2009 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship

Last updated
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 2009
Championship details
Dates20 June - 13 September 2009
Teams8
All-Ireland champions
Winners Cork (24th win)
Captain Amanda O'Regan
Manager Denise Cronin
All-Ireland runners-up
Runners-up Kilkenny
Captain Ann Dalton
Manager Ann Downey
Championship statistics
Matches played15
2008
2010

The 2009 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship known as the Gala All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship for sponsorship reasons [1] [2] is the high point of the 2009 season in the sport of camogie. It commenced on 20 June 2009 and ended with the final on 13 September 2009. Eight teams competed in the Senior Championship out of twenty-seven who competed overall in the Senior, Intermediate and Junior Championships. [1] The final of the 2009 Senior Championship was contested by Cork the reigning championsand Kilkenny at Croke Park on 13 September 2009. The final was available to view worldwide. Cork were the champions. [3]

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-eighth title following a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

Gala is a convenience store chain in Ireland. Established in 1998, Gala now has 200 stores nationwide, all under franchise. In 2008 they celebrated their tenth year in business. Gary Desmond is the Chief Executive Officer.

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women; it is almost identical to the game of hurling played by men. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities. It is organised by the Dublin-based Camogie Association or An Cumann Camógaíochta. UNESCO lists Camogie as an element of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Contents

Launch

The Championship was launched in Croke Park, Dublin on 10 June 2009. [1] Camogie Association of Ireland President Joan O'Flynn said at the launch that the 2009 Championship would be "the highest profile yet". [4] The Camogie Association also announced the use of county grounds for the first time, with the aim of improving attendances and facilities. [4] This led to some debate on the role of women in sport, with Marie O'Halloran of The Irish Times claiming that female athletes were "still playing second fiddle". [5] Camogie county boards were also undecided whether their players would dress in a skirt or shortsthey presently wear "skorts". [5]

Croke Park stadium in Dublin, Ireland

Croke Park is a Gaelic Athletic Association stadium located in Dublin, Ireland. Named in honour of Archbishop Thomas Croke, it is often called Croker by some GAA fans and locals. It serves both as the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA).

Dublin Capital city of Ireland

Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland. Situated on a bay on the east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey, it lies within the province of Leinster. It is bordered on the south by the Dublin Mountains, a part of the Wicklow Mountains range. It has an urban area population of 1,173,179, while the population of the Dublin Region as of 2016 was 1,347,359. The population of the Greater Dublin Area was 1,904,806 per the 2016 census.

The Irish Times is an Irish daily broadsheet newspaper launched on 29 March 1859. The editor is Paul O'Neill who succeeded Kevin O'Sullivan on 5 April 2017; the deputy editor is Deirdre Veldon. The Irish Times is published every day except Sundays. It employs 420 people.

Summary

The eight teams were drawn into two groups of four. Each team played one another once only. [4] The top two in each group contested the semi-finals. Cork went into the 2009 Senior Championship as reigning champions. [6] They began their title challenge by dismissing Dublin. [1] League champions Wexford began their challenge with a game against Limerick in Hospital. [1]

Cork GAA irish Gaelic Athletic Association

The Cork County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Cork GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Cork and the Cork inter-county teams. It is one of the constituent counties of Munster GAA.

Dublin GAA Irish Gaelic football team

The Dublin County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Dublin GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in the Dublin Region and the Dublin inter-county teams. The team and its fans are known as "The Dubs" or “Boys in Blue”. The fans have a special affiliation with the Hill 16 end of Croke Park.

Wexford GAA

The Wexford County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Wexford GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Wexford. The county board is also responsible for the Wexford inter-county teams.

The semi-finals were contested at Nowlan Park, Kilkenny on 15 August 2009. [6] Galway versus Kilkenny and Cork versus Wexford were the semi-finals. [6] Cork and Kilkenny progressed to the final. [7] Kilkenny's victory over Galway was unexpected as 33% of their team was under the age of twenty. [8]

Nowlan Park is the principal Gaelic Athletic Association stadium in Kilkenny, Ireland. Named after James Nowlan, the stadium hosts major hurling matches and is home to the Kilkenny hurling team.

Kilkenny City in Leinster, Ireland

Kilkenny is a city in Ireland and the county town of County Kilkenny in the province of Leinster. It is built on both banks of the River Nore. The city is administered as a municipal district within Kilkenny County Council, although the Local Government Reform Act 2014 allowed for "the continued use of the description city". The 2016 census gave the total population of Kilkenny as 26,512.

Galway GAA Irish Gaelic Athletic Association

The Galway County Boards of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Galway GAA are one of the 32 GAA county boards in Ireland; they are responsible for Gaelic games in County Galway, and for the Galway inter-county teams.

