2011 New South Wales state election

Last updated

2011 New South Wales state election
Flag of New South Wales.svg
  2007 26 March 2011 2015  

All 93 seats in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly
and 21 (of the 42) seats in the New South Wales Legislative Council
47 Assembly seats were needed for a majority
 First partySecond partyThird party
  Premier Barry O'Farrell - Flickr - Eva Rinaldi Celebrity and Live Music Photographer.jpg Kristina KeneallyCrop.jpg Greens placeholder-01.png
Leader Barry O'Farrell Kristina Keneally no leader
Party Liberal/National coalition Labor Greens
Leader since4 April 20074 December 2009
Leader's seat Ku-ring-gai Heffron
Last election35 seats52 seats0 seats
Seats won69 seats20 seats1 seats
Seat changeIncrease2.svg34Decrease2.svg32Increase2.svg 1
Popular vote2,124,3211,061,352427,144
Percentage51.15%25.55%10.29%
SwingIncrease2.svg14.16%Decrease2.svg13.43%Increase2.svg 1.33%
TPP 64.22%35.78%
TPP swingIncrease2.svg16.48Decrease2.svg16.48

2011 New South Wales election - Vote Strength.svg
The top map shows the first party preference by electorate. The bottom map shows the final two-party preferred vote result by electorate.

Premier before election

Kristina Keneally
Labor

Elected Premier

Barry O'Farrell
Liberal/National coalition

Elections to the 55th Parliament of New South Wales were held on Saturday, 26 March 2011. The 16-year-incumbent Labor Party government led by Premier Kristina Keneally was defeated in a landslide by the LiberalNational Coalition opposition led by Barry O'Farrell. Labor suffered a two-party swing of 16.4 points, the largest against a sitting government at any level in Australia since World War II. From 48 seats at dissolution, Labor was knocked down to 20 seats—the worst defeat of a sitting government in New South Wales history, and one of the worst of a state government in Australia since federation. The Coalition picked up a 34-seat swing to win a strong majority, with 69 seats–the largest majority government, in terms of percentage of seats controlled, in NSW history. It is only the third time since 1941 that a NSW Labor government has been defeated.

Contents

New South Wales has compulsory voting, with an optional preferential ballot in single-member seats for the lower house and single transferable vote with optional preferential above-the-line voting in the proportionally represented upper house. The election was conducted by the New South Wales Electoral Commission (NSWEC).

Results

Lower house

New South Wales state election, 26 March 2011 [1] [2] [3]
Legislative Assembly
<< 20072015 >>

Enrolled voters4,635,810
Votes cast4,290,595 Turnout 92.55%–0.09%
Informal votes137,260Informal3.20%+0.43%
Summary of votes by party
PartyPrimary votes%SwingSeatsChange
  Liberal 1,602,45738.58+11.6451+29
  Labor 1,061,35225.55–13.4320–32
  National 521,86412.56+2.5118+5
  Greens 427,14410.28+1.331+1
  Independent 367,4938.85–0.333–3
  Christian Democrats 129,4313.12+0.6500
  Family First 18,5760.45+0.4500
 Other25,0180.6000
Total4,153,335  93 
Two-party-preferred
  Coalition 2,324,22664.22+16.48
  Labor 1,294,82435.78–16.48
Popular vote
Liberal
38.58%
Labor
25.55%
National
12.56%
Greens
10.28%
Independent
8.85%
Christian Democrats
3.12%
Family First
0.45%
Others
0.60%
Two-party-preferred vote
Coalition
64.22%
Labor
35.78%
Seats
Liberal
54.84%
Labor
21.51%
National
19.35%
Independent
3.23%
Greens
1.08%

Upper house

Legislative Council election, 2011 [4] [5] [6]
PartyVotes% wonSwing2011 seats2007 seatsTotal seatsChange
Liberal/National Coalition 1,943,24647.7↑13.511819↑4
Labor Party 967,24223.7↓15.45914↓5
Greens 453,12511.1↑2.0325↑1
Shooters and Fishers Party 150,7413.7↑0.91120
Christian Democratic Party 127,2333.1↓1.31120
Other434,43710.7↑0.30000
Total4,076,024  212142 

