Division Series
2005ALDS.jpg
Teams
Team (Wins)ManagerSeason
Chicago White Sox (3) Ozzie Guillén 99–63, .611, GA: 6
Boston Red Sox (0) Terry Francona 95–67, .586, GA: 0
DatesOctober 4 – 7
Television ESPN (Games 1–2)
ESPN2 (Game 3)
TV announcers Chris Berman, Rick Sutcliffe, Mike Piazza
Radio ESPN
Radio announcers Jon Sciambi, Buck Martinez
Umpires John Hirschbeck, Bill Miller, Mark Wegner, Mark Carlson (Game 1), Dale Scott (Games 2-3), Mike Everitt, Dan Iassogna
Teams
Team (Wins)ManagerSeason
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (3) Mike Scioscia 95–67, .586, GA: 7
New York Yankees (2) Joe Torre 95–67, .586, GA: 0
DatesOctober 4 – 10
Television Fox (Games 1, 4–5)
ESPN (Games 2–3)
TV announcers Joe Buck, Tim McCarver (Games 1, 5)
Jon Miller, Joe Morgan (Games 2–3)
Thom Brennaman, Tim McCarver (Game 4)
Radio ESPN
Radio announcers Dan Shulman, Dave Campbell
Umpires Gary Darling, Jerry Meals, Derryl Cousins, Alfonso Márquez, Joe West, Jim Reynolds
  2004 ALDS 2006  
2005 ALCS                 2005 World Series

The 2005 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2005 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 4, and ended on Monday, October 10, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

In Major League Baseball, the American League Division Series (ALDS) determines which two teams from the American League will advance to the American League Championship Series. The Division Series consists of two best-of-five series, featuring the three division winners and the winner of the wild-card play-off.

Contents

The 2005 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 105th season. They finished with a 99–63 record in the regular season and first place in the American League Central division by six games over the Cleveland Indians. In the playoffs, they won the American League Division Series 3–0 over the defending world champion Boston Red Sox, the American League Championship Series 4–1 over the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, and the World Series 4–0 over the Houston Astros, ending an 88-year championship drought.

2005 Boston Red Sox season Major League Baseball season

The 2005 Boston Red Sox season was the 105th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 95 wins and 67 losses, the same record as the New York Yankees. The Yankees were deemed the division winner, due to their 10–9 head-to-head record against the Red Sox during the regular season. The Red Sox qualified for the postseason as the AL wild card, but were swept by the American League Central champion Chicago White Sox in the ALDS.

The New York Yankees' 2005 season was the 103rd season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 95-67 finishing with the same record as the Boston Red Sox but winning the division due to a head-to-head advantage over Boston. New York was managed by Joe Torre. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the playoffs, they lost in the ALDS in 5 games to the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. It was also their eleventh year going to the playoffs in a row.

The higher seed (#1 is the highest) had the home field advantage.

NOTE: The Yankees were designated the Eastern Division champions due to winning the season series 10–9 against the Red Sox. The Angels received home field advantage rather than the Yankees due to their winning the season series 6–4 against New York.

2005 was the first year since 2001 that the Minnesota Twins had not participated in the ALDS. Other than the White Sox' victory in the AL Central, the participants were identical to those of the previous year.

2001 American League Division Series

The 2001 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2001 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 9, and ended on Monday, October 15, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

Minnesota Twins Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States

The Minnesota Twins is an American professional baseball team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The team competes in the Central division of the American League (AL), and is named after the Twin Cities area comprising Minneapolis and St. Paul.

The two victorious teams went on to meet in the AL Championship Series (ALCS). The victorious White Sox advanced to defeat the National League champion Houston Astros and win the 2005 World Series.