Prior to the final, representatives from both the Minor (Offaly versus Waterford) and Senior Championship finals met President Joan O'Flynn at Croke Park. [2] The teams were named on 10 September 2009. [9] The semi-final between Kilkenny and Galway in which Kilkenny produced a late surge to snatch victory deep in injury-time to qualify for their first final since 2001 was described as “one of the most memorable games ever played in Nowlan Park.” [10] The final between Cork and Kilkenny was played at Croke Park on 13 September 2009 and was broadcast live in Ireland on RTÉ Two and internationally on RTÉ.ie. [9] [11] [12] Highlights were shown on The Sunday Game in Ireland and worldwide on the same channels. [2] Cork were featuring in their eighth consecutive final, whilst Kilkenny last appeared in the final in 2001 when they lost to Tipperary. [2] Kilkenny last won the final in 1995. [2] The teams had met earlier in the Championship in Group 1 when Cork beat Kilkenny by a scoreline of 2-05 to 0-07. [13]

Offaly GAA County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association in Offaly

The Offaly County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Offaly GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Offaly. Separate county boards are also responsible for the Offaly inter-county teams.

Waterford GAA

The Waterford County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Waterford GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for all levels of Gaelic games in County Waterford. The County Board is also responsible for the Waterford inter-county teams. The county board's offices are based at Walsh Park in the city of Waterford. The Waterford County Board was founded in 1886.

RTÉ.ie

RTÉ.ie is the brand name and home of RTÉ's online activities, located at the URL http://rte.ie. The site began publishing on 26 May 1996. According to RTÉ, it operates on an entirely commercial basis, receiving none of the licence fee which funds much of RTÉ's activity. The site, it says, is funded by advertising and section sponsorship. However, RTÉ has had to defend itself from allegations of anti-competitiveness brought about by licence fee support.

The Gala Performance Award was awarded the player who topped a public poll as having given the season's best performance. [1] [4]

Fixtures and results

Group A

Cork 3–21 – 1–6 Dublin

Tipperary 1–11 – 1–14 Kilkenny

Kilkenny 0–7 – 2–5 Cork

Tipperary 2–12 – 1–10 Dublin

Cork 1–13 – 0–14 Tipperary

Dublin 0–4 – 2–14 Kilkenny
TeamPldWDLFADiffPts
Cork 33006–391–27+276
Kilkenny 32013–353–20+154
Tipperary 31023–373–3702
Dublin 30032–207–47–420

Group B

Limerick 0–6 – 5–20 Wexford

Galway 3–17 – 1–4 Clare

Wexford 2–6 – 3–7 Galway

Clare 2–8 – 1–10 Limerick

Galway 1–16 – 0–8 Limerick

Clare 0–3 – 2–15 Wexford
TeamPldWDLFADiffPts
Galway 33007–403–18+346
Wexford 32019–413–16+434
Clare 31023–156–42–362
Limerick 30031–248–44–410

Final stages

Cork 2–13 – 1–10 Wexford

Galway 1–11 – 1–13 Kilkenny

Cork 0-15 0-7 Kilkenny
R Moloney 0-7, G O’Connor 0-3, E O’Farrell, K Mackey 0-1 each. A Neary 0-5; A Dalton, M Quilty 0-1 each.
Croke Park, Dublin
Attendance: 25,924
Referee: Una Kearney (Armagh)
Kit left arm red 2.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body red.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm red 3.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Cork
Kit left arm borderonblack.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body blackstripes.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm borderonblack.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Kilkenny
CORK:
GK1 Aoife Murray (Cloughduv)
RCB2 Joanne O'Callaghan (Cloughduv) Sub off.svg 59'
FB3 Cathriona Foley (Rockbán)
LCB4 Rena Buckley (Inniscarra)
RWB5 Jenny Duffy (St Finbarr's)
CB6 Mary O'Connor (Killeagh)
LWB7 Sara Hayes (Courcey Rovers)
MF8 Briege Corkery (Cloughduv)
MF9 Orla Cotter (St Catherine’s)
RWF10 Eimear O'Sullivan (Ballinhassig) (0-2),
CF11 Gemma O'Connor (St Finbarr's) (0-3)
LWF12 Una O'Donoghue (Cloughduv) (0-1) Sub off.svg 47'
RCF13 Síle Burns (Rockbán)
FF14 Emer O'Farrell (Sarsfields) (0-1), Sub off.svg 37'
LCF15 Rachel Moloney (Courcey Rovers) (0-7, 6f). Sub off.svg 57'
Substitutes:
FF Katriona Mackey (Douglas) (0-1) for O'Farrell Sub on.svg 37'
LWF Emer Dillon (Ballygarvan) for O'Donoghue Sub on.svg 47'
LCF Amanda O'Regan (Douglas) for Moloney Sub on.svg 57'
RCB Lynda O'Connell (St Finbarr's) for O'Callaghan Sub on.svg 59'
KILKENNY:
GK1 Caitriona Ryan (Tullogher)
RCB2 Leann Fennelly (Mullinavat)
FB3 Catherine Doherty (St Anne's)
LCB4 Jacqui Frisby (Ballyhale Shamrocks)
RWB5 Lizzie Lyng (Rower-Innistioge) Sub off.svg 37'
CB6 Amy Butler (Mullinavat)
LWB7 Elaine Aylward (Mullinavat)
MF8 Collette Dormer (Paulstown) (0-1) Sub off.svg 57'
MF9 Ann Dalton (St Lachtain's) (0-1)
RWF10 Therese Muldowney (St Brigid's) Sub off.svg 17'
CF11 Katie Power (Piltown)
LWF12 Edwina Keane (St Martin's)
RCF13 Michelle Quilty (Mullinavat) (0-1), Sub off.svg 50'
FF14 Denise Gaule (Windgap)
LCF15 Aoife Neary (James Stephens) (0-5, 4f, 1 45)
Substitutes:
RWF Aisling Dunphy (St Brigid's) for Muldowney Sub on.svg 17'
RWB Deirdre Delaney (St Lachtain's) for Lyng Sub on.svg 37'
RCF Marie O'Connor (St Lachtain's) for Quilty Sub on.svg 50'
MF Keeva Fennelly (Ballyhale Shamrocks) for Dormer Sub on.svg 57'