Seats changing hands

SeatPre-2011SwingPost-2011
PartyMemberMarginMarginMemberParty
Balmain  Labor Verity Firth 3.7–7.23.5* Jamie Parker Greens 
Bathurst  Labor Gerard Martin 13.0–36.723.7 Paul Toole National 
Blue Mountains  Labor Phil Koperberg 11.1–15.84.7 Roza Sage Liberal 
Camden  Labor Geoff Corrigan 3.9–22.818.9 Chris Patterson Liberal 
Campbelltown  Labor Graham West 18.5–21.93.4 Bryan Doyle Liberal 
Charlestown  Labor Matthew Morris 14.6–24.59.9 Andrew Cornwell Liberal 
Coogee  Labor Paul Pearce 7.2–15.48.2 Bruce Notley-Smith Liberal 
Dubbo  Independent Dawn Fardell 0.9–14.613.7 Troy Grant National 
Drummoyne  Labor Angela D'Amore 7.6–24.316.7 John Sidoti Liberal 
East Hills  Labor Alan Ashton 14.1–14.70.6 Glenn Brookes Liberal 
Gosford  Labor Marie Andrews 4.9–16.711.9 Chris Holstein Liberal 
Granville  Labor David Borger 11.1–13.72.6 Tony Issa Liberal 
Heathcote  Labor Paul McLeay 8.8–21.412.7 Lee Evans Liberal 
Kiama  Labor Matt Brown 12.0–19.57.5 Gareth Ward Liberal 
Londonderry  Labor Allan Shearan 6.9–19.212.3 Bart Bassett Liberal 
Maitland  Labor Frank Terenzini 9.7–16.06.3 Robyn Parker Liberal 
Menai  Labor Alison Megarrity 2.7–27.124.4 Melanie Gibbons Liberal 
Miranda  Labor Barry Collier 0.8–21.821.0 Graham Annesley Liberal 
Monaro  Labor Steve Whan 6.3–8.32.0 John Barilaro National 
Mulgoa  Labor Diane Beamer 11.1–23.212.0 Tanya Davies Liberal 
Newcastle  Labor Jodi McKay 1.2–3.62.4 Tim Owen Liberal 
Oatley  Labor Kevin Greene 14.4–14.90.5 Mark Coure Liberal 
Parramatta  Labor Tanya Gadiel 13.7–25.812.1 Geoff Lee Liberal 
Port Macquarie  Independent Peter Besseling 28.2**–35.16.9 Leslie Williams National 
Riverstone  Labor John Aquilina 10.1–30.320.2 Kevin Conolly Liberal 
Rockdale  Labor Frank Sartor 10.3–13.93.6 John Flowers Liberal 
Smithfield  Labor Ninos Khoshaba 15.5–20.34.8 Andrew Rohan Liberal 
Strathfield  Labor Virginia Judge 15.1–19.34.3 Charles Casuscelli Liberal 
Swansea  Labor Robert Coombs 10.8–11.91.1 Garry Edwards Liberal 
Tamworth  Independent Peter Draper 4.8–12.57.8 Kevin Anderson National 
The Entrance  Labor Grant McBride 4.9–17.312.5 Chris Spence Liberal 
Wollondilly  Labor Phil Costa 3.3–18.014.7 Jai Rowell Liberal 
Wyong  Labor David Harris 6.9–9.42.5 Darren Webber Liberal 

Background

New South Wales electorates by party before the election NSW Election Map pre-2011.png
New South Wales electorates by party before the election
New South Wales electorates by party after the election NSW Election Map 2011.png
New South Wales electorates by party after the election

The centre-left Labor Party, led by Premier Kristina Keneally, and the centre-right Liberal Party, led by Leader of the Opposition Barry O'Farrell, were the two main parties in New South Wales. In the 2007 state election, of 93 seats total, Labor won 52 seats, the Liberals won 22 seats and the Nationals, led by Andrew Stoner, who are in coalition with the Liberals, won 13 seats. Six seats were retained by independents. Smaller parties which hold no seats in the lower house but achieved significant votes in 2007 include The Greens and the Christian Democratic Party.