2005 American League Championship Series

The 2005 American League Championship Series (ALCS), the second round of the 2005 American League playoffs, which determined the 2005 American League champion, matched the Central Division champion Chicago White Sox against the West Division champion Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. The White Sox, by virtue of having the best record in the AL during the 2005 season, had the home-field advantage. The White Sox won the series four games to one to become the American League champions, and faced the Houston Astros in the 2005 World Series, in which the White Sox swept the Astros in four games to win their first World Series championship in 88 years; as a result of the 2005 All-Star Game played in Detroit, Michigan at Comerica Park on July 12, the White Sox had home-field advantage in the World Series. The series was notable both for a controversial call in Game 2 of the series, and the outstanding pitching and durability of Chicago's starting rotation, pitching four consecutive complete games; the ​ 23 of an inning Neal Cotts pitched in the first game was the only work the White Sox bullpen saw the entire series.

2005 National League Championship Series

The 2005 National League Championship Series (NLCS), the second round of the 2005 National League playoffs, matched the Central Division champion and defending league champion St. Louis Cardinals against the wild card qualifier Houston Astros, a rematch of the 2004 NLCS. The Cardinals, by virtue of having the best record in the NL during the 2005 season, had the home-field advantage. The Astros won the series four games to two, and became the National League champions; they faced the American League champion Chicago White Sox in the 2005 World Series, where the Astros lost to the White Sox in a sweep in four games.

The Houston Astros' 2005 season was a season in which the Houston Astros qualified for the postseason for the second consecutive season. The Astros overcame a sluggish 15–30 start to claim the wild card playoff spot, and would go on to win the National League pennant to advance to the World Series for the first time in franchise history. It was longtime Astros first baseman Jeff Bagwell's final season and first World Series appearance.

Matchups

Chicago White Sox vs. Boston Red Sox

Chicago won the series, 3–0.

GameDateScoreLocationTimeAttendance 
1October 4Boston Red Sox – 2, Chicago White Sox – 14 U.S. Cellular Field 2:5640,717 [1]  
2October 5Boston Red Sox – 4, Chicago White Sox – 5U.S. Cellular Field2:2940,799 [2]  
3October 7Chicago White Sox – 5, Boston Red Sox – 3 Fenway Park 3:2835,496 [3]

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim vs. New York Yankees

Los Angeles won the series, 3–2.

GameDateScoreLocationTimeAttendance 
1October 4New York Yankees – 4, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 2 Angel Stadium of Anaheim 2:5945,142 [4]  
2October 5New York Yankees – 3, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 5Angel Stadium of Anaheim3:0545,150 [5]  
3October 7Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 11, New York Yankees – 7 Yankee Stadium (I) 4:0056,277 [6]  
4October 9†Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 2, New York Yankees – 3Yankee Stadium (I)3:1356,226 [7]  
5October 10New York Yankees – 3, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 5Angel Stadium of Anaheim3:2945,133 [8]

†: Game was postponed due to rain on October 8

Chicago vs. Boston

Game 1, October 4

U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago, Illinois

Team123456789 R H E
Boston000200000290
Chicago50120402X14111
WP: José Contreras (1–0)   LP: Matt Clement (0–1)
Home runs:
BOS: None
CWS: A. J. Pierzynski 2 (2), Paul Konerko (1), Juan Uribe (1), Scott Podsednik (1)

The White Sox rocked Red Sox starter Matt Clement for five runs in the first inning. Clement hit Scott Podsednik to lead off the game. Podsednik moved to second on a groundout, then after another hit-by-pitch, stole third and scored on Paul Konerko's force out at second. Carl Everett singled before Konerko scored on Aaron Rowand's RBI single, then A.J. Pierzynski's three-run home run made it 5–0 Chicago. Konerko's home run in the third made it 6–0 White Sox. The Red Sox scored their only runs of the game in the fourth when Trot Nixon and Jason Varitek hit back-to-back singles aided by an error to put them on third and second, respectively. Jose Contreras's wild pitch scored Nixon, then Kevin Millar's double scored Varitek. Contreras went 7 23 innings, giving up eight hits. In the bottom of the fourth, Juan Uribe's two-run home run extended Chicago's lead to 8–2 and forced Clement out of the game. Geremi Gonzalez allowed a leadoff walk and subsequent hit-by-pitch in the sixth. One out later, a single by Uribe scored a run, then Scott Podsednik's three-run home run made it 12–2 Chicago. Podsednik had gone homerless in the regular season and this was his first home run since September 30, 2004. In the eighth, Pierzynski's second home run of the game off of Bronson Arroyo made it 13–2 Chicago. After two walks, Willie Harris's RBI single capped the scoring at 14–2 Chicago. Cliff Politte pitched a scoreless ninth to give the White Sox a 1–0 series lead. Boston's postseason winning streak was snapped at eight games with this loss. This was the White Sox' first postseason home win since Game 1 of the 1959 World Series.

