2014 Summer Youth Olympics

Last updated

Games of the II Youth Olympiad
Nanjing Youth Olympics 2014.svg
Host city Nanjing, China
MottoShare the Games, Share our dreams
(Chinese :分享青春, 共筑未来; pinyin :Fēnxiǎng qīngchūn, gòng zhù wèilái; lit. 'Share our youth, build our future together')
Nations203
Athletes3,579
Events222 in 28 sports
Opening16 August
Closing28 August
Opened by
Cauldron
Stadium Nanjing Olympic Sports Centre
Summer

The 2014 Summer Youth Olympics (Chinese :2014年夏季青年奧林匹克运动会; pinyin :Èr líng yī sì Nián Xiàjì Qīngnián Àolínpǐkè Yùndònghuì), officially known as the II Summer Youth Olympic Games Chinese :第二届夏季青年奧林匹克运动会; pinyin :Dì'èrjiè Xiàjì Qīngnián Àolínpǐkè Yùndònghuì, and commonly known as Nanjing 2014 (Chinese :南京2014; pinyin :Nánjīng Èr Líng yī sì), were the second Summer Youth Olympic Games, an international sports, education and cultural festival for teenagers, held from 16 to 28 August 2014 in Nanjing, China. These were the first Youth Olympic Games held in China, making it the first country to host both regular and Youth Olympics following the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing.

Contents

Bidding process

The International Olympic Committee established the Youth Olympic Games in July 2007. [2] The 2014 host city was elected on 10 February 2010, during the 2010 IOC Session in Vancouver. This was the first election of a Youth Olympic Games host city held in an IOC Session. The elections for the host cities of the 2010 Summer Youth Olympics and 2012 Winter Youth Olympics were done through postal votes by IOC members.

2014 Summer Youth Olympics bidding results
CityNationVotes
Nanjing Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China47
Poznań Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 42

Like other Olympic events, the 2014 Summer Youth Games has its own logo. [5] The logo consists of three parts. The colorful "NANJING" reflects the image of the gate of Nanjing and the features of some Jiangnan houses. The various colors symbolize youths' energetic spirit.

Venues

All of the venues are located in four zones within Nanjing. [6] All venues with the exception of the cycling road, sailing, and triathlon venues, were temporary. [7]

The Nanjing Olympic Sports Center hosted the opening and closing ceremonies.

District VenueImageSportsCapacity
Gulou Longjiang Gymnasium Judo, Wrestling
Wutaishan Sports Center Wutaishan Sports Center in Nanjing 2012-09.JPG Basketball, Football, Table tennis
Jiangning Fangshan Sports Training Base Archery, Shooting
Jiangning Sports Center Football, Handball
Jinniu Lake Sailing Venue Sailing
Jianye Nanjing International Expo Center Nan Jing Guo Ji Bo Lan Zhong Xin .jpg Boxing, Fencing, Modern Pentathlon, Taekwondo, Weightlifting
Nanjing Olympic Sports Center Nanjing Olympic Sports Center main gym.jpg Aquatics, Athletics, Gymnastics, Modern Pentathlon60,000
Pukou Laoshan National Forest Park Cycling
Youth Olympic Sports Park Beach Volleyball, Cycling, Field Hockey, Rugby Sevens
Xuanwu Nanjing Sport Institute Former Central Stadium in Nanjing 2011-12.JPG Badminton, Tennis
Xinzhuang Equestrian Venue, generally known as the Nanjing International Exhibition Center Equestrian
Xuanwu Lake Park Xuanwulake boulder.jpg Triathlon
Xuanwu Lake Rowing-Canoeing Venue Canoeing, Rowing
Zhongshan International Golf Club Golf

Torch relay

The Youth Olympic torch was designed by the Vatti Corporation Ltd. The torch is known as the "Gate of Happiness." A structure resembling a city gate is found on the top part of the torch and the blue color of the torch represents the peaceful tranquility of Nanjing. The Yangtze which flows next to Nanjing is presented as stripes found on the handle of the torch. It is said that the torch is capable of resisting wind speeds of 11 m/s, rainfall of 50mm/h, altitude of up to 4500m and a temperature range of -15˚C to 45˚C. [8]

Following Olympic tradition the torch lighting ceremony was held on 30 April 2014 in Athens, Greece at the Panathenaic Stadium where the first Olympic Games were held. Four young athletes from Greece and China competed in a mini-relay.

