2014 Tour de France, Stage 12 to Stage 21

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The 2014 Tour de France was the 101st edition of the race, one of cycling's Grand Tours. It featured 22 cycling teams. The Tour started in Yorkshire, England on 5 July and finished on the Champs-Élysées in Paris on 27 July. [1] [2] [3]

2014 Tour de France 2014 edition of a multiple-stage bicycle race primarily held in France

The 2014 Tour de France was the 101st edition of the race, one of cycling's Grand Tours. The 3,660.5-kilometre (2,274.5 mi) race included 21 stages, starting in Leeds, Yorkshire, United Kingdom, on 5 July and finishing on the Champs-Élysées in Paris on 27 July. The race also visited Belgium for part of a stage. Vincenzo Nibali of the Astana team won the race by more than seven minutes, the biggest winning margin since 1997. Jean-Christophe Péraud placed second, with Thibaut Pinot (FDJ.fr) third.

In road bicycle racing, a Grand Tour is one of the three major European professional cycling stage races: Tour de France, Giro d'Italia and Vuelta a España. Collectively they are termed the Grand Tours, and all three races are similar in format being multi-week races with daily stages. They have a special status in the UCI regulations: more points for the UCI World Tour are distributed in Grand Tours than in other races, and they are the only stage races allowed to last longer than 14 days.

Cycling team organizational unit consisting of cyclists and carers

A cycling team is a group of cyclists who join a team or are acquired and train together to compete in bicycle races whether amateur or professional – and the supporting personnel. Cycling teams are most important in road bicycle racing, which is a team sport, but collaboration between team members is also important in track cycling and cyclo-cross.

Contents

Stage 12

17 July 2014 Bourg-en-Bresse to Saint-Étienne, 185.5 km (115 mi) [4]

This was a hilly stage which travelled from the department of Ain, into Rhône, with a brief incursion into Saône-et-Loire, and finished in Loire. The stage departed from Bourg-en-Bresse, heading west. The race officially started, on the outskirt of Bourg-en-Bresse, at Saint-Denis-lès-Bourg.

Ain Department of France

Ain is a department named after the Ain River on the eastern edge of France. It is part of the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region and bordered by the rivers Saône and Rhône.

Rhône (department) Department of France

Rhône is a French department located in the central Eastern region of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. It is named after the river Rhône.

Saône-et-Loire Department of France

Saône-et-Loire is a French department, named after the Saône and the Loire rivers between which it lies.

The race headed through Neuville-les-Dames and Saint-Didier-sur-Chalaronne, before travelling over the River Rhône to an intermediate sprint at Romanèche-Thorins. The race then turned south and headed into Villié-Morgon before passing through Régnié-Durette, over the Category 4 Col de Brouilly and through Odenas. The route continued south through Saint-Étienne-des-Oullières, Blacé, Saint-Julien and Cogny. Here, the route turned west to begin the climb of the Category 3 Côte du Saule d'Oingt at 551 m (1,808 ft) and then descended south into Oingt, itself. This was followed by Le Bois-d'Oingt and Le Breuil, before heading south-east through Chessy and Châtillon to Lozanne. The route turned, and continued south, through Lentilly and Pollionnay to Vaugneray. Then, the race again headed west to the Category 3 Col des Brosses  (fr ) at 867 m (2,844 ft), and descended south-west into Saint-Symphorien-sur-Coise. The route turned south, once again, headed over the Category 4 Côte de Grammond at 778 m (2,552 ft), and descended through Fontanès and Sorbiers into La Talaudière, before 8.5 km (5 mi) of relatively flat finish into Saint-Étienne.

Neuville-les-Dames Commune in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France

Neuville-les-Dames is a commune in the Ain department in eastern France.

Saint-Didier-sur-Chalaronne Commune in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France

Saint-Didier-sur-Chalaronne is a commune in the Ain department in eastern France.

Romanèche-Thorins Commune in Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, France

Romanèche-Thorins is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in the region of Bourgogne in eastern France.