Matthew Paul Clement is a former Major League Baseball starting pitcher. Clement played for the San Diego Padres (1998–2000), Florida Marlins (2001), Chicago Cubs (2002–2004) and Boston Red Sox (2005–2006). While on the Red Sox active roster, he was injured all of the 2007 season. He batted and threw right-handed.

Scott Podsednik American baseball player

Scott Eric Podsednik is an American former professional baseball outfielder in Major League Baseball (MLB). Best known for his baserunning, Podsednik led the major leagues in stolen bases in 2004 with 70, in times caught stealing in 2005 with 23, and the American League in times caught stealing in 2006 with 19. He won the World Series with the 2005 Chicago White Sox, hitting a walk-off home run in Game 2.

Paul Konerko American baseball player

Paul Henry Konerko is an American former professional baseball first baseman who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Cincinnati Reds and, for most of his career, the Chicago White Sox. Konerko helped the White Sox win the 2005 World Series over the Houston Astros, the franchise's first since 1917. From 2006 to 2014 he served as the White Sox captain.

Game 2, October 5

U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago, Illinois

Team123456789 R H E
Boston202000000491
Chicago00005000X590
WP: Mark Buehrle (1–0)   LP: David Wells (0–1)   Sv: Bobby Jenks (1)
Home runs:
BOS: None
CWS: Tadahito Iguchi (1)

The Red Sox struck first in Game 2 on Manny Ramirez's two-run single off of Mark Buehrle with runners on second and third. In the fourth, they loaded the bases on a single, double and intentional walk before Jason Varitek's single and Trot Nixon's groundout scored a run each. David Wells (6 23 innings, two earned runs, seven hits) looked tough, giving up only two hits in the first four innings. But in the White Sox half of the fifth, the White Sox struck pay-dirt. Carl Everett hit a leadoff single, then scored on Aaron Rowand's double. One out later, Rowand scored on Joe Crede's single. Boston second baseman's Tony Graffanino error on Juan Uribe's ground ball put two runners on and one out later, Tadahito Iguchi's three-run home run put the White Sox up 5–4, those three runs unearned. Buehrle (seven innings, four earned runs, eight hits) earned the win with the save going to Bobby Jenks.

Manny Ramirez Dominican-American baseball player

Manuel Arístides Ramírez Onelcida is a Dominican-American former professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for parts of 19 seasons. He played with the Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, Los Angeles Dodgers, Chicago White Sox, and Tampa Bay Rays before playing one season in the Chinese Professional Baseball League. Ramirez is recognized for having great batting skill and power. He was a nine-time Silver Slugger and was one of 27 players to hit 500 career home runs. His 21 grand slams are third all-time, and his 29 postseason home runs are the most in MLB history. He appeared in 12 All-Star Games, with a streak of eleven consecutive games beginning in 1998 that included every season that he played with the Red Sox.

Mark Buehrle American baseball player

Mark Alan Buehrle is an American former professional baseball pitcher. He began his Major League Baseball (MLB) career with the Chicago White Sox and started the opening game every season from 2002 to 2006 and again from 2008 to 2011. He also pitched for the Miami Marlins and Toronto Blue Jays. Buehrle pitched 200 innings in 14 consecutive seasons (2001–2014), tying Hall-of-Famers Greg Maddux, Phil Niekro, and Christy Mathewson. He recorded at least ten wins in 15 straight seasons.