MATCH RULES

  • 60 minutes
  • Replay if scores level
  • Maximum of 5 substitutions

Gala Performance awards 2009

Overall winner: Chloe Morey Clare

Championship statistics

Scoring

Related Research Articles

The 2003 All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship was the 117th since its establishment in 1887. The first matches of the season were played in May 2003, and the championship ended on 14 September 2003. Kilkenny went into the 2003 championship as defending champions, having won their twenty-seventh All-Ireland title the previous year.

The 1999 All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship was the 113th staging of the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship, the Gaelic Athletic Association's premier inter-county hurling tournament. The draw for the fixtures took place on 15 November 1998. The championship began on 22 May 1999 and ended on 12 September 1999.

The 1990 All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship was the 104th staging of the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship, the Gaelic Athletic Association's premier inter-county hurling tournament. The draw for the 1990 provincial fixtures took place in November 1989. The championship began on 13 May 1990 and ended on 2 September 1990.

The 1970 All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship was the 84th staging of the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship, the Gaelic Athletic Association's premier inter-county hurling tournament. The championship began on 3 May 1970 and ended on 6 September 1970.

The All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship of 1972 was the 85th staging of Ireland's premier hurling knock-out competition. Kilkenny won the championship, beating Cork 3-24 to 5-11 in the final at Croke Park, Dublin.

The All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship 2008 was the 122nd since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 1887. The first matches of the season were played on 25 May 2008, and the championship ended on 7 September 2008. Kilkenny went into the 2008 championship as defending champions, having won their thirtieth All-Ireland title the previous year.

The 2009 All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship was the 123rd staging of the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship, the Gaelic Athletic Association's premier inter-county hurling tournament. The draw for the 2000 fixtures took place on 8 October 2008. The championship began on 30 May 2009 and ended on 6 September 2009.

The Ashbourne Cup is an Irish camogie tournament played each year to determine the national champion university or third level college. The Ashbourne Cup is the highest division in inter-collegiate camogie. The competition features many of the current stars of the game and is sometimes known as the ‘Olympics of Camogie’ because of the disproportionate number of All Star and All-Ireland elite level players who participate each year Since 1972 it has been administered by the Higher Education committee of the Camogie Association.

The 2010 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship—known as the Gala All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship for sponsorship reasons—is the high point of the 2010 season in the sport of camogie. It commenced on June 13, 2010 and ended with the final between Galway and Wexford on 12 September 2010 which Wexford won by 1-12 to 1-10. Seven teams compete in the Senior Championship out of twenty-seven who competed overall in the Senior, Intermediate and Junior Championships.

The All-Ireland Intermediate Camogie Championship is the most important competition in the women’s field sport of camogie for second-tier county teams and for second-string teams of first-tier counties. If the winning team comes from a second-tier county, that county is promoted to the following year's senior championship. Similarly, the winner of the All-Ireland junior championship is promoted to the following year's Intermediate Championship. The grade mirrors Division 2 of the National Camogie League. The final is played in Croke Park Dublin alongside the Senior and Junior finals. The competition is contested by Antrim, Kildare, Down, Meath, Waterford and the second teams of Cork, Galway, Kilkenny, Tipperary and Wexford.

