2007 FIFA Women's World Cup Final

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2007 FIFA Women's World Cup Final
Event 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup
Date30 September 2007
Venue Hongkou Football Stadium, Shanghai
Player of the Match Nadine Angerer
Referee Tammy Ogston (Australia)
Attendance31,000
2003
2011

The final of the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup was played between Germany and Brazil. The match took place at the Hongkou Football Stadium, in Shanghai, China, on 30 September 2007. [1]

2007 FIFA Womens World Cup 2007 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fifth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was an international association football competition for women held in China from 10 to 30 September 2007. Originally, China was to host the 2003 edition, but the outbreak of SARS in that country forced that event to be moved to the United States. FIFA immediately granted the 2007 event to China, which meant that no new host nation was chosen competitively until the voting was held for the 2011 Women's World Cup.

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

The Brazil women's national football team played their first game on 22 July 1986 against the United States, losing 2–1.

Contents

Finalists

The match was between Germany, who had won the previous Women's World Cup final and Brazil, who had never won a major world title, or indeed even reached the finals of a Women's World Cup. This was the first time in the history of the Women's World Cup that a European and South American had met each other in the final. Germany had not conceded a single goal in the whole competition whereas Brazil were free-scoring. Led by striker Marta, who had scored 7 goals, Brazil had scored seventeen goals in their route to the final, including four against title-rivals United States in the semi-finals. It was considered as "the rematch of the 2002 FIFA World Cup", except it was the men's teams.

Marta (footballer) Brazilian association football player

Marta Vieira da Silva, commonly known as Marta, is a Brazilian footballer who plays for the Orlando Pride in the National Women's Soccer League and the Brazil national team as a forward. With 15 goals, she holds the record for most goals scored at FIFA Women's World Cup tournaments, ahead of Birgit Prinz and Abby Wambach, both with 14 goals.

United States womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States Women's National Soccer Team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning three Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic women's gold medals, eight CONCACAF Gold Cup wins, and ten Algarve Cups. It medaled in every single World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF.

2002 FIFA World Cup 2002 edition of the FIFA World Cup

The 2002 FIFA World Cup was the 17th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial world championship for men's national football teams organized by FIFA. It was held from 31 May to 30 June 2002 at sites in South Korea and Japan, with its final match hosted by Japan at International Stadium in Yokohama.

Route to the final

Germany began their campaign to retain the trophy with the most lopsided World Cup win in history, Argentina lost 11–0.

The Argentina women's national football team represents Argentina in international women's football. Since there is no professional league in Argentina, almost all its members were amateur players until 1991.

GermanyRoundBrazil
OpponentResult Group stage OpponentResult
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 11–0Match 1Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 5–0
Flag of England.svg  England 0–0Match 2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 4–0
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 2–0Match 3Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1–0
TeamPtsPldWDLGFGAGD
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 73210130+13
Flag of England.svg  England 5312083+5
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 4311134−1
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 03003118−17
Final standing
TeamPtsPldWDLGFGAGD
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 93300100+10
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 6320156−1
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 33102440
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 0300309−9
OpponentResult Knockout stage OpponentResult
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 3–0 Quarterfinals Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 3–2
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3–0 Semifinals Flag of the United States.svg  United States 4–0

Match

Details

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg2–0Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Prinz Soccerball shade.svg 52'
Laudehr Soccerball shade.svg 86'
Report
Hongkou Stadium
Attendance: 31,000
Referee: Tammy Ogston (Australia)
Kit left arm white adidas stripes.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body wgermany2008.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm white adidas stripes.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts gerh06.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks 3 stripes black.png
Kit socks long.svg
Germany [2]
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body brazilhomefoot.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Brazil [2]
GK1 Nadine Angerer
RB2 Kerstin Stegemann
CB5 Annike Krahn
CB17 Ariane Hingst
LB6 Linda Bresonik Yellow card.svg 63'
CM14 Simone Laudehr
CM10 Renate Lingor
RW18 Kerstin Garefrekes Yellow card.svg 7'
AM9 Birgit Prinz (c)
LW7 Melanie Behringer Sub off.svg 74'
CF8 Sandra Smisek Sub off.svg 80'
Substitutions:
FW16 Martina Müller Sub on.svg 74'
MF19 Fatmire Bajramaj Sub on.svg 80'
Manager:
Silvia Neid
GER-BRA (women) 2007-09-30.svg
GK1 Andréia
SW5 Renata Costa
CB3 Aline (c)Sub off.svg 88'
CB4 Tânia Sub off.svg 81'
RM2 Elaine
CM8 Formiga
CM20 Ester Sub off.svg 63'
LM9 Maycon
AM7 Daniela Yellow card.svg 59'
CF11 Cristiane
CF10 Marta
Substitutions:
DF6 Rosana Sub on.svg 63'
MF18 Pretinha Sub on.svg 81'
FW15 Kátia Sub on.svg 88'
Manager:
Jorge Barcellos

Match Officials

  • Assistant referees:
  • Fourth official: Mayumi Oiwa (Japan)
Japan Football Association sports governing body

The Japan Football Association or Japan FA is the governing body responsible for the administration of football in Japan. It is responsible for the national team as well as club competitions.

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References

  1. "FIFA Women's World Cup - Sweden 1995". FIFA.com. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  2. 1 2 "Tactical Line-up – Germany-Brazil" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. p. 36. Retrieved 5 January 2018.