Stage 12 result
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Norway.svg  Alexander Kristoff  (NOR) Team Katusha 4h 32' 11"
2Flag of Slovakia.svg  Peter Sagan  (SVK) Jersey green.svg Cannondale + 0"
3Flag of France.svg  Arnaud Démare  (FRA) FDJ.fr + 0"
4Flag of Switzerland.svg  Michael Albasini  (SUI) Orica–GreenEDGE + 0"
5Flag of Lithuania.svg  Ramūnas Navardauskas  (LTU) Garmin–Sharp + 0"
6Flag of Italy.svg  Daniele Bennati  (ITA) Tinkoff–Saxo + 0"
7Flag of France.svg  Bryan Coquard  (FRA) Team Europcar + 0"
8Flag of Italy.svg  Daniel Oss  (ITA) BMC Racing Team + 0"
9Flag of France.svg  Samuel Dumoulin  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 0"
10Flag of Spain.svg  José Joaquín Rojas  (ESP) Movistar Team + 0"
General classification after stage 12
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana 51h 31' 34"
2Flag of Australia.svg  Richie Porte  (AUS) Team Sky + 2' 23"
3Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 2' 47"
4Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey white.svg Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 3' 01"
5Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) FDJ.fr + 3' 47"
6Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 3' 56"
7Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 3' 57"
8Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 4' 08"
9Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Jurgen Van den Broeck  (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 4' 18"
10Flag of Denmark.svg  Jakob Fuglsang  (DEN) Astana + 4' 31"

Stage 13

18 July 2014 Saint-Étienne to Chamrousse, 197.5 km (123 mi) [5]

This was a high mountain stage which travelled from the department of Loire into Isère. The stage departed from Saint-Étienne, heading east. Racing officially started between Saint-Jean-Bonnefonds and Saint-Chamond.

Isère Department of France

Isère is a department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region in eastern France named after the river Isère.

Saint-Jean-Bonnefonds Commune in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France

Saint-Jean-Bonnefonds is a commune in the Loire department in central France.

Saint-Chamond, Loire Commune in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France

Saint-Chamond is a commune in the Loire department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region in central France. The town dates to the Roman period.

The race passed through Saint-Paul-en-Jarez, before the early climb of the Category 3 Col de la Croix de Montvieux at 812 m (2,664 ft). The race continued east, passing through Cheyssieu, Cour-et-Buis, La Côte-Saint-André to La Frette. The route turned south-east to Rives, south to Tullins and then east to Voreppe, as the race travelled alongside the River Isère into Saint-Égrève. From Saint-Égrève, the climb began to the summit of the Category 1 Col de Palaquit at 1,154 m (3,786 ft), with a 13.5 km (8 mi) descent south into Grenoble. Grenoble was quickly followed by an intermediate sprint at Saint-Martin-d'Hères before a short climb to Uriage-les-Bains. The first Hors catégorie climb of the tour then began, with a 20.5 km (13 mi) ascent to the finish at the ski resort of Chamrousse, at a height of 1,730 m (5,676 ft).

Saint-Paul-en-Jarez Commune in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France

Saint-Paul-en-Jarez is a commune in the Loire department in central France.

Cheyssieu Commune in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France

Cheyssieu is a commune in the Isère department in southeastern France.

Cour-et-Buis Commune in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France

Cour-et-Buis is a commune in the Isère department in southeastern France.

Before the start there was a minute of silence in memorial for the airplane crash Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. Many Dutch people were killed in this crash. Dutch teams and riders wore black ribbons or black armbands throughout the stage.

Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 downing of a Malaysian civilian airliner by a missile on 17 July 2014

Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 (MH17) was a scheduled passenger flight from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur that was shot down on 17 July 2014 while flying over eastern Ukraine, killing all 283 passengers and 15 crew on board. Contact with the aircraft, a Boeing 777-200ER, was lost when it was about 50 km (31 mi) from the Ukraine–Russia border and wreckage of the aircraft fell near Hrabove in Donetsk Oblast, Ukraine, 40 km (25 mi) from the border. The shoot-down occurred in the War in Donbass, during the Battle of Shakhtarsk, in an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels. The crash was Malaysia Airlines' second aircraft loss during 2014 after the disappearance of Flight 370 on 8 March.

A black ribbon is a symbol of remembrance or mourning.

