2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Final

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2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Final
Penalty vainqueur de Saki Kumagai en 2011.jpg
Saki Kumagai of Japan scoring the winning penalty
Event 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup
After extra time
Japan won 3–1 on penalties
Date17 July 2011 (2011-07-17)
Venue Waldstadion, Frankfurt
Player of the Match Ayumi Kaihori (Japan)
Referee Bibiana Steinhaus (Germany)
Attendance48,817 [1]
WeatherPartly cloudy
16 °C (61 °F)
77% humidity [2] [3]
2007
2015

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Final was a football match that took place on 17 July 2011 at Commerzbank-Arena, in Frankfurt, Germany, to determine the winner of 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. [4] It was played between Japan and the United States. Japan won 3-1 on a penalty shoot-out following a 2–2 draw after extended time, becoming the first Asian team to win a FIFA World Cup final. [5] [6] [7] [8]

Contents

The 2011 final was the last major sporting event to be broadcast in Japan prior to the country's digital switchover that took place on 24 July 2011.

Background

The match was between the United States (USA), which had been a major power in women's association football since winning the inaugural World Cup championship, and Japan, which had never won a major world title, or indeed even reached the finals of a major world competition. This was also the first appearances of the United States in the final after 12 years. The United States was bidding to become the first team to win a third world championship, having won in 1991 and 1999. [9] Japan became the fourth team to win a world championship, joining the United States, Norway and Germany.

The match was the third between the two teams in World Cup play. The United States beat Japan 3–0 in pool play in 1991, and won 4–0 in a 1995 quarterfinal match. Going into the final, the USA had never lost to Japan, with 22 wins and 3 draws. [10] Prior to the World Cup, the United States was the top-ranked team in the FIFA Women's World Rankings, while Japan was ranked fourth. [11]

This marked the first time that a team won the World Cup having lost a match in pool play. [12]

Japan became only the second Asian national team to reach the FIFA Women's World Cup Final, following China's final appearance against the United States in 1999. This was also only the second final not involving a European team.

Route to the final

JapanRoundUnited States
OpponentResult Group stage OpponentResult
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 2–1Match 1Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 2–0
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 4–0Match 2Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 3–0
Flag of England.svg  England 0–2Match 3Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1–2
PosTeamPldPts
1Flag of England.svg  England 37
2Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 36
3Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 32
4Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 31
Source: FIFA
Final standing
PosTeamPldPts
1Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 39
2Flag of the United States.svg  United States 36
3Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 31
4Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 31
Source: FIFA
OpponentResult Knockout stage OpponentResult
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1–0 (a.e.t.) Quarterfinals Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 2–2 (a.e.t.) (5–3 pen.)
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 3–1 Semifinals Flag of France.svg  France 3–1
Japan's group stage match against England at Impuls Arena JapanvsEngland.jpg
Japan's group stage match against England at Impuls Arena

Despite being ranked 1st in the world by FIFA, [13] the United States was the final team to qualify for the 2011 World Cup. After finishing third in the 2010 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup, which serves as the CONCACAF qualifier, the United States was forced to defeat Italy in a Home and Away playoff. [14] Japan, ranked 4th, [13] qualified for the tournament by finishing third in the 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup, which served as the AFC qualifier.

Once at the finals, the United States reached the knockout stage by finishing second in Group C behind Sweden, the only team they lost to in group play. They advanced through the quarterfinals on a penalty shootout with Brazil, in which the United States footballer Abby Wambach scored an equalizer in the 122nd minute of the game – in stoppage time, the latest goal ever scored in Women's World Cup play, [15] – to tie the game 2–2 and bring the game into a penalty shootout. The United States then defeated France 3–1 to reach the final. [16]

Japan reached the knockout stage by finishing second in Group B behind England, which was the only team to defeat Japan in group play. [17] [18] Japan then stunned the host nation, two-time defending champions Germany, 1–0 in extra time. [19] They then defeated Sweden 3–1 to reach the final match. [20]

Match

Details

Japan  Flag of Japan.svg2–2 (a.e.t.)Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report
Penalties
3–1
Waldstadion, Frankfurt
Attendance: 48,817 [1]
Referee: Bibiana Steinhaus (Germany)
Kit left arm JFA 10h.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body JFA 10h womens.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm JFA 10h.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts STRICON WHITE.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks 3 stripes white.png
Kit socks long.svg
Japan [21]
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body US women 2011.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
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United States [21]
GK21 Ayumi Kaihori
RB2 Yukari Kinga
CB3 Azusa Iwashimizu Red card.svg 120+1'
CB4 Saki Kumagai
LB15 Aya Sameshima
RM11 Shinobu Ohno Sub off.svg 66'
CM6 Mizuho Sakaguchi
CM10 Homare Sawa (c)
LM8 Aya Miyama Yellow card.svg 97'
CF7 Kozue Ando Sub off.svg 66'
CF9 Nahomi Kawasumi
Substitutions:
FW18 Karina Maruyama Sub on.svg 66'Sub off.svg 119'
FW17 Yūki Nagasato Sub on.svg 66'
FW20 Mana Iwabuchi Sub on.svg 119'
Manager:
Norio Sasaki
JPN-USA (women) 2011-07-17.svg
GK1 Hope Solo
RB11 Ali Krieger
CB19 Rachel Buehler
CB3 Christie Rampone (c)
LB6 Amy LePeilbet
RM9 Heather O'Reilly
CM10 Carli Lloyd
CM7 Shannon Boxx
LM15 Megan Rapinoe Sub off.svg 114'
SS12 Lauren Cheney Sub off.svg 46'
CF20 Abby Wambach
Substitutions:
FW13 Alex Morgan Sub on.svg 46'
MF17 Tobin Heath Sub on.svg 114'
Manager:
Flag of Sweden.svg Pia Sundhage

Player of the Match:
Ayumi Kaihori (Japan)

Assistant referees:
Marina Wozniak (Germany) [22]
Katrin Rafalski (Germany) [22]
Fourth official:
Jenny Palmqvist (Sweden) [22]

Statistics

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References

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