On 18 October 2008, four state electorates (Lakemba, Ryde, Cabramatta, Port Macquarie) went to by-elections as a result of the resignation of the Premier, two of his ministers, and an independent who left after winning a federal by-election. The results in Ryde, Cabramatta, and Lakemba showed the largest by-election swing against Labor in its history. [7] The results showed a significant swing towards the Liberal Party with a swing of 22.7 percentage points in former health minister Reba Meagher's seat of Cabramatta, but it was retained by ALP candidate Nick Lalich, [7] and a swing of 13 points against Labor in former premier Morris Iemma's seat of Lakemba, also retained by an ALP candidate, Robert Furolo. [7] Ryde, once a safe Labor seat, with a swing of 23.1 points delivered former deputy premier John Watkins' seat to Victor Dominello. Peter Besseling, the independent candidate, won Port Macquarie, left vacant after the resignation of Nationals-turned-independent member Rob Oakeshott, over the Nationals by a two-party margin of 54.5–45.5%, despite a swing of 23.7 points to the Nationals. On 19 June 2010 a by-election in the electoral district of Penrith [8] was triggered as a result of the resignation of Labor Party MP Karyn Paluzzano, with Liberal candidate Stuart Ayres winning the seat with a two-party-preferred swing of more than 25 points, the biggest swing against an incumbent government in New South Wales history, until the 2013 Miranda by-election which eclipsed it with a 26-point two-party swing against the Liberal/National government. [9]

Key dates

Campaign

The Labor Party launched their campaign on 5 February 2011 [11] in Liverpool within the electoral district of Macquarie Fields. [12] Premier Keneally launched the Labor Party's campaign slogan "Protecting jobs – Supporting families". In attendance for the launch were former Prime Minister Bob Hawke and former Premiers Wran and Carr.

The Liberal and Nationals Coalition launched their campaign on 20 February 2011 at the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre in Penrith within the electoral district of Penrith with the slogan: "Real Change for NSW". In attendance for the launch were both Liberal and Nationals Leaders O'Farrell and Stoner as well as federal Liberal Party leader Tony Abbott, former Liberal Premiers and Leaders Greiner, Fahey, and Chikarovski. [13]

The Coalition had been leading in opinion polling for almost three years, and were unbackable favourites throughout the campaign to win the election. The final Newspoll had support for Labor at an all-time low with 23 percent of the primary vote and 35.9 percent of the two-party vote. Bookmakers were paying $1.01 for a Coalition win with Labor getting as much as $36 and one agency even paid out the winnings and declared the winner a week earlier. [14] At one point, Labor was widely predicted to win as few as 13 seats, seven less than the actual result. [15] According to several pollsters, Labor was in danger of losing several seats where it had not been seriously threatened in decades, as well as several that it had held for a century or more. Indeed, there were concerns that Labor would not win enough seats to form a credible shadow cabinet.

Resulting parliament

The Liberal/National Coalition won the largest proportional number of seats in NSW state history with 69 of 93 seats in the lower house (74.2 percent of the chamber)—in contrast, Labor won 69 of 99 seats (69.7 percent of the chamber) at Neville Wran's second "Wranslide" in 1981 election. Labor won 20 seats, the lowest for Labor in NSW Parliament in over a century, and the worst defeat that a sitting government in NSW has ever suffered. Many prominent Labor MPs and ministers lost their seats including Verity Firth, David Borger, Matt Brown, Jodi McKay, Virginia Judge, Phil Costa and Kevin Greene. [16] In the process, the Coalition took dozens of seats in areas considered Labor heartland, such as western Sydney and the Upper Hunter—some on swings of well over 10 per cent. The Liberals actually won 51 seats, enough for a majority in their own right—the first time the main non-Labor party in the state had achieved this since adopting the Liberal banner in 1945. Although O'Farrell thus had no need for the support of the Nationals, he opted to retain the Coalition.

In the upper house however, where half of the chamber was up for election, the landslide was not enough to deliver a Coalition majority. Three additional votes outside of the Liberal/National Coalition were required to pass legislation. The balance of power shifted from the Greens to the Shooters and Fishers Party and Christian Democratic Party. With two seats each held by the latter two parties, both needed to give legislative support if Labor and the Greens opposed legislation. [4] [5]

Retiring members

Where a Member of the Legislative Assembly or Legislative Council did not renominate to contest the election, their term ended at the dissolution of the parliament. Members who confirmed their retirement were:

Legislative Assembly

Legislative Council

Labor (4)

Greens (1)

Polling

Newspoll polling is conducted via random telephone number selection in city and country areas. Sampling sizes consist of around 1200–1300 electors. The declared margin of error is ±3 percentage points.