Stage 13 result
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana 5h 12' 29"
2Flag of Poland.svg  Rafał Majka  (POL) Tinkoff–Saxo + 10"
3Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 11"
4Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 50"
5Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) FDJ.fr + 53"
6Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 1' 23"
7Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey white.svg Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 1' 23"
8Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Laurens ten Dam  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 1' 36"
9Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 2' 09"
10Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Fränk Schleck  (LUX) Trek Factory Racing + 2' 09"
General classification after stage 13
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Jersey polkadot.svg Astana 56h 44' 03"
2Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 3' 37"
3Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey white.svg Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 4' 24"
4Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) FDJ.fr + 4' 40"
5Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 5' 19"
6Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 6' 06"
7Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 6' 17"
8Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Jurgen Van den Broeck  (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 6' 27"
9Flag of Portugal.svg  Rui Costa  (POR) Lampre–Merida + 8' 35"
10Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 8' 36"

Stage 14

19 July 2014 Grenoble to Risoul, 177 km (110 mi) [6]

This was a high mountain stage which travelled from the department of Isère into Hautes-Alpes. The stage departed from Grenoble, heading south-east. Racing officially started after passing through Eybens.

The race travelled through Vizille before turning east and gradually climbing to the intermediate sprint at La Paute in the valley just north of Le Bourg-d'Oisans. The route then climbed up to Le Freney-d'Oisans before beginning the ascent of the Category 1 Col du Lautaret at 2,058 m (6,752 ft). The route passed through La Grave, halfway up the climb. From the summit of the climb, the race descended south-east through Le Monêtier-les-Bains and La Salle-les-Alpes to the valley floor at Briançon. The route then turned east to Cervières and began the ascent of the Hors catégorie Col d'Izoard, south from Cervières, at 2,360 m (7,743 ft), the highest point reached in the 2014 Tour. From the summit, the race descended 29 km (18 mi) through Arvieux and along the valley south-east, south and then south-west to Guillestre and Risoul. The final climb of the day was the Category 1 hairpin ascent, to the ski station south of Risoul, at 1,855 m (6,086 ft).

Stage 14 result
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Poland.svg  Rafał Majka  (POL) Tinkoff–Saxo 5h 08' 27"
2Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana + 24"
3Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 26"
4Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) FDJ.fr + 50"
5Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey white.svg Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 50"
6Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 54"
7Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Fränk Schleck  (LUX) Trek Factory Racing + 1' 01"
8Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Laurens ten Dam  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 1' 07"
9Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 1' 20"
10Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 24"
General classification after stage 14
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana 61h 52' 54"
2Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 4' 37"
3Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey white.svg Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 4' 50"
4Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) FDJ.fr + 5' 06"
5Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 5' 49"
6Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 6' 08"
7Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 8' 33"
8Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 9' 32"
9Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Laurens ten Dam  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 10' 01"
10Flag of France.svg  Pierre Rolland  (FRA) Team Europcar + 10' 48"

Stage 15

20 July 2014 Tallard to Nîmes, 222 km (138 mi) [7]
The two-men breakaway, Jack Bauer (left) and Martin Elmiger, who would be caught 50m before the finish Tour de France 2014 - etape 15 - Rustrel - echappee 9.jpg
The two-men breakaway, Jack Bauer (left) and Martin Elmiger, who would be caught 50m before the finish

This was an undulating stage which travelled from the department of Hautes-Alpes, through Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Vaucluse and Bouches-du-Rhône, to Gard. The stage departed from Tallard, heading south-west. Racing officially began on the outskirt of the town.

The race headed south-west to Thèze and then south through Sisteron and Châteauneuf-Val-Saint-Donat. Here, the route turned west to Saint-Étienne-les-Orgues and then followed an indirect route west to Banon. The route descended from Banon, heading south and then west to Saint-Saturnin-lès-Apt. The westerly route continued through Cavaillon to an intermediate sprint at La Galine (Saint-Rémy-de-Provence). The race continued to Tarascon and across the River Rhône to Beaucaire. From Beaucaire, there was a further 28 km (17 mi) to ride, west to the finish at Nîmes.

