2010 XC15

Last updated

2010 XC15
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Catalina Sky Survey (703)
0.68-m Schmidt
Discovery date2010-12-05
Designations
2010 XC15
Orbital characteristics [2]
Epoch 2020-Dec-17 (JD  2459200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 1
Observation arc 10.1 years
Aphelion 1.0412  AU (155.76  Gm) (Q)
Perihelion 0.42875 AU (64.140 Gm) (q)
0.73497 AU (109.950 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.41665 (e)
0.63  yr (230.15  d)
151.705° (M)
1.5638°/day (n)
Inclination 8.3848° (i)
94.474° (Ω)
157.66° (ω)
Earth  MOID 0.002356 AU (352,500 km)
Jupiter  MOID 3.9932 AU (597.37 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions~200 metres (660 ft) [3]
21.4 [2]

    2010 XC15 (also written 2010 XC15) is an Aten near-Earth asteroid and potentially hazardous object that spends most of its time inside of the orbit of Earth. [2] It has an observation arc of 10 years and an Uncertainty Parameter of 1. [2] It was discovered on 5 December 2010 by the Catalina Sky Survey at an apparent magnitude of 17.5 using a 0.68-metre (27 in) Schmidt. [1]

    Based on an absolute magnitude of 21.4, [2] the asteroid has an estimated diameter of about 200 metres (660 ft). [3] 2010 XC15 is noted for a close approach to Earth on 27 December 1976 at a distance of about 0.00625  AU (935,000  km ; 581,000  mi ). [4] [5] In November 2011 with an observation arc of 40 days, the JPL Small-Body Database showed that the uncertainty region of the asteroid during the 1976 close approach could result in a pass anywhere from 0.001 AU to 0.018 AU from Earth. [4] During the 1976 close approach the asteroid reached about apparent magnitude 14. [6]

    The asteroid will pass 0.00516 AU (772,000 km; 480,000 mi) from Earth on 27 December 2022, [4] [5] allowing a refinement to the known trajectory. The uncertainty region in 2013 suggested that the asteroid could have passed inside the orbit of the Moon in 1907, but is now known to have passed about 0.01 AU (1,500,000 km; 930,000 mi) from Earth in 1907. [4]

    2010 XC15
    Position uncertainty and increasing divergence [4]
    Date JPL SBDB
    nominal geocentric
    distance (AU)
    uncertainty
    region
    (3-sigma)
    1907-12-260.011466 AU (1.7153 million km)±640 thousand km
    1914-12-270.005121 AU (766.1 thousand km)±21 thousand km
    1976-12-270.006253 AU (935.4 thousand km)±260 km
    2022-12-270.005160 AU (771.9 thousand km)±320 km
    2064-12-260.008920 AU (1.3344 million km)±80 thousand km
    2096-12-270.004309 AU (644.6 thousand km)±660 thousand km

    The asteroid 2002 JE9 , with a much larger observation arc, is known to have passed 0.0015 AU (220,000 km; 140,000 mi) from Earth on 11 April 1971.

    Related Research Articles

    (89959) 2002 NT7 (prov. designation:2002 NT7) is a near-Earth object with a diameter of 1.4 kilometers and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Apollo group. It has a well determined orbit with an observation arc of 64 years including precovery images by Palomar Observatory dating back to 1954.

    2010 RF12 is a very small asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Apollo group, that passed between Earth and the Moon on 8 September 2010, at 21:12 UTC, approaching Earth within 79,000 kilometres (49,000 mi) above Antarctica. It is listed on the Sentry Risk Table as the asteroid with the greatest known probability (5%) of impacting Earth. On 5 September 2096 the asteroid will approach the Earth and the line of variation (LOV) passes through where the Earth will be. The asteroid was discovered by the Mount Lemmon Survey near Tucson, Arizona on 5 September 2010 along with 2010 RX30.

    <span class="nowrap">(276033) 2002 AJ<sub>129</sub></span>

    (276033) 2002 AJ129, provisional designation 2002 AJ129, is a Mercury-crossing asteroid. It has the ninth-smallest perihelion of all numbered asteroids, after asteroids such as 2000 BD19, 2004 UL, and 2008 XM. It makes close approaches to all of the inner planets and asteroid 4 Vesta. The asteroid is estimated to be between 0.5–1.2 kilometers (0.3–0.7 mi) across. In January 2018 there was much media hype about this asteroid being classified as a potentially hazardous asteroid, although there is no known threat of an impact for hundreds if not thousands of years. The media has compared the size of the asteroid to the Burj Khalifa in Dubai.