The 2011 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship—known as the All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship in association with RTÉ Sport for sponsorship reasons— is the premier competition of the 2011 camogie season. It commenced on 11 June 2011 and ended with the final on 11 September. Eight county teams compete in the Senior Championship out of twenty-seven who compete overall in the Senior, Intermediate and Junior Championships. Wexford defeated Galway in the final, avenging a surprise 11-point defeat in the round-robin stage of the championship.

The 2011 National Camogie League was won by Wexford, their third league title in succession. The final was played on April 17 2011 as a curtain raiser to the hurling match between Tipperary and Wexford at Semple Stadium and drew an attendance of 4,180.

The 2005 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship—known as the Foras na Gaeilge All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship for sponsorship reasons—was the high point of the 2005 season in the sport of camogie. The championship was won for the 21st time by Cork who defeated Tipperary by a four-point margin in the final and became part of the legendary “rebel treble” of 2005 when Cork won the senior hurling, camogie and ladies’ football titles. The attendance was 14,350.

The 2006 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship—known as the Gala All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship for sponsorship reasons—was the high point of the 2006 season in the sport of camogie. The championship was won for the 22nd time by Cork who defeated Tipperary by an eight-point margin in the final despite having lost to them in the group stages. Rena Buckley was player of the match. The attendance was 20,685, at the time the second highest in camogie history.

The 2007 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship—known as the Gala All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship for sponsorship reasons—was the high point of the 2007 season in the sport of camogie. The championship was won by Wexford who defeated Cork by a two-point margin in the final thanks to two first-half goals by ‘player of the match’ Una Leacy. The final attracted a record attendance of 33,154.

The 2004 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship—known as the Foras na Gaeilge All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship for sponsorship reasons—was the high point of the 2004 season, the centenary year for the sport of camogie. The championship was won by Tipperary who defeated Cork by an eight-point margin in the final. The attendance was a then record of 24,567.

The 1992 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1992 season. The championship was won by Cork, who defeated Wexford by a 14-point margin in the final for their third successive success. The match drew an attendance of 4,000.

The 2012 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship—known as the All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship in association with RTÉ Sport for sponsorship reasons— is the premier competition of the 2012 camogie season. It commenced on 23 June 2012 and ended with the final on 16 September. Eight county teams compete in the Senior Championship out of twenty-seven who compete overall in the Senior, Intermediate and Junior Championships. Wexford defeated Cork in the final. The championship was notable for the qualification of Offaly for the All-Ireland semi-final just three years after they had been graded junior. Quarter-final stages of the championships were re-introduced for the first time since 2006. The 2012 championship was the first to be held under new rules which allowed two points for a point direct from a sideline ball.

The 2013 All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship was the 126th staging of the All-Ireland championship since its establishment in 1887. The draw for the 2013 fixtures took place on 4 October 2012. The championship began on 5 May 2013 and ended on 28 September 2013 with Clare winning their fourth All Ireland title after a 5-16 to 3-16 win against Cork in the replayed final.

2019 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Final

The 2019 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Final, the 88th event of its kind and the culmination of the 2019 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship, is played at Croke Park in Dublin on 8 September 2019.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Gala Camogie Championship is launched". RTÉ. 2009-06-10. Archived from the original on 2009-06-12. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 "Camogie finalists gear up for big day". RTÉ. 2009-09-08. Archived from the original on 2009-09-09. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
  3. "Cork 0-15 Kilkenny 0-07". RTÉ. 2009-09-13. Archived from the original on 2009-09-15. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
  4. 1 2 3 4 "Camogie matches set for county grounds". The Irish Times . 2009-06-11. Retrieved 2009-09-13. Splitting up the senior championship into two groups of four, with each team only playing each other once, will help peak interest said O’Flynn.
  5. 1 2 Marie O'Halloran (2009-08-14). "Women in sport still playing second fiddle". The Irish Times . Retrieved 2009-09-13.
  6. 1 2 3 "Camogie semi-final previews". RTÉ. 2009-08-13. Archived from the original on 2009-08-17. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
  7. "Kilkenny and Cork to meet in Camogie final". RTÉ. 2009-08-15. Archived from the original on 2009-09-18. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
  8. "Kilkenny upset the odds". The Irish Times . 2009-08-17. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
  9. 1 2 "Cork and Kilkenny name teams". RTÉ. 2009-09-10. Retrieved 2009-09-13.[ permanent dead link ]
  10. "Cork v Kilkenny preview". RTÉ. 2009-09-11. Archived from the original on 2009-09-14. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
  11. "All-Ireland camogie finals take centre stage at Croker". Irish Independent . 2009-08-26. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
  12. "Cork pushed all the way by the Cats". RTÉ. 2009-07-12. Retrieved 2009-09-13.[ permanent dead link ]
Preceded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 2008
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
1932 – present
Succeeded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 2010