Stage 15 result
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Norway.svg  Alexander Kristoff  (NOR) Team Katusha 4h 56' 43"
2Flag of Australia.svg  Heinrich Haussler  (AUS) IAM Cycling + 0"
3Flag of Slovakia.svg  Peter Sagan  (SVK) Jersey green.svg Cannondale + 0"
4Flag of Germany.svg  André Greipel  (GER) Lotto–Belisol + 0"
5Flag of Australia.svg  Mark Renshaw  (AUS) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step + 0"
6Flag of France.svg  Bryan Coquard  (FRA) Team Europcar + 0"
7Flag of Lithuania.svg  Ramūnas Navardauskas  (LTU) Garmin–Sharp + 0"
8Flag of France.svg  Romain Feillu  (FRA) Bretagne–Séché Environnement + 0"
9Flag of Switzerland.svg  Michael Albasini  (SUI) Orica–GreenEDGE + 0"
10Flag of New Zealand.svg  Jack Bauer  (NZL) Garmin–Sharp + 0"
General classification after stage 15
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana 66h 49' 37"
2Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 4' 37"
3Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey white.svg Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 4' 50"
4Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) FDJ.fr + 5' 06"
5Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 5' 49"
6Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 6' 08"
7Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 8' 33"
8Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 9' 32"
9Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Laurens ten Dam  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 10' 01"
10Flag of France.svg  Pierre Rolland  (FRA) Team Europcar + 10' 48"

Stage 16

22 July 2014 Carcassonne to Bagnères-de-Luchon, 237.5 km (148 mi) [8]

After the rest day in Carcassonne, [9] this was a high mountain stage which travelled from the department of Aude, through Ariège, Haute-Garonne and Hautes-Pyrénées, before finishing back in Haute-Garonne. The stage departed west from Carcassonne, with racing officially starting as the route passed Carcassonne Airport.

The route passed through Montréal and La Force before climbing the Category 4 Côte de Fanjeaux at 348 m (1,142 ft). The race then travelled through Belpech and Pamiers, before climbing the Category 4 Côte de Pamiers at 418 m (1,371 ft). The route continued west to Pailhes. The route then turned south-west through Sabarat, Le Mas-d'Azil, Clermont and Lescure to an intermediate sprint at Saint-Girons. From here, the race continued to Moulis and Audressein, before turning west to Argein, Orgibet and Saint-Lary. The route then headed over the climb of the Category 2 Col de Portet d'Aspet at 1,069 m (3,507 ft) before a descent north-west to the outskirts of Sengouagnet. The route continued west through Juzet-d'Izaut and Cazaunous to the Category 3 Col des Ares at 815 m (2,674 ft) and descended south-west through Antichan-de-Frontignes and Fronsac, then heading west to Saléchan, Siradan and on to Mauléon-Barousse. From here, the route turned south-west to ascend the Hors catégorie Port de Balès at 1,755 m (5,758 ft). The race turned south-east at the top of the climb, for the final 21.5 km (13 mi) descent into Bagnères-de-Luchon.

Stage 16 result
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Australia.svg  Michael Rogers  (AUS) Tinkoff–Saxo 6h 07' 10"
2Flag of France.svg  Thomas Voeckler  (FRA) Team Europcar + 9"
3Flag of Belarus.svg  Vasil Kiryienka  (BLR) Team Sky + 9"
4Flag of Colombia.svg  José Serpa  (COL) Lampre–Merida + 9"
5Flag of France.svg  Cyril Gautier  (FRA) Team Europcar + 9"
6Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Greg Van Avermaet  (BEL) BMC Racing Team + 13"
7Flag of Poland.svg  Michał Kwiatkowski  (POL) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step + 36"
8Flag of Italy.svg  Matteo Montaguti  (ITA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 50"
9Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Tom-Jelte Slagter  (NED) Garmin–Sharp + 2' 11"
10Flag of France.svg  Tony Gallopin  (FRA) Lotto–Belisol + 2' 11"
General classification after stage 16
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana 73h 05' 19"
2Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 4' 37"
3Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) Jersey white.svg FDJ.fr + 5' 06"
4Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 6' 08"
5Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 6' 40"
6Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 9' 25"
7Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 9' 32"
8Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Laurens ten Dam  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 11' 12"
9Flag of Poland.svg  Michał Kwiatkowski  (POL) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step + 11' 28"
10Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 11' 33"

Stage 17

23 July 2014 Saint-Gaudens to Saint-Lary Pla d'Adet, 124.5 km (77 mi) [10]

This was a high mountain stage which travelled from the department of Haute-Garonne with a brief incursion into the Lleida province in Spain, back into Haute-Garonne and finished in the department of Hautes-Pyrénées. The stage departed south-west from Saint-Gaudens with racing officially starting just beyond the Valentine district of Saint-Gaudens, on the opposite side of the Garonne River.