Jason Varitek American baseball player

Jason Andrew Varitek, nicknamed Tek, is a retired American baseball catcher. After being traded as a minor league prospect by the Seattle Mariners, Varitek played his entire career in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Boston Red Sox, for whom he now works as a special assistant. A three-time All-Star and Gold Glove Award winner at catcher, as well as a Silver Slugger Award winner, Varitek was part of both the 2004 World Series and 2007 World Series Championship teams, and was viewed widely as one of the team's leaders. In December 2004 he was named the captain of the Red Sox, only their fourth captain since 1923. He was a switch-hitter.

Game 3, October 7

Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts

Team123456789 R H E
Chicago002002001580
Boston000201000371
WP: Freddy García (1–0)   LP: Tim Wakefield (0–1)   Sv: Bobby Jenks (2)
Home runs:
CWS: Paul Konerko (2)
BOS: David Ortiz (1), Manny Ramírez 2 (2)

For the first time since 1993, the White Sox secured their place in the ALCS by beating the Red Sox in Game 3. Freddy García (five innings, five hits, three earned runs) faced Tim Wakefield (5 13 innings, six hits, four runs). The White Sox struck first, when Juan Uribe doubled with two outs, then Scott Podsednik's double and Tadahito Iguchi's single scored a run each in the third. Back-to-back home runs by David Ortiz and Manny Ramirez leading off the fourth tied the game. In the sixth, Paul Konerko, with Jermaine Dye on base, hit a home run to put the White Sox in the lead for good. Ramirez's second home run of the game in the bottom of the inning cut the lead to 4–3, then Damaso Marte relieved Garcia and allowed a single and two walks to load the bases with no outs. El Duque, Orlando Hernández, came in relief and induced Jason Varitek to foul out, Tony Graffanino to pop out to short, and Johnny Damon to strike out to end the inning without giving up another run. He proceeded to pitch three total innings, giving up one hit. The White Sox got an insurance run in the ninth off of Mike Timlin when A.J. Pierzynski hit a leadoff double, moved to third on a groundout and scored on Juan Uribe's fielder's choice. Bobby Jenks retired the Red Sox in order in the bottom half, earning his second save of the series. This was the White Sox's first postseason series win since the 1917 World Series.

Composite line score

2005 ALDS (3–0): Chicago White Sox over Boston Red Sox

Team123456789 R H E
Chicago White Sox 50325602124281
Boston Red Sox 2024010009252
Total attendance: 117,012  Average attendance: 39,004

Los Angeles vs. New York

Game 1, October 4

Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

Team123456789 R H E
New York310000000490
Los Angeles000000101270
WP: Mike Mussina (1–0)   LP: Bartolo Colón (0–1)   Sv: Mariano Rivera (1)
Home runs:
NYY: None
LAA: Bengie Molina (1)

The Yankees were able to get to AL Cy Young Award winner Bartolo Colón early. Three two-out singles loaded the bases in the top of the first, then rookie Robinson Canó lifted a line drive over the reaching hand of left fielder Garret Anderson. The double would clear the bases, giving the Yankees a 3–0 lead. Next inning, Derek Jeter singled with two outs, moved to second on a hit-by-pitch, and scored on Jason Giambi's single. Though Colón and Scot Shields held the Yankees scoreless for the rest of the game, starter Mike Mussina pitched 5 23 innings. Bengie Molina's home run in the seventh off of Tanyon Sturtze put the Angels on the board. In the ninth, Mariano Rivera walked Vladimir Guerrero with one out. After stealing second, Guerrero scored on Darin Erstad's single, but Rivera retired the next two batters to give the Yankees a 1–0 series lead.