The torch relay was divided into two parts. The first part was a digital relay where people who downloaded an app were able to participate in the relay through an interactive option called "Give Me Fire." When using this feature users were able to pass the Youth Olympic flame to their friends by touching their devices together. The relay visited 258 different online locations from the 204 participating NOCs over a 98-day period. [9]

After the digital relay the relay began its physical portion in Nanjing where a 10-day relay was held. [10] 104 torch bearers carried the torch singularly or in pairs over 100 legs. Torch bearers were primarily focused on youth and included individuals from sport, culture, media, volunteers and the International Olympic Committee. Notable torch bearers included two time badminton Olympian gold medalist Lin Dan, 2008 Olympic fencing gold medalist Zhong Man, director Chen Weiya and composer Bian Liunian. [11]

Sports

222 events, there will be 13 mixed team events (Mixed-NOCs), 4 mixed team events (NOCs), 1 open event (Equestrian), 109 men's events, and 95 women's events. This is a tentative list of the sports program taken from the general presentation of the 2nd Summer Youth Olympic Games in 2014. [12] Golf and Rugby sevens will be contested for the first time. Beach volleyball will replace indoor volleyball and other format changes to sports like field hockey which introduced a five a side format. New events have also been introduced in some of the sports including a shooting mixed gender event among others. [13]

Demonstration sports

These were the demonstration sports in the games: [14]

Medal table

The NYOGOC did not keep an official medal tally. The ranking in this table is based on information provided by the IOC and is consistent with IOC convention in its published medal tables. For the full medal table, refer to the main article.

Medals won by teams with athletes from more than one National Olympic Committee are included in the table as medals awarded to a mixed-NOCs team. There were eight events which composed entirely of mixed-NOCs teams, and as such all 25 medals in these events, including two bronzes in judo, were swept by mixed-NOCs teams. The remaining medals were won in events which combined mixed-NOCs teams and teams representing one NOC. The mixed-NOCs listing is not given a ranking.

Alongside the mixed-NOCs teams, the top ten ranked NOCs are listed below. China (highlighted), as host nation, is also included in the table.

  *   Host nation (China)

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China*38131465
2Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 27191157
Olympic flag.svg  Mixed-NOCs 13121439
3Flag of the United States.svg  United States 105722
4Flag of France.svg  France 83920
5Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 79521
6Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 78823
7Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 78621
8Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 661123
9Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 66113
10Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 56112
11–87 Remaining 90125153368
Totals (87 entries)224220240684
Source: IOC

Calendar

All dates are BJT (UTC+8)

222 events are expected to be held over the 2014 Youth Olympics. The schedule will be finalized as the event becomes closer. [15]

  Opening ceremony  Event competitions  Event finals  Closing ceremony
August14th
Thu
15th
Fri
16th
Sat
17th
Sun
18th
Mon
19th
Tue
20th
Wed
21st
Thu
22nd
Fri
23rd
Sat
24th
Sun
25th
Mon
26th
Tue
27th
Wed
28th
Thu
Events
Ceremonies
Aquatics (Diving) 111115
Aquatics (Swimming) 38574936
Archery 1113
Athletics 131211137
Badminton 33
Basketball 224
Beach volleyball 112
Boxing 31013
Canoeing 448
Cycling 213
Equestrian 112
Fencing 22217
Field hockey 112
Football 112
Golf 213
Gymnastics 111155216
Handball 22
Judo 33219
Modern pentathlon 1113
Rowing 44
Rugby sevens 22
Sailing 44
Shooting 1111116
Table tennis 213
Taekwondo 2222210
Tennis 235
Triathlon 1113
Weightlifting 22222111
Wrestling 54514
Total gold medals1419152116182829201725222
Cumulative gold medals1433486985103131160180197222
August14th
Thu
15th
Fri
16th
Sat
17th
Sun
18th
Mon
19th
Tue
20th
Wed
21st
Thu
22nd
Fri
23rd
Sat
24th
Sun
25th
Mon
26th
Tue
27th
Wed
28th
Thu
Events

Participating nations

203 out of the 204 National Olympic Committees recognized at that time sent delegates to Nanjing. Among them, both Sierra Leone and Nigeria were planning to participate, but on 13 August 2014 both nations pulled out due to pressure from Chinese Authorities in an attempt to prevent Ebola from West Africa from entering their nation. [16] On 15 August 2014 Liberia also withdrew along with two athletes from Guinea being barred by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) due to fears that the nature of their sports (judo and swimming) could pose a risk to other athletes. [17] An athlete from South Sudan competed under the Olympic flag as they did not have a National Olympic Committee. [18] The ten nations with the most athletes are China (with 123), Brazil (with 97), United States (with 92), Australia (with 89), Russia (with 88), Germany (with 85), Egypt (with 83), France (with 82), Japan (with 78), and Mexico (with 78).