The race passed through Martres-de-Rivière before turning south-east on the outskirts of Gourdan-Polignan. The route followed the Garonne River from Loures-Barousse, through Barbazan, with an intermediate sprint at Saint-Béat. From here, the race headed to Fos before turning south and crossing the border into Spain. The route travelled through Les and Bossòst, then turning west and ascending the Category 1 Col du Portillon at 1,292 m (4,239 ft), before re-entering France at the summit. The race then descended west into Bagnères-de-Luchon, before beginning the climb of the Category 1 Col de Peyresourde at 1,569 m (5,148 ft). This was followed by a 9 km (6 mi) descent continuing west into Loudenvielle and Génos. The race then travelled up the hairpin climb of the Category 1 Col de Val Louron-Azet at 1,580 m (5,184 ft) followed by a 10 km (6 mi) descent into Saint-Lary-Soulan. The final climb of the day was the Hors catégorie12 km (7 mi) ascent to the finish, at Pla d'Adet, at 1,654 m (5,427 ft).

Stage 17 result
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Poland.svg  Rafał Majka  (POL) Jersey polkadot.svg Tinkoff–Saxo 3h 35' 23"
2Flag of Italy.svg  Giovanni Visconti  (ITA) Movistar Team + 29"
3Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana + 46"
4Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 46"
5Flag of Italy.svg  Alessandro De Marchi  (ITA) Cannondale + 49"
6Flag of France.svg  Pierre Rolland  (FRA) Team Europcar + 52"
7Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Fränk Schleck  (LUX) Trek Factory Racing + 1' 12"
8Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 1' 12"
9Flag of Ireland.svg  Nicolas Roche  (IRL) Tinkoff–Saxo + 1' 25"
10Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 35"
General classification after stage 17
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana 76h 41' 28"
2Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 5' 26"
3Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) Jersey white.svg FDJ.fr + 6' 00"
4Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 6' 08"
5Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey red number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 7' 34"
6Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 10' 19"
7Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 11' 59"
8Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Laurens ten Dam  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 12' 16"
9Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 12' 40"
10Flag of France.svg  Pierre Rolland  (FRA) Team Europcar + 13' 15"

Stage 18

24 July 2014 Pau to Hautacam, 145.5 km (90 mi) [11]

This was a high mountain stage which travelled from the department of Pyrénées-Atlantiques into the department of Hautes-Pyrénées. The stage departed south from Pau with racing officially starting south of the Gelos district of Pau, on the opposite side of the Gave de Pau.

The route travelled south for a few kilometres, before turning east and heading to Pardies-Piétat and then south-east to Nay. The route travelled east through Bénéjacq and over the Category 3 Côte de Benejacq at 470 m (1,542 ft). The race continued east through Pontacq, to Ossun, and then around the southern side of the Tarbes–Lourdes–Pyrénées Airport. The route then continued south from Lanne, Bénac and Orincles. This was followed by the Category 3 Côte de Loucrup at 530 m (1,739 ft), and east to an intermediate sprint at Trébons, before heading south-east through Bagnères-de-Bigorre, Beaudéan and Campan. From Campan, the route headed south-east, south and then south-west, with a long 25.5 km (16 mi) climbing route to La Mongie, before heading west to the summit of the Hors catégorie Col du Tourmalet at 2,115 m (6,939 ft). The race descended west through Barèges, and turned north-west at Luz-Saint-Sauveur, before reaching the valley floor at Villelongue and north to Beaucens. The route then began to climb north into Ayros-Arbouix. From here, the race headed south-east into the final climb of the stage, which was the Hors catégorie14 km (9 mi) ascending route up to Hautacam, at 1,520 m (4,987 ft).