Game 2, October 5

Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

Team123456789 R H E
New York010010001363
Los Angeles00001121X570
WP: Kelvim Escobar (1–0)   LP: Chien-Ming Wang (0–1)   Sv: Francisco Rodríguez (1)
Home runs:
NYY: Jorge Posada (1)
LAA: Juan Rivera (1), Bengie Molina (2)

In Game 2, the starters were John Lackey for the Angels and Chien-Ming Wang for the Yankees. The Yankees scored the first run of the game in the second when Hideki Matsui and Robinson Canó hit back-to-back doubles. They made it 2–0 in the fifth after Alex Rodríguez walked, moved to third on Jason Giambi's double and scored on Gary Sheffield's ground out. The Angels got on the board in the bottom of that inning on Juan Rivera's home run. In the sixth, Alex Rodríguez's error allowed Orlando Cabrera to make it to first base. He would move to second on Vladimir Guerrero's ground out and score on Bengie Molina's single, tying the game at two. In the next inning, Wang's throwing error would allow Jeff DaVanon and Steve Finley to reach third and second, respectively. Both scored on Cabrera's single, giving the Angels a 4–2 lead. In the eighth, Molina's home run off of Al Leiter extended the Angels lead to three. In the ninth, Jorge Posada's home run off of Francisco Rodriguez cut the lead back to two, but K. Rod retired the next three batters to end the game and tie the series heading to New York.

Game 3, October 7

Yankee Stadium (I) in the Bronx, New York

Team123456789 R H E
Los Angeles30200222011191
New York0004200107122
WP: Scot Shields (1–0)   LP: Aaron Small (0–1)
Home runs:
LAA: Garret Anderson (1), Bengie Molina (3)
NYY: Hideki Matsui (1), Derek Jeter (1)

In Game 3, it was Randy Johnson pitching for the Yankees while Paul Byrd pitched for the Angels. Johnson ran into trouble early, giving up a three-run home run to Garret Anderson in the first after back-to-back two-out singles and a two-run homer to Bengie Molina in the third to give the Angels a 5–0 lead. After allowing a double and single in the fourth without getting an out, Johnson was taken out of the game while being booed. The Yankees rallied in the bottom of the inning. First, Hideki Matsui homered to put the Yanks on the board 5–1. Then Robinson Canó and Bernie Williams hit back to back singles and moved one base each on a groundout. Canó scored on Jorge Posada's groundout and Williams on Derek Jeter's single. After a walk, Brendan Donnelly relieved Byrd and Jason Giambi's single scored Jeter and cut the Angels' lead to one. In the next inning, after Matsui walked, Canó doubled to left and a throwing error by Cabrera allowed Matsui to score and Canó to go to third. Scot Shields relieved Donnelly and gave up a sacrifice fly to Bernie Williams that scored Canó, giving the Yankees a 6–5 lead, but in the sixth Reliever Aaron Small allowed a one-out double to Juan Rivera before Darin Erstad's RBI single tied the game. After a strikeout and single, Chone Figgins's RBI single put the Angels back in front 7–6. Tom Gordon allowed a leadoff single and subsequent hit-by-pitch before Garret Anderson's RBI single made it 8–6 Angels. Two errors loaded the bases before Steve Finley's RBI groundout off of Al Leiter made it 9–6 Angels. In the eighth, Leiter allowed a leadoff triple, then after a one-out intentional walk, back-to-back RBI singles by José Molina and Anderson off of Scott Proctor made it 11–6 Angels. The Yankees got only one more run on Jeter's leadoff home run in the eighth off of Kelvim Escobar as the Angels' 11–7 win put them one win away from the ALCS.

Game 4, October 9

Yankee Stadium (I) in the Bronx, New York

Team123456789 R H E
Los Angeles000002000240
New York00000120X341
WP: Al Leiter (1–0)   LP: Scot Shields (1–1)   Sv: Mariano Rivera (2)

The Angels struck first in Game 4, scoring two runs in the top of the sixth on two doubles by Chone Figgins and Orlando Cabrera off Yankees starting pitcher Shawn Chacón after a leadoff walk. The Yankees cut the lead to one in the bottom of the inning when Alex Rodriguez walked, moved to second on a groundout and scored on Gary Sheffield's single off Angels starting pitcher John Lackey. In the bottom of the next inning, Robinson Canó singled and Jorge Posada walked off of Scot Shields. They would score on singles from Rubén Sierra and Derek Jeter. Al Leiter earned the win in relief and Mariano Rivera pitched a perfect eighth and ninth as the Yankees won 3–2 to force a Game 5 back in Anaheim.