Participating National Olympic Committees

Cultural and education program

Youth Olympic Games incorporate a Cultural and Education Program, featuring a variety of cultural and educational activities for young people. Youth Olympics include educational experience based on Olympic values that promote healthy lifestyles and allow young athletes to become well-rounded people with "true sporting spirits." [2] Well-known athletes and "international specialists" guide the young participants. The program combines "Olympic traditions (such as the torch relay) with diverse cultures to spread the Olympic spirit." [2]

Athlete role models

On 17 March 2014 37 athletes from the 28 Olympic sports were chosen by the IOC to be role models at the 2014 Youth Olympics. The athletes will offer support, mentor and advice to the participating youth Olympians. As an athlete role model they will take part in activities and workshops on healthy lifestyles, social responsibility and Olympism. They will also take part in informal chats known as "chat with champions." [19] [20] On 9 April 2014 and 22 April 2014 footballer Simone Farina and swimmer Patrick Murphy were appointed as the 38th and 39th Athlete Role Model respectively. [21] [22]

Young ambassadors

A total of 104 people were selected by their National Olympic Committee to be young ambassadors. Young Ambassadors are aged between 18 and 25 and are athletes, coaches, students or young professionals that demonstrate the Olympic values and inspire and empower young people to do the same. [23]

The main roles of the Young Ambassadors is to promote the Youth Olympics in their nations and to encourage athletes of their nations to get the most out of the Youth Olympic experience by encouraging them to interact with people from different sports and cultures and to take part in activities and workshops. [24]

A seminar has held from 25 to 28 March 2014 in order to prepare the ambassadors for the Youth Olympics by teaching them about the cultures and activities Nanjing has to offer. [25]

Controversies

Isolation of Nigerian athletes in the Games

Following the 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak, Chinese officials quarantined and isolated all Nigerian athletes from all sporting facilities despite all testing negative to Ebola before the games. The Nigerian Olympic committee reacted to the discrimination by withdrawing all its athletes from the games. [26] [27] [28]

Doping

One unnamed taekwondo athlete had been disqualified from competing at the Youth Olympics after testing positive for the banned diuretic furosemide. The information was released on 5 November 2014. [29]

See also

Notes

  1. IOC records state Xi Jinping opened the Nanjing Games as "President", de jure head of state. Though Xi Jinping was also de facto ruler as General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, that title is not reflected in IOC records.

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Youth Olympic Games</span> International multi-sport event

The Youth Olympic Games (YOG) is an international multi-sport event for athletes between 15 and 18 years old, organized by the International Olympic Committee. The games are held every four years in staggered summer and winter events consistent with the current Olympic Games format, though in reverse order with Olympic Winter Games held in leap years instead of Summer Olympic Games. The first summer version was held in Singapore from 14 to 26 August 2010 while the first winter version was held in Innsbruck, Austria from 13 to 22 January 2012.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2010 Summer Youth Olympics</span> 2010 edition of the Summer Youth Olympics

The 2010 Summer Youth Olympics, officially known as the I Summer Youth Olympic Games, and commonly known as Singapore 2010, was the inaugural edition of the Youth Olympic Games (YOG), an Olympic Games-based event for young athletes. Held in Singapore from 14 to 26 August 2010, it was the first International Olympic Committee–sanctioned event held in Southeast Asia. The Games featured about 3,600 athletes aged 14–18 from 204 nations, who competed in 201 events in 26 sports. No official medal tables were published, but the most successful nation was China, followed by Russia; hosts Singapore did not win any gold medals. Most unique features of the YOG, such as mixed-NOCs teams and the Culture and Education Programme (CEP), made their debut at the 2010 Games.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2012 Winter Youth Olympics</span>