Stage 18 result
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana 4h 04' 17"
2Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) Jersey white.svg FDJ.fr + 1' 10"
3Flag of Poland.svg  Rafał Majka  (POL) Jersey polkadot.svg Tinkoff–Saxo + 1' 12"
4Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 1' 15"
5Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 1' 15"
6Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey red number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 1' 53"
7Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 1' 57"
8Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 1' 57"
9Flag of Spain.svg  Haimar Zubeldia  (ESP) Trek Factory Racing + 1' 59"
10Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 59"
General classification after stage 18
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana 80h 45' 45"
2Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) Jersey white.svg FDJ.fr + 7' 10"
3Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 7' 23"
4Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 7' 25"
5Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 9' 27"
6Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 11' 34"
7Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 13' 56"
8Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Laurens ten Dam  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 14' 15"
9Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 14' 37"
10Flag of Spain.svg  Haimar Zubeldia  (ESP) Trek Factory Racing + 16' 25"

Stage 19

25 July 2014 Maubourguet Pays du Val d'Adour to Bergerac, 208.5 km (130 mi) [12]

This was an undulating stage which travelled from the department of Hautes-Pyrénées, through Gers and Lot-et-Garonne, into the department of Dordogne. The stage departed north-east from Maubourguet with racing officially starting between Maubourguet and Marciac.

The race travelled north-east through Peyrusse-Grande and Vic-Fezensac, to Valence-sur-Baïse. The route then turned north to go through Condom, Nérac, Lavardac and Buzet-sur-Baïse, to an intermediate sprint at Tonneins. The route turned north-east, once again, to Tombebœuf, then north-west to Miramont-de-Guyenne and wound north to Eymet. The route continued north through Fonroque, to Mescoules, and on to Rouffignac-de-Sigoulès. From here, the route wound east to the Category 4 climb of the Côte de Monbazillac at 171 m (561 ft) and turned north to descend for about 10 km (6 mi). The race passed along the western side of the Bergerac Dordogne Périgord Airport, before the route finally turned east to cross the Dordogne River, into the finish in Bergerac.

Stage 19 result
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Lithuania.svg  Ramūnas Navardauskas  (LTU) Garmin–Sharp 4h 43' 41"
2Flag of Germany.svg  John Degenkolb  (GER) Giant–Shimano + 7"
3Flag of Norway.svg  Alexander Kristoff  (NOR) Team Katusha + 7"
4Flag of Australia.svg  Mark Renshaw  (AUS) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step + 7"
5Flag of Italy.svg  Daniele Bennati  (ITA) Tinkoff–Saxo + 7"
6Flag of Italy.svg  Alessandro Petacchi  (ITA) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step + 7"
7Flag of France.svg  Samuel Dumoulin  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 7"
8Flag of France.svg  Julien Simon  (FRA) Cofidis + 7"
9Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Sep Vanmarcke  (BEL) Belkin Pro Cycling + 7"
10Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Jürgen Roelandts  (BEL) Lotto–Belisol + 7"
General classification after stage 19
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana 85h 29' 33"
2Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) Jersey white.svg FDJ.fr + 7' 10"
3Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 7' 23"
4Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 7' 25"
5Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 9' 27"
6Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 11' 34"
7Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 13' 56"
8Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Laurens ten Dam  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 14' 15"
9Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 14' 37"
10Flag of Spain.svg  Haimar Zubeldia  (ESP) Trek Factory Racing + 16' 25"

Stage 20

26 July 2014 Bergerac to Périgueux, 54 km (34 mi) [13]

This short stage took place entirely in the department of Dordogne and was an individual time trial on an undulating road. The route headed north-west out of Bergerac, before turning north to the outskirts of Ginestet and Maurens, and on to the first time check at Beleymas. The road then bore north-east to Villamblard and north through Manzac-sur-Vern, before turning north-east again, heading to the second time check on the outskirts of Coursac. The route then zig-zagged north-east to the Côte de Coulounieix-Chamiers before crossing the River Isle and finishing in Périgueux.