Game 5, October 10

Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

Team123456789 R H E
New York0200001003110
Los Angeles03200000X590
WP: Ervin Santana (1–0)   LP: Mike Mussina (1–1)   Sv: Francisco Rodríguez (2)
Home runs:
NYY: Derek Jeter (2)
LAA: Garret Anderson (2)

Game 5 had the same starting pitchers as in Game 1, Bartolo Colón for the Angels and Mike Mussina for the Yankees. Colón left the game in the second inning due to a hand injury after giving up two hits in the first and was relieved by Ervin Santana, who walked Robinson Canó (who was caught out stealing), Bernie Williams, and Jorge Posada. Williams scored on Bubba Crosby's single and Posada on Derek Jeter's sacrifice fly as the Yankees took an early 2–0 lead. Mussina, however, after pitching a perfect first, allowed a leadoff home run to Garret Anderson in the second to cut the lead to one. Then, Bengie Molina singled to center. After getting two outs, Mussina walked Steve Finley before Adam Kennedy hit the ball to right center. Bubba Crosby and Gary Sheffield collided on the outfield wall trying to catch it, allowing Molina and Finley to score to give the Angels a 3–2 lead. Next inning, Mussina allowed back-to-back leadoff singles to put runners on first and third, then Anderson's sacrifice fly scored a run. After a single again put runners on first and third, Darin Erstad's RBI single extended the Angels' lead to 5–2. Mussina was pulled from the game one out later in his shortest postseason start ever. Randy Johnson, making his first postseason relief appearance since Game 7 of the 2001 World Series with the Arizona Diamondbacks against the Yankees, kept the Angels scoreless for the rest of the game, allowing just three hits. Jeter's home run in the seventh off Santana cut the lead to two. Jeter opened the ninth with a single off closer Francisco Rodríguez, but Alex Rodriguez grounded into a double play. Jason Giambi and Gary Sheffield both hit singles afterward, but Hideki Matsui grounded out to first to end the game. The Angels would face the Chicago White Sox in the ALCS.

Composite line score

2005 ALDS (3–2): Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim over New York Yankees

Team123456789 R H E
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 33401553125461
New York Yankees 34043131120426
Total attendance: 247,928  Average attendance: 49,586

Notes

  1. "2005 ALDS - Boston Red Sox vs. Chicago White Sox - Game 1". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  2. "2005 ALDS - Boston Red Sox vs. Chicago White Sox - Game 2". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. "2005 ALDS - Chicago White Sox vs. Boston Red Sox - Game 3". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. "2005 ALDS - New York Yankees vs. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim - Game 1". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. "2005 ALDS - New York Yankees vs. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim - Game 2". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  6. "2005 ALDS - Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim vs. New York Yankees - Game 3". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  7. "2005 ALDS - Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim vs. New York Yankees - Game 4". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  8. "2005 ALDS - New York Yankees vs. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim - Game 5". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.

Related Research Articles

The 1986 American League Championship Series was a back-and-forth battle between the Boston Red Sox and the California Angels for the right to advance to the 1986 World Series to face the winner of the 1986 National League Championship Series. The Red Sox came in with a 95–66 record and the AL East division title, while the Angels went 92–70 during the regular season to win the AL West.

2004 American League Championship Series

The 2004 American League Championship Series was the Major League Baseball playoff series to decide the American League champion for the 2004 season, and the right to play in the 2004 World Series. A rematch of the 2003 American League Championship Series, it was played between the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees, at Fenway Park and the original Yankee Stadium, from October 12 to 20, 2004. The Red Sox became the first team in MLB history to come back from a 3–0 deficit to win a seven-game series. The Red Sox, who had won the AL wild card, defeated the Anaheim Angels in the American League Division Series to reach the ALCS, while the Yankees, who had won the AL East with the best record in the AL, defeated the Minnesota Twins.