Better Premier ratings
DateLabor
Keneally
Liberal
O'Farrell
Uncommitted
2011 election
21–24 March 201132%48%20%
9–11 March 201135%48%17%
Jan–Feb 201132%47%21%
Nov–Dec 201035%40%25%
Sep–Oct 201035%42%23%
Jul–Aug 201039%39%22%
May–Jun 201044%36%20%
Mar–Apr 201045%30%25%
Jan–Feb 201040%31%29%
Nov–Dec 200935%34%31%
Sep–Oct 200931%236%33%
Jul–Aug 200932%233%35%
May–Jun 200933%232%35%
Mar–Apr 200933%231%36%
Jan–Feb 200934%229%37%
Nov–Dec 200830%233%37%
Sep–Oct 200835%228%37%
Jul–Aug 200832%139%29%
May–Jun 200832%139%29%
Mar–Apr 200836%133%31%
Jan–Mar 200837%130%33%
2007 election
Polling conducted by Newspoll and published in The Australian .
1 Morris Iemma, 2 Nathan Rees
Legislative Assembly opinion polling
Primary vote 2PP vote
DateALPLIBNATGRNOTHALPL/NP
2011 election25.6%38.6%12.6%10.3%13.0%35.8%64.2%
21–24 March 201123%41%9%12%15%35.9%64.1%
9–11 March 201126%43%7%11%13%37%63%
Jan–Feb 201123%40%6%17%14%38%62%
Nov–Dec 201024%40%5%15%16%39%61%
Sep–Oct 201023%41%5%17%14%37%63%
Jul–Aug 201025%41%5%14%15%39%61%
May–Jun 201025%41%5%16%12%39%61%
Mar– Apr 201031%37%5%14%13%45%55%
Jan–Feb 201030%39%3%12%14%43%57%
Nov–Dec 200926%39%5%17%13%41%59%
Sep–Oct 200930%36%6%12%16%45%55%
Jul–Aug 200932%37%4%14%13%46%54%
May–Jun 200931%36%5%14%14%45%55%
Mar–Apr 200933%36%4%13%14%47%53%
Jan–Feb 200930%38%4%15%13%44%56%
Nov–Dec 200826%38%5%14%17%41%59%
Sep – Oct 200829%38%4%11%18%44%56%
Jul–Aug 200833%36%4%13%14%48%52%
May–Jun 200832%36%5%13%14%48%52%
Mar–Apr 200835%35%3%14%13%51%49%
Jan–Mar 200834%34%5%14%13%50%50%
2007 election 39.0%26.9%10.1%9.0%15.0%52.3%47.7%
Polling conducted by Newspoll and published in The Australian .

Newspaper endorsements

NewspaperEndorsement
The Australian Liberal [17]
The Australian Financial Review Liberal [ citation needed ]
Newcastle Herald Liberal [ citation needed ]
The Daily Telegraph Liberal [18]
The Sydney Morning Herald Liberal [19]

See also

Related Research Articles

Morris Iemma Australian politician and Former Premier of New South Wales

Morris Iemma is a former Australian politician who was the 40th Premier of New South Wales. He served from 3 August 2005 to 5 September 2008. From Sydney, Iemma attended the University of Sydney and the University of Technology, Sydney. A member of the Labor Party, he was first elected to the Parliament of New South Wales at the 1991 state election, having previously worked as a trade union official. From 1999, Iemma was a minister in the third and fourth ministries led by Bob Carr. He replaced Carr as premier and Leader of the New South Wales Labor Party in 2005, following Carr's resignation. Iemma led Labor to victory at the 2007 state election, albeit with a slightly reduced majority. He resigned as premier in 2008, after losing the support of caucus, and left parliament shortly after, triggering a by-election. He was replaced as premier by Nathan Rees.

Barry OFarrell 43rd Premier of New South Wales and Minister for Western Sydney, 2011–2014

Barry Robert O'Farrell is a former Australian politician who is Australia's High Commissioner to India since May 2020. O'Farrell was the 43rd Premier of New South Wales and Minister for Western Sydney from 2011 to 2014. He was the Leader of the New South Wales Liberal Party from 2007 to 2014, and was a Member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1995 to 2015, representing Northcott until 1999 and representing Ku-ring-gai on the Upper North Shore of Sydney from 1999 to 2015. He is currently President and Independent Board Chair of Diabetes Australia, Chair of the Wests Tigers Rugby League Football Club and CEO of Racing Australia Ltd.

