2008 CONCACAF Women's Pre-Olympic Tournament

Last updated
2008 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Championship
Preolimpico Femenino CONCACAF
Tournament details
Host countryFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Dates2–12 April 2008
Teams 6  (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s) 1  (in 1 host city)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of the United States.svg  United States (2nd title)
Runners-upFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Tournament statistics
Matches played10
Goals scored37 (3.7 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of the United States.svg Natasha Kai
Flag of Mexico.svg Juana Lopez
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Melissa Tancredi
(4 goals each)
2004
2012

The 2008 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament [1] was the 2nd edition of the CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament, the quadrennial international football tournament organised by CONCACAF to determine which two women's national teams from the North, Central American and Caribbean region qualify for the Olympic football tournament. [1] A total of six teams played in the tournament. The top two teams of the tournament - United States and Canada - qualified for the 2008 Summer Olympics women's football tournament in Beijing, China as the CONCACAF representatives. [2]

The CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament is an international football (soccer) event in the North America, Central America and the Caribbean region, and is the qualification tournament for the Olympic Games.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Football at the Summer Olympics football competition

Football at the Summer Olympics, commonly known as football or soccer, has been included in every Summer Olympic Games as a men's competition sport, except 1896 and 1932. Women's football was added to the official program at the 1996 Atlanta Games.

Contents

Qualification

The six berths were allocated to the three regional zones as follows: [1]

North American Football Union

The North American Football Union (NAFU) is a regional grouping under CONCACAF of national football organizations in the North American Zone. The NAFU has no organizational structure. The statutes say "CONCACAF shall recognize ... The North American Football Union (NAFU)". The NAFU provide one of CONCACAF's representatives to the FIFA Executive Committee.

Canada womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Canada

The Canada women's national soccer team is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

Mexico womens national football team womens national association football team representing Mexico

The Mexico women's national football team represents Mexico on the international stage. The squad is governed by the Mexican Football Federation and competes within CONCACAF, the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football. Holding gold medals in the Central American and Caribbean Games and a silver medal in the Pan American Games, La Tri's senior squad is currently ranked 27 1 (12 July 2019). The team also boasts one silver and one bronze in the Women's World Cup, though these accomplishments are not officially recognized, as they took place prior to FIFA's recognition of the women's game. When it placed second in 1971, Mexico hosted the second edition of this unofficial tournament. In addition to its senior team, Mexico fields U-20 and U-17 squads as well, with the latter having reached the final during the 2018 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.

Regional qualification tournaments were held to determine the three teams joining Canada, Mexico, and the United States at the final tournament. [2]

Qualified teams

The following six teams qualified for the final tournament. [1]

TeamQualificationAppearancePrevious best performancesPrevious women's Olympic appearances
North American Zone (NAFU)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Automatic2ndThird Place (2004)0
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico Automatic2ndRunner-up (2004)1
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Automatic2ndWinner (2004)3
Central American Zone (UNCAF)
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica Group winner2ndFourth Place (2004)0
Caribbean Zone (CFU)
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago Final round winner2ndGroup stage (2004)0
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica Final round 3rd place1stN/A0

Venues

The sole venue was the

Estadio Olimpico Benito Juarez is a multi-purpose stadium in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, located just across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas. It is currently used mostly for football matches and concerts and is the home stadium of FC Juárez of the Ascenso MX. On May 12, 1981, the stadium was opened with a scoreless draw between the Mexico national football team and Atlético Madrid. The stadium is part of the campus of the Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez and holds 19,703 people.

Draw

The six teams were drawn into two groups of three teams. Defending CONCACAF Olympic Qualifying Championship champion and 2004 Olympic gold medalist United States were seeded in Group A. [1]

Squads

Group stage

The top two teams of each group advance to the semi-finals. [2]

All times are local, CST (UTC−6).

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States 220091+86 Knockout stage
2Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico (H)210194+53
3Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 2002114130
Source:
(H) Host.
Mexico  Flag of Mexico.svg8–1Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Lopez Soccerball shade.svg 18', 28', 36', 53'
Worbis Soccerball shade.svg 23'
Morales Soccerball shade.svg 25', 66'
Ocampo Soccerball shade.svg 80'
Report Davis Soccerball shade.svg 58'
Estadio Olímpico Benito Juárez, Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Attendance: 20185
Referee: Jennifer Bennett (United States)
Jamaica  Flag of Jamaica.svg0–6Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report Lloyd Soccerball shade.svg 16'
Cheney Soccerball shade.svg 21'
Wambach Soccerball shade.svg 53' (pen.), 68'
O'Reilly Soccerball shade.svg 88'
Heath Soccerball shade.svg 90+5'
Estadio Olímpico Benito Juárez, Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Attendance: 5,853
Referee: Diane Ferreira-James (Guyana)
United States  Flag of the United States.svg3–1Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Kai Soccerball shade.svg 14', 45'
Wambach Soccerball shade.svg 33'
Report
Estadio Olímpico Benito Juárez, Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Attendance: 22,280
Referee: Erika Vargas (Costa Rica)

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 220070+76 Knockout stage
2Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 20112311
3Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 20112861
Source:
Costa Rica  Flag of Costa Rica.svg2–2Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago
Wilson Soccerball shade.svg 21'
Granados Soccerball shade.svg 90+'
Report Cordner Soccerball shade.svg 8'
Attin-Johnson Soccerball shade.svg 35'
Estadio Olímpico Benito Juárez, Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Attendance: 5,853
Referee: Carol Chennard (Canada)
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg1–0Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica
Tancredi Soccerball shade.svg 15' Report
Estadio Olímpico Benito Juárez, Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Attendance: 22,080
Referee: Kari Seitz (United States)

Knockout stage

In the knockout stage, if a match is level at the end of regular time (two periods of 45 minutes), extra time is played (two periods of 15 minutes) and followed, if necessary, by a penalty shoot-out to determine the winner. In the case of the third place match, as it is played just before the final, extra time is skipped and a penalty shoot-out takes place.

Bracket

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
9 April – Ciudad Juarez
 
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1
 
12 April – Ciudad Juarez
 
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 0
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1 (5)
 
9 April – Ciudad Juarez
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States(pen.)1 (6)
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3
 
 
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 0
 
Third place
 
 
12 April — Ciudad Juarez
 
 
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 1
 
 
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 0

Semi-finals

Winners qualify for 2008 Summer Olympics.

Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg1–0Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Tancredi Soccerball shade.svg 25' Report
Estadio Olímpico Benito Juárez, Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Attendance: 19,850
Referee: Kari Seitz (United States)
United States  Flag of the United States.svg3–0Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica
Kai Soccerball shade.svg 57', 89'
O'Reilly Soccerball shade.svg 72'
Report
Estadio Olímpico Benito Juárez, Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Attendance: 19,850
Referee: Dianne Ferreira-James (Guyana)

Third Place Game

Costa Rica  Flag of Costa Rica.svg0–1Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Report Gordillo Soccerball shade.svg 69'
Estadio Olímpico Benito Juárez, Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Attendance: 4,115
Referee: Carol Chennard (Canada)

Final

Goalscorers

4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "2008 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualification set for Mexico". Archived from the original on 2016-12-20. Retrieved 2016-12-02.
  2. 1 2 3 "Women's Olympic Qualifying 2008 Recap". Archived from the original on 2016-07-13. Retrieved 2016-12-02.