2007 FIFA Women's World Cup Final

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2007 FIFA Women's World Cup Final
Shang Hai Hong Kou Zu Qiu Chang Quan Mao .jpg
Hongkou Football Stadium in Shanghai hosted the final.
Event 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup
Date30 September 2007 (2007-09-30)
Venue Hongkou Football Stadium, Shanghai
Player of the Match Nadine Angerer (Germany)
Referee Tammy Ogston (Australia)
Attendance31,000 [1]
2003
2011

The 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup Final was an association football match which determined the winner of the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, contested by the women's national teams of the member associations of FIFA. It was played on 30 September 2007 and won by Germany, who defeated Brazil 2–0 in extra time. It was played at the Hongkou Football Stadium, in Shanghai, China. [2]

Contents

Finalists

The match was between Germany, who had won the previous Women's World Cup final and Brazil, who had never won a major world title, or indeed even reached the finals of a Women's World Cup. This was the first time in the history of the Women's World Cup that a European and South American had met each other in the final. Germany had not conceded a single goal in the whole competition whereas Brazil were free-scoring. Led by striker Marta, who had scored 7 goals, Brazil had scored seventeen goals in their route to the final, including four against title-rivals United States in the semi-finals. It was considered as "the rematch of the 2002 FIFA World Cup Final", except it was the men's teams.

Route to the final

Germany began their campaign to retain the trophy with the most lopsided World Cup win in history, Argentina lost 11–0.

GermanyRoundBrazil
OpponentResult Group stage OpponentResult
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 11–0Match 1Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 5–0
Flag of England.svg  England 0–0Match 2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 4–0
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 2–0Match 3Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1–0
PosTeamPldPts
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 37
2Flag of England.svg  England 35
3Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 34
4Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 30
Source: FIFA
Final standing
PosTeamPldPts
1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 39
2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR (H)36
3Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 33
4Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 30
Source: FIFA
(H) Host.
OpponentResult Knockout stage OpponentResult
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 3–0 Quarterfinals Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 3–2
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3–0 Semifinals Flag of the United States.svg  United States 4–0

Match

Details

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg2–0Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Report
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Kit right arm white adidas stripes.png
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Germany [3]
Kit left arm.svg
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Brazil [3]
GK1 Nadine Angerer
RB2 Kerstin Stegemann
CB5 Annike Krahn
CB17 Ariane Hingst
LB6 Linda Bresonik Yellow card.svg 63'
CM14 Simone Laudehr
CM10 Renate Lingor
RW18 Kerstin Garefrekes Yellow card.svg 7'
AM9 Birgit Prinz (c)
LW7 Melanie Behringer Sub off.svg 74'
CF8 Sandra Smisek Sub off.svg 80'
Substitutions:
FW16 Martina Müller Sub on.svg 74'
MF19 Fatmire Bajramaj Sub on.svg 80'
Manager:
Silvia Neid
GER-BRA (women) 2007-09-30.svg
GK1 Andréia
SW5 Renata Costa
CB3 Aline (c)Sub off.svg 88'
CB4 Tânia Sub off.svg 81'
RM2 Elaine
CM8 Formiga
CM20 Ester Sub off.svg 63'
LM9 Maycon
AM7 Daniela Yellow card.svg 59'
CF11 Cristiane
CF10 Marta
Substitutions:
DF6 Rosana Sub on.svg 63'
MF18 Pretinha Sub on.svg 81'
FW15 Kátia Sub on.svg 88'
Manager:
Jorge Barcellos

Match Officials

  • Assistant referees:
  • Fourth official: Mayumi Oiwa (Japan)

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Group A of the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup was one of four groups of nations competing at the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group's first round of matches began on September 10 and its last matches were played on September 17. Most matches were played at the Hongkou Stadium in Shanghai. Defending champions Germany topped the group, joined in the second round by England, the only team Germany failed to beat.

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England at the FIFA Womens World Cup

England have participated five times at the FIFA Women's World Cup: in 1995, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They have reached the quarter-finals three times and the semi-finals twice.

The New Zealand women's national football team has represented New Zealand at the FIFA Women's World Cup on five occasions in 1991, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They have never won a game or advanced beyond the group stage.

United States at the FIFA Womens World Cup

The United States women's national soccer team is the most successful women's national team in the history of the Women's World Cup, having won four titles, earning second-place once and third-place finishes three times. The United States is one of the countries besides Germany, Japan, and Norway to win a FIFA Women's World Cup. The United States are also the only team that has played the maximum number of matches possible in every tournament.

Japan at the FIFA Womens World Cup

The Japan women's national football team has represented Japan at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They are the only Asian team to have won the tournament and they are the only team that has won the trophy with a loss during the final tournament. They also were runners-up once.

The Germany women's national football team has represented Germany at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They have won the title twice and were runners-up once. They also reached the fourth place in 1991 and in 2015.

The Norway women's national football team has represented Norway at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They were runners up in 1991. They won the following tournament in 1995. They also reached the fourth place in 1999 and in 2007.

The China women's national football team has represented China at the FIFA Women's World Cup on seven occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2015 and 2019. They were runners-up once.

Brazil at the FIFA Womens World Cup

The Brazil women's national football team has represented Brazil at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They were runners-up once. They also reached the third place once.

Sweden at the FIFA Womens World Cup

The Sweden women's national football team has represented Sweden at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007,2011, 2015 and 2019. There were runners up once and three times bronze medalists: in 1991, in 2011 and in 2019

References

  1. 1 2 "FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007 – Report and Statistics" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 2007. pp. 67–73. Retrieved 7 January 2020.
  2. "FIFA Women's World Cup - Sweden 1995". FIFA.com. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  3. 1 2 "Tactical Line-up – Germany-Brazil" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. p. 36. Retrieved 5 January 2018.