    2002 JE9 (also written 2002 JE9) is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid and potentially hazardous object. It has a well determined orbit with an observation arc of 10 years and an Uncertainty Parameter of 1. It was removed from the Sentry Risk Table on 10 May 2002. 2002 JE9 was discovered on 6 May 2002 by the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) project using a 1.0-metre (39 in) Reflecting telescope; at the time of discovery, the asteroid possessed an apparent magnitude of 19.1.

    (152680) 1998 KJ9 is a sub-kilometer asteroid, classified as near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Apollo group. Based on absolute magnitude, it is the third largest asteroid known to have passed closer than the Moon.

    2009 RR micro-asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Apollo group. It was discovered on 11 September 2009 by the Catalina Sky Survey at an apparent magnitude of 19.5 using a 0.68-meter (27 in) Schmidt–Cassegrain telescope. 2009 RR was the only asteroid discovered before 2014 that was predicted to potentially pass inside the orbit of the Moon during 2014. The asteroid has an estimated diameter of 26 meters (85 ft) and is listed on the Sentry Risk Table. It is not large enough to qualify as a potentially hazardous object.

    2014 AF5 (also written 2014 AF5) is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid roughly 5–10 meters in diameter that passed less than 1 lunar distance from Earth on 1 January 2014.

    2011 XC2 (also written 2011 XC2) is a near-Earth asteroid roughly 60–140 meters (200–460 ft) in diameter that passed less than 1 lunar distance from Earth on 3 December 2011.

    2014 DX110 is a sub-kilometer asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Apollo group, approximately 30 meters in diameter. It passed less than 1 lunar distance from Earth on 5 March 2014. With an absolute magnitude of 25.7, this asteroid is potentially the largest asteroid to come inside the orbit of the Moon since 2013 PJ10 on 4 August 2013. The close approach was webcast live by Slooh and Virtual Telescope.

    2010 XG11 is an Amor near-Earth asteroid. It was discovered on 5 December 2010 by the Catalina Sky Survey at an apparent magnitude of 19.7 using a 0.68-meter (27 in) Schmidt–Cassegrain telescope. Three precovery images are known from 1 July 1995. With an observation arc of 16 years, the orbit is well determined with an orbital uncertainty of 0. With an absolute magnitude of 20.0, the asteroid is about 270–590 meters in diameter.

    2014 SC324 is a sub-kilometer asteroid and fast rotator, classified as a near-Earth object of the Apollo group, approximately 50 meters in diameter. It was first observed on 30 September 2014, by the Mount Lemmon Survey at an apparent magnitude of 21 using a 1.5-meter (59 in) reflecting telescope. With an absolute magnitude of 24.3, the asteroid is about 37–85 meters in diameter.

    2014 OO6 (also written 2014 OO6) is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid discovered in 2014 and was the most dangerous one discovered in 2014 that remained on the Sentry Risk Table as of early December 2014. The asteroid is estimated to be roughly 75 meters (246 ft) in diameter and had a 1 in 83,000 chance of impacting Earth on 11 January 2051. However, the nominal best-fit orbit shows that 2014 OO6 will be 1.5 AU (220,000,000 km; 140,000,000 mi) from Earth on 11 January 2051.

    2007 VE191 is a sub-kilometer asteroid, classified as near-Earth asteroid of the Apollo group that was listed on the Sentry Risk Table.

    2014 XL7 is a near-Earth object and Apollo asteroid, approximately 230 meters (750 feet) in diameter. It was the most dangerous potentially hazardous asteroid on Sentry Risk Table upon its discovery by the Mount Lemmon Survey in December 2014. At the time, the asteroid had a cumulative 1 in 83000 chance of impacting Earth on 4–5 June between the years 2048 and 2084. After the object's observation arc had been extended to 35 days, it was removed from the Sentry Risk Table on 15 January 2015. Since then the asteroid's orbit has been secured. Although it has an Earth minimum orbit intersection distance of less than one lunar distance, there are no projected close encounters with Earth in the foreseeable future, with its closest passage to occur in May 2046, still millions of kilometers away.