Electoral district of Miranda

Miranda is an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales. It is represented by Eleni Petinos of the Liberal Party.

Kristina Keneally Australian politician

Kristina Kerscher Keneally is an Australian politician who has been a Senator for New South Wales since February 2018, representing the Labor Party. Since 2019, she has served as Deputy Leader of the Opposition in the Senate, Shadow Minister for Home Affairs, and Shadow Minister for Immigration and Citizenship. She previously served as Premier of New South Wales from 2009 to 2011, the first woman to hold the position.

Gladys Berejiklian 45th Premier of New South Wales

Gladys Berejiklian is an Australian politician serving as the 45th and current Premier of New South Wales and the Leader of the New South Wales Liberal Party, offices which she assumed on 23 January 2017 following the resignation of Mike Baird. She has been a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly since 2003, representing the seat of Willoughby.

1991 New South Wales state election State election for New South Wales, Australia in March 1991

Elections to the 50th Parliament of New South Wales were held on Saturday 25 May 1991. All seats in the Legislative Assembly and half the seats in the Legislative Council were up for election. The Liberal-National Coalition government of Premier Nick Greiner, which enjoyed a considerable majority following their landslide win at the 1988 election, was seeking a second term in office against new Labor Opposition Leader Bob Carr.

Jillian Skinner Australian politician

Jillian Gell Skinner, an Australian politician, was the New South Wales Minister for Health in the Baird government. Skinner was a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly representing North Shore for the Liberal Party from 1994 to 2017 and was the Deputy Leader of the New South Wales Liberal Party from 2007 to 2014. Between 2011 and 2015 Skinner also served as the Minister for Medical Research. On 27 January 2017, Skinner announced her intention to resign from the ministry and from Parliament.

Members of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly who served in the 54th parliament held their seats from 2007 to 2011. They were elected at the 2007 state election, and at by-elections. The Speaker was Richard Torbay.</ref>

2008 Ryde state by-election

A by-election was held for the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Ryde on 18 October 2008 to coincide with the Port Macquarie, Lakemba and Cabramatta by-elections. The by-election was triggered by the resignation of sitting member and Deputy Premier John Watkins, who cited exhaustion and the lack of time spent with his family for his resignation. Watkins resigned as Deputy Premier and Minister for Transport and retired from parliament on 8 September 2008, prompting a Cabinet reshuffle.

2008 Lakemba state by-election election result for Lakemba, New South Wales, Australia

A by-election was held for the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Lakemba on 18 October 2008 after former Premier Morris Iemma resigned as member for Lakemba. By-elections for the seats of Cabramatta, Port Macquarie and Ryde were held on the same day.

2008 Cabramatta state by-election

A by-election was held for the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Cabramatta on 18 October 2008 to coincide with the Lakemba, Port Macquarie and Ryde by-elections. The Cabramatta by-election was triggered by the resignation of sitting member and former Health Minister Reba Meagher, after a spectacular series of events that saw both the Deputy Premier and the Premier resign.

Victor Dominello Australian politician (born 1967)

Victor Michael Dominello, an Australian politician, is the New South Wales Minister for Customer Service in the second Berejiklian ministry since April 2019. Dominello is a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, representing the electorate of Ryde for the Liberal Party since 2008.

2010 Penrith state by-election

A by-election was held for the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Penrith on 19 June 2010. The by-election was triggered by the resignation of sitting Labor member and former Parliamentary Secretary for Education and Training Karyn Paluzzano, who had lied to an Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) inquiry over her actions, such as signing false staff payslips and rorting her electoral mail allowance. Paluzzano resigned from Cabinet after she admitted lying to ICAC. Paluzzano resigned from Parliament on 7 May 2010, hours after being suspended from the Labor Party.

1950 New South Wales state election State election for New South Wales, Australia in June 1950

The 1950 New South Wales state election was held on 17 June 1950. It was conducted in single member constituencies with compulsory preferential voting and was held on boundaries created at a 1949 redistribution. The election was for all of the 94 seats in the Legislative Assembly, which was an increase of 4 seats since the previous election.

Stuart Ayres Australian politician (born 1980)

Stuart Laurence Ayres, an Australian politician, is the New South Wales Minister for Jobs, Investment, Tourism and Western Sydney in the second Berejiklian ministry since April 2019. Ayres is a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly since 19 June 2010, representing the electorate of Penrith as a member of the Liberal Party.

Politics of New South Wales Overview of politics in New South Wales

New South Wales politics takes place in context of bicameral parliamentary system. The main parties are the Liberal and National parties of the governing Coalition and the Australian Labor Party. Other minor political parties include the Greens, Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party, the Christian Democratic Party, the One Nation, the Liberal Democratic Party and the Keep Sydney Open..

The O'Farrell ministry was the 93rd ministry of the Government of New South Wales, and was led by Barry O'Farrell, the state's 43rd Premier.

2015 New South Wales state election State election for New South Wales, Australia in March 2015

A general election for the 56th Parliament of New South Wales (NSW) was held on Saturday 28 March 2015. Members were elected to all 93 seats in the Legislative Assembly using optional preferential voting. Members were also elected to 21 of the 42 seats in the Legislative Council using optional preferential proportional representation voting. The election was conducted by the New South Wales Electoral Commission.

2013 Miranda state by-election election result for Miranda, New South Wales, Australia

A by-election for the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Miranda occurred on 19 October 2013. The by-election was triggered by the resignation of Graham Annesley (Liberal), which was announced on 28 August 2013. Barry Collier (Labor) won the seat with a 55 percent two-party vote from a 26-point two-party swing, the largest swing in New South Wales history.

2019 New South Wales state election State election for New South Wales, Australia in March 2019

The 2019 New South Wales state election was held on Saturday 23 March 2019 to elect the 57th Parliament of New South Wales, including all 93 seats in the Legislative Assembly and 21 of the 42 seats in the Legislative Council. The election was conducted by the New South Wales Electoral Commission (NSWEC).

References

  1. "Summary, NSW election 2011". ABC News . Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 27 March 2011. Retrieved 27 March 2011.
  2. "Party totals, NSW election 2011". ABC. 29 July 2010. Retrieved 16 April 2011.
  3. "NSW State Election 2011". Electoral Commission of New South Wales. 26 March 2011. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  4. 1 2 "Legislative Council, NSW election 2011". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 27 March 2011. Retrieved 27 March 2011.
  5. 1 2 "Upper House shift from left to right". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 27 March 2011. Retrieved 27 March 2011.
  6. "Pauline Hanson fails to win seat in NSW: SMH 12 April 2011". News.smh.com.au. 12 April 2011. Retrieved 16 April 2011.
  7. 1 2 3 "A turning point for the Libs". The Daily Telegraph. News Limited. 20 October 2008. Retrieved 20 May 2009.
  8. "Liar Paluzzano resigns from parliament". The Daily Telegraph. News Limited. Australian Associated Press. 7 May 2010. Retrieved 8 May 2010.
  9. "Libs claim victory in Penrith". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. AAP. 19 June 2010. Retrieved 19 June 2010.
  10. "Writs of Elections" (PDF). Government Gazette. Government of New South Wales. 5 March 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 May 2011. Retrieved 24 March 2011.
  11. Nicholls, Sean (4 February 2011). "NSW election campaign launch: Labor beats Coalition to the punch". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 20 February 2011.
  12. Salusinszky, Imre (12 February 2011). "Labor election strategy already failing the test". The Australian . News Limited. Retrieved 20 February 2011.
  13. "Coalition kicks off NSW election campaign". Telegraph — News Ltd. 20 February 2011. Retrieved 25 March 2011.
  14. "Labor steels itself for disaster with day to go". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. 20 February 2011. Retrieved 25 March 2011.
  15. "NSW Labor may only win 13 seats: ABC PM 25 March 2011". Abc.net.au. 25 March 2011. Retrieved 16 April 2011.
  16. "Avoid scandals, O'Farrell tells his MPs". News.smh.com.au. 30 March 2011. Retrieved 16 April 2011.
  17. "NSW must emerge from Labor's heart of darkness". The Australian. News Limited. 25 March 2011. Retrieved 28 March 2011.
  18. "It's time for a state cleanout". The Daily Telegraph. News Limited. 25 March 2011. Retrieved 28 March 2011.
  19. "NSW is overdue for change and renewal". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. 25 March 2011. Retrieved 28 March 2011.