Stage 20 result
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Germany.svg  Tony Martin  (GER) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step 1h 06' 21"
2Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Tom Dumoulin  (NED) Giant–Shimano + 1' 39"
3Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Jan Bárta  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 1' 47"
4Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana + 1' 58"
5Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 2' 02"
6Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 2' 08"
7Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 2' 27"
8Flag of France.svg  Sylvain Chavanel  (FRA) IAM Cycling + 2' 36"
9Flag of Spain.svg  Markel Irizar  (ESP) Trek Factory Racing + 2' 39"
10Flag of Italy.svg  Daniel Oss  (ITA) BMC Racing Team + 2' 58"
General classification after stage 20
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana 86h 37' 52"
2Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 7' 52"
3Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) Jersey white.svg FDJ.fr + 8' 24"
4Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 9' 55"
5Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 11' 44"
6Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 11' 46"
7Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 14' 41"
8Flag of Spain.svg  Haimar Zubeldia  (ESP) Trek Factory Racing + 18' 12"
9Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Laurens ten Dam  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 18' 20"
10Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 21' 24"

Stage 21

27 July 2014 Évry to Paris Champs-Élysées, 137.5 km (85 mi) [14]

This was an undulating stage which travelled from the department of Essonne, through Hauts-de-Seine into Paris. The stage departed from Évry, with racing officially starting at Bondoufle.

The riders travelled south and west around the Brétigny-sur-Orge Air Base to Arpajon. The route continued west to the Category 4 climb of Côte de Briis-sous-Forges at 172 m (564 ft) and headed north through Orsay and Vauhallan. The race then headed east through Massy, north to Châtenay-Malabry, and on through Clamart and Meudon to Issy-les-Moulineaux, before crossing the River Seine and the Île Saint-Germain. The race turned north-east and travelled along the Right Bank of the Seine to Pont Alexandre III, where the riders crossed the Seine, again, and turned left, passing Les Invalides. The race followed the river along to the Pont du Carrousel and crossed the river for a final time. The riders then turned left to travel along the Rue de Rivoli, through the Place de la Concorde and onto the Champs-Élysées. The race then began ten circuits around central Paris, heading up the Champs-Élysées and around the Arc de Triomphe on the Place de l'Étoile. The riders returned, back down the opposite side of the Champs-Élysées, and around the Jardin des Tuileries. Finally, back along the Rue de Rivoli, and through the Place de la Concorde, to the finish line on the Champs-Élysées.

The La Course by Le Tour de France rode 13 laps of the traditional course on the Champs-Élysées a few hours before the men arrived. [15]

Stage 21 result
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Germany.svg  Marcel Kittel  (GER) Giant–Shimano 3h 20' 50"
2Flag of Norway.svg  Alexander Kristoff  (NOR) Team Katusha + 0"
3Flag of Lithuania.svg  Ramūnas Navardauskas  (LTU) Garmin–Sharp + 0"
4Flag of Germany.svg  André Greipel  (GER) Lotto–Belisol + 0"
5Flag of Australia.svg  Mark Renshaw  (AUS) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step + 0"
6Flag of Austria.svg  Bernhard Eisel  (AUT) Team Sky + 0"
7Flag of France.svg  Bryan Coquard  (FRA) Team Europcar + 0"
8Flag of Italy.svg  Alessandro Petacchi  (ITA) Omega Pharma–Quick-Step + 0"
9Flag of Slovakia.svg  Peter Sagan  (SVK) Jersey green.svg Cannondale + 0"
10Flag of France.svg  Romain Feillu  (FRA) Bretagne–Séché Environnement + 0"
Final general classification
Rank Rider Team Time
1Flag of Italy.svg  Vincenzo Nibali  (ITA) Jersey yellow.svg Astana 89h 59' 06"
2Flag of France.svg  Jean-Christophe Péraud  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 7' 37"
3Flag of France.svg  Thibaut Pinot  (FRA) Jersey white.svg FDJ.fr + 8' 15"
4Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Movistar Team + 9' 40"
5Flag of the United States.svg  Tejay van Garderen  (USA) BMC Racing Team + 11' 24"
6Flag of France.svg  Romain Bardet  (FRA) Jersey yellow number.svg Ag2r–La Mondiale + 11' 26"
7Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Leopold König  (CZE) NetApp–Endura + 14' 32"
8Flag of Spain.svg  Haimar Zubeldia  (ESP) Trek Factory Racing + 17' 57"
9Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Laurens ten Dam  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 18' 11"
10Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Bauke Mollema  (NED) Belkin Pro Cycling + 21' 15"

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