2014 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships

Last updated
2014 IIHF World U20 Championship
2014 WJHC logo.png
Tournament details
Host countryFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
DatesDecember 26, 2013 – January 5, 2014
Teams10
Venue(s) Malmö Arena and Malmö Isstadion  (in 1 host city)
Final positions
Champions  Gold medal blank.svg Flag of Finland.svg  Finland (3rd title)
Runner-up  Silver medal blank.svg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Third place  Bronze medal blank.svg Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
Fourth placeFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Tournament statistics
Matches played31
Goals scored202 (6.52 per match)
Attendance144,268 (4,654 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Flag of Finland.svg Teuvo Teräväinen (15 points)
MVP Flag of Sweden.svg Filip Forsberg
Website 2014 World Juniors
2013
2015

The 2014 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships (formerly called the IIHF U20 World Championship) [1] was the 38th edition of the Ice Hockey World Junior Championship (WJHC), hosted in Malmö, Sweden. The 13,700-seat Malmö Arena was the main venue, with the smaller Malmö Isstadion the secondary venue. It began on December 26, 2013, and ended with the gold medal game on January 5, 2014. [2]

Contents

Finland defeated host team Sweden in the final 3–2 in overtime and won their first gold medal since 1998, as well as their third gold medal in total. It was also their first medal in the tournament since 2006. Sweden earned their second consecutive silver medal, their ninth silver medal in total, as well as their third consecutive medal in the tournament.

For the first time since 197981, Canada failed to capture a medal for the second consecutive year by losing the bronze