The 2012 Winter Youth Olympic Games, officially known as the I Winter Youth Olympic Games (YOG), were an international multi-sport event for youths that took place in Innsbruck, Austria, on 13–22 January 2012. They were the inaugural Winter Youth Olympics, a major sports and cultural festival celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games. Approximately 1100 athletes from 70 countries competed. The decision for Innsbruck to host the Games was announced on 12 December 2008 after mail voting by 105 International Olympic Committee (IOC) members. Innsbruck is the first city to host three winter Olympic events, having previously hosted the 1964 Winter Olympics and the 1976 Winter Olympics.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2018 Summer Youth Olympics</span> 2018 edition of the Summer Youth Olympics

The 2018 Summer Youth Olympics, officially known as the III Summer Youth Olympic Games, and commonly known as Buenos Aires 2018, were an international sports, cultural, and educational event held from 6 to 18 October 2018 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. They were the first Youth Olympic Games held outside of Eurasia, and the first Summer Games held outside of Asia and the first to be held in the Western and Southern hemispheres. It was the second Olympic Games held in South America after the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Philippines at the Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

The Philippines first participated at the Youth Olympic Games at the inaugural 2010 Games. Philippines have participated in every edition of Summer Youth Olympics and two editions of the Winter Youth Olympics, the 2012 and 2020 Games.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Serbia at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

Serbia competed at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, in Nanjing, China from 16 August to 28 August 2014. The Olympic Committee of Serbia confirmed that the country will be represented by 24 athletes in 12 sports. The Serbian flag at the opening ceremony was carried by tennis player Ivana Jorović.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">El Salvador at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

El Salvador competed at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, in Nanjing, China from 16 August to 28 August 2014.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Canada at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

Canada competed at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, in Nanjing, China from 16 August to 28 August 2014. Field hockey Olympian Sandra Levy was chosen to be the nation's chef de mission. The Canadian team consists of 75 athletes in 19 sports.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Chile at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

Chile competed at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, in Nanjing, China from 16 August to 28 August 2014.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Denmark at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

Denmark competed at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, in Nanjing, China from 16 August to 28 August 2014.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Greece at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

Greece competed at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, in Nanjing, China from 16 August to 28 August 2014.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hong Kong at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

Hong Kong competed at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, in Nanjing, China from 16 August to 28 August 2014.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Portugal at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

Portugal was represented at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, held in Nanjing, China, from 16 to 28 August 2014, with a delegation of 21 competitors, who took part in 10 events.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sierra Leone at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

Sierra Leone was planning to participate at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, in Nanjing, China, but on 13 August 2014 they pulled out of the games due to pressure from Chinese Authorities in an attempt to prevent Ebola from West Africa from entering their nation.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Guinea at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

Guinea competed at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, in Nanjing, China from 16 August to 28 August 2014.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Italy at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span> Sporting event delegation

Italy competed at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, in Nanjing, China from 16 August to 28 August 2014.

The 2014 Summer Youth Olympics medal table is a list of National Olympic Committees (NOCs) ranked by the number of gold medals won by their athletes during the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics, held in Nanjing, China, from 17 to 27 August 2014.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Mixed-NOCs at the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics</span>

Teams made up of athletes representing different National Olympic Committees (NOCs), called mixed-NOCs teams, participated in the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics. These teams participated in either events composed entirely of mixed-NOCs teams, or in events which saw the participation of mixed-NOCs teams and non-mixed-NOCs teams. When a mixed-NOCs team won a medal, the Olympic flag was raised rather than a national flag; if a mixed-NOCs team won gold, the Olympic anthem would be played instead of national anthems. A total of 17 events with Mixed NOCs were held.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2024 Winter Youth Olympics</span> 2024 edition of the Winter Youth Olympics

The 2024 Winter Youth Olympics, officially known as the IV Winter Youth Olympic Games and commonly known as Gangwon 2024, are an upcoming youth winter multi-sport event scheduled to be held between 19 January and 2 February 2024 in Gangwon Province, South Korea.

References

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  2. 1 2 3 "Nanjing 2014 World Youth Olympics". Olympic Council of Ireland. 28 August 2012. Retrieved 13 February 2014. The Youth Olympic Games (YOG) is an international multi-sport event held every four years. The event will follow the existing Olympic format of staggered summer and winter games. The idea for such an event was introduced by International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Jacques Rogge in 2001. On 5 July 2007, IOC members at the 119th IOC session in Guatemala City approved the creation of a youth version of the Olympic Games.
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  25. "104 Young Ambassadors Have Arrived!". Nanjing2014.org. 25 March 2014. Retrieved 28 March 2014.
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Preceded by Summer Youth Olympic Games
Nanjing

II Youth Olympiad (2014)
Succeeded by