    2015 AZ43 (also written 2015 AZ43) is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid roughly 70 meters in diameter. On 10 February 2015 with a 29.5-day observation arc, it showed a 1 in 5,880 chance of impacting Earth on 27 February 2107. However, the NEODyS nominal best-fit orbit shows that 2015 AZ43 will be 2.8 AU (420,000,000 km; 260,000,000 mi) from Earth on 27 February 2107. A (non-impacting) Earth close approach in 2056 makes future trajectories diverge. It was removed from the JPL Sentry Risk Table on 23 February 2015 using JPL solution 26 with an observation arc of 40 days that included radar data.

    2013 TX68 is an Apollo asteroid and near-Earth object discovered on 6 October 2013 by the Catalina Sky Survey, during which it was near a close approach of 5.4 Lunar distances (LD) from the Earth. The asteroid only has a 10-day observation arc which makes long-term predictions of its position less certain. It was observed for three days as it approached Earth in the night sky starting with the sixth of October, 2013. Then it became unobservable by being between the Earth and the Sun, then not recovered due to its small size and dimness. Precovery images by Pan-STARRS from 29 September 2013 were announced on 11 February 2016 that extended the observation arc to 10 days. It was removed from the Sentry Risk Table on 11 February 2016, so there is no risk of impact from this object for the next hundred years or more. The asteroid was last observed on 9 October 2013.

    2015 XY261 (also written 2015 XY261) is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid that is also a Mars crosser. It is roughly 10–22 meters in diameter and passed less than 1 lunar distance, 0.0025696 AU (384,410 km; 238,860 mi) from Earth on 15 December 2015.

    2011 ES4 (also written 2011 ES4) is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid roughly 22–49 meters (72–160 feet) in diameter. It was first observed on 2 March 2011 when the asteroid was about 0.054 AU (8,100,000 km; 5,000,000 mi) from Earth and had a solar elongation of 159 degrees. It passed closest approach to Earth on 13 March 2011. Before the 2020 approach, the asteroid had a short observation arc of 4 days and had not been observed since March 2011. The asteroid was expected to pass within 1 lunar distance of Earth in early September 2020, but did not. There was no risk of a 2020 impact because the line of variation (LOV) did not pass through where Earth would be, and the closest possible 2020 Earth approach was about 0.00047 AU (70,000 km; 44,000 mi). One line of variation showed the asteroid passing closest to Earth on 5 September 2020 at 0.06 AU (9,000,000 km; 5,600,000 mi) with a magnitude of 23, which would place it near the limiting magnitude of even the best automated astronomical surveys.

    2007 FT3 (also written 2007 FT3) is a lost asteroid with a short observation arc of 1.2 days that can not be recovered with targeted observations and awaits serendipitous survey observations. It has a poorly constrained orbit and has not been seen since 2007. It was first observed on 20 March 2007 when the asteroid was estimated to be 0.19 ± 0.01 AU (28.4 ± 1.5 million km) from Earth and had a solar elongation of 107 degrees. 2007 FT3 is the third largest asteroid with better than a 1 in 1 million cumulative chance of impacting Earth after (29075) 1950 DA and 101955 Bennu.

    1979 XB is a lost asteroid with a short observation arc of 3.9 days that cannot be recovered with targeted observations and awaits serendipitous survey observations. It is classified as a near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Apollo group and is estimated to be 660 meters in diameter. The unnumbered minor planet has a poorly constrained orbit and has not been observed in 40 years. It has been listed on the Sentry Risk Table since the list started in 2002. With a cumulative Palermo Technical Impact Hazard Scale of -2.74, the poorly known orbit and assumed size place 1979 XB fifth on an unconstrained listing of the Sentry Risk Table.

    References

    1. 1 2 "MPEC 2010-X66 : 2010 XC15". IAU Minor Planet Center. 7 December 2010. Retrieved 30 October 2011. (K10X15C)
    2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2010 XC15)" (last observation: 2012-11-25; arc: 1.97 years). Jet Propulsion Laboratory . Retrieved 31 March 2016.
    3. 1 2 "Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs)" (Version 20.1). International Astronomical Union. 13 October 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011.
    4. 1 2 3 4 5 "JPL Close-Approach Data: (2010 XC15)" (last observation: 2012-11-25; arc: 1.97 years). Retrieved 18 September 2013.
    5. 1 2 "NEODyS-2 Close Approaches for 2010XC15". Near Earth Objects  Dynamic Site. Retrieved 30 October 2011.
    6. "2010XC15 Ephemerides for 26 December 1976". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects  Dynamic Site). Retrieved 18 September 2013.