2004 American League Division Series

The 2004 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2004 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 5, and ended on Saturday, October 9, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

2003 American League Division Series

The 2003 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2003 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, September 30, and ended on Monday, October 6, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

2002 American League Division Series

The 2002 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2002 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 1, and ended on Sunday, October 6, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

2000 American League Division Series

The 2000 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2000 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 3, and ended on Sunday, October 8, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

1996 American League Championship Series

The 1996 American League Championship Series (ALCS), the second round of the 1996 American League playoffs, matched the East Division champion New York Yankees against the Wild Card team, the Baltimore Orioles. The Yankees had the home field advantage in the series because they had won their division and the Orioles were the Wild Card team.

The 2006 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2006 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 3, and ended on Saturday, October 7, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

1999 American League Division Series

The 1999 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 1999 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 5, and ended on Monday, October 11, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams, which were identical to those qualifying in 1998, were:

1999 American League Championship Series

The 1999 American League Championship Series (ALCS) was a matchup between the East Division Champion New York Yankees (98–64) and the Wild Card Boston Red Sox (94–68). The Yankees had advanced to the Series after sweeping the West Division Champion Texas Rangers in the AL Division Series for the second consecutive year, and the Red Sox advanced by beating the Central Division Champion Cleveland Indians three games to two. The Yankees won the series, 4-1. They won their 36th American League pennant and went on to win the World Series against the Atlanta Braves.

2002 American League Championship Series

The 2002 American League Championship Series (ALCS) was a matchup between the Wild Card Anaheim Angels and the Central Division Champion Minnesota Twins. The Angels advanced to the Series after dethroning the reigning four-time AL Champion New York Yankees in the 2002 American League Division Series three games to one. The Twins made their way into the Series after beating the Athletics three games to two. The Angels won the Series four games to one and went on to defeat the San Francisco Giants in the 2002 World Series to win their first World Series championship.

1997 American League Division Series

The 1997 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 1997 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, September 30, and ended on Monday, October 6, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

1996 American League Division Series

The 1996 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 1996 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 1, and ended on Saturday, October 5, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

2007 American League Division Series

The 2007 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2007 American League playoffs, began on Wednesday, October 3 and ended on Monday, October 8. The 2007 AL Division Series consisted of three AL division champions and one wild card team, participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

2008 American League Championship Series

The 2008 American League Championship Series (ALCS), the second round of the 2008 American League playoffs, was a best-of-seven series matching the two winners of the American League Division Series. The AL East Division champion Tampa Bay Rays, who had defeated the Chicago White Sox in the ALDS, were paired with the wild-card and defending world champion Boston Red Sox, who had defeated the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, in the ALDS. Tampa Bay held the home field advantage.

2008 American League Division Series

The 2008 American League Division Series (ALDS), the first round of the 2008 American League playoffs, consisted of two best-of-five series. They were:

2009 American League Championship Series

The 2009 American League Championship Series (ALCS), the second round of the 2009 American League playoffs, was a best-of-seven game series matching the two winners of the 2009 American League Division Series. The AL East Division champions, the New York Yankees, defeated the AL West Division champions, the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, four games to two, to advance to the 2009 World Series, their first since 2003. This was the third time that these two teams faced each other in the playoffs. They met in the 2002 ALDS and 2005 ALDS with the Angels winning both series by 3–1 and 3–2. New York, with a better regular-season record than Los Angeles, held home-field advantage. The series, the 39th in league history, began on October 16 and ended on October 25. Fox Sports carried all games with Joe Buck and Tim McCarver in the broadcast booth. Starting with the 2009 season, weeknight games began 40 minutes earlier as suggested by Commissioner Bud Selig.

2011 American League Division Series

The 2011 American League Division Series were two best-of-five playoffs comprising the opening round of the Major League Baseball postseason, played to determine the participating teams in the 2011 American League Championship Series. Three divisional winners and a fourth team—a wild card—played in two series. TBS televised all games but the Game 2's of both series in the United States. The Game 2's of both series were aired on TNT due to schedule conflicts with other ALDS games or the NLDS. The regular season finished on September 28, with the ALDS beginning September 30. Game 5 of the Yankees–Tigers series was played on October 6.