2013 Rugby World Cup Sevens

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2013 Rugby World Cup Sevens
Семерки чемпионата мира по регби-2013
2013 Rugby World Cup Sevens logo.png
Tournament details
Host nationFlag of Russia.svg  Russia
Venue
Dates28 – 30 June 2013
No. of nations
  • 24 (men)
  • 16 (women)
Champions  Gold medal blank.svg
2009
2018

The 2013 Rugby World Cup Sevens was the sixth edition of the Rugby World Cup Sevens. The tournament was held at Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia. [1] [2] New Zealand won the tournament, defeating England 33–0 in the final. Attendance for the tournament was poor, with matches played in mostly empty stadiums. [3] [4]

Contents

World Rugby, then known as the International Rugby Board (IRB), initially stated that the Rugby World Cup Sevens would be scrapped if rugby sevens were to be included in the Olympic programme for the 2016 Summer Olympics. As the International Olympic Committee voted for the sport's inclusion, [5] this was thought likely to be the last edition of the tournament. However, the IRB clarified that in June 2013, the tournament would be retained and held quadrennially from 2018. [6]

Hosting

In December 2009, the IRB confirmed that the governing rugby boards of Brazil (Brazilian Rugby Association), Germany (German Rugby Federation) and Russia (Rugby Union of Russia) formally expressed their intention to tender to host the tournament. [7] Scottish Rugby Union, the governing rugby board of Scotland, which did not choose to express interest, was also previously considering bidding for the tournament. [8]

In February 2010, the IRB reported that Rugby Union of Russia had formally submitted its tender for the right to host Rugby World Cup Sevens 2013, while the Brazilian and German rugby boards had confirmed their withdrawal from the bidding process. This announcement left Russia as the only country bidding to host the event. [9]

"This tender submission underlines our continued commitment to ignite a new Rugby frontier in Russia through a strategic vision of promotion, participation and growth."

—Vyacheslav Kopiev, President of Rugby Union of Russia [9]

Six days before hosting the 2010 IRB Junior World Rugby Trophy, Russia was officially named as host at the IRB annual congress on 12 May 2010. [2]

Qualification

Men's
RegionAutomatic QualifiersPlaces Remaining
Africa2
North America/CaribbeanNo Automatic Qualifiers2
South America1
AsiaNo Automatic Qualifiers3
Europe5
Oceania2
Women's
RegionAutomatic QualifiersPlaces Remaining
Africa1
North America/Caribbean1
South AmericaNo Automatic Qualifiers1
AsiaNo Automatic Qualifiers2.5*
Europe5
Oceania0.5*

* Winner of Oceania qualifier will compete in Asian qualifier.

Notes (Men's):
Canada and United States qualified for the tournament taking the 2 available places in the North America/Caribbean category.
Zimbabwe and Tunisia qualified for the tournament taking the 2 available places in the Africa category.
Australia and Tonga qualified for the tournament taking the 2 available places in the Oceania category.
Portugal, Spain, France, Georgia and Scotland qualified for the tournament taking the 5 available places in the Europe category.
Japan, Hong Kong and Philippines qualified for the tournament taking the 3 available places in the Asia category.
Uruguay qualified for the tournament taking the 1 and only place available in the South America category.

Notes (Women's):
Canada qualified for the tournament through NACRA's regional qualifying tournament taking the 1 and only place available in the North America/Caribbean category.
Tunisia qualified for the tournament taking the 1 available place in the Africa category.
England, Ireland, Spain, France and Netherlands qualified for the tournament taking the 5 available places in the European category.
Fiji, Japan, and China qualified for the tournament through AFRU's regional qualifying tournament taking the 3 available places in the Asian and Oceania category.
Brazil qualified through CONSUR's regional qualifying tournament taking the 1 and only place in the South America category.

Qualified teams

Men

AfricaNorth America/
Caribbean
South AmericaAsiaEuropeOceania
Automatic qualification
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina Flag of England.svg  England
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia (Hosts)
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales (Holders)
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa
Regional Qualifiers
Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay Flag of Hong Kong.svg  Hong Kong
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Flag of the Philippines.svg  Philippines
Flag of France.svg  France
Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga

Women

AfricaNorth America/
Caribbean
South AmericaAsiaEuropeOceania
Automatic qualification
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Flag of the United States.svg  United States Flag of Russia.svg  Russia (Hosts)Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia (Holders)
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
Regional Qualifiers
Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Flag of England.svg  England
Flag of France.svg  France
IRFU flag.svg  Ireland
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji

Men

Women

Trophy Overview

Trophy Overview
MenWomen
ChampionsRunner-upChampionsRunner-up
Cup Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Flag of England.svg  England Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Plate Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Flag of England.svg  England
Bowl Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands

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References

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  3. "Poor crowds for Rugby World Cup Sevens fail to dampen enthusiasm", ESPN, July 2, 2013.
  4. "IRB optimistic despite poor crowds in Russia", Business Day, July 2, 2013.
  5. "Golf & rugby set to join Olympics". BBC. 13 August 2009. Retrieved 20 December 2009.
  6. "Future of Rugby World Cup Sevens confirmed". IRB. 13 June 2013. Archived from the original on 2013-08-14. Retrieved 13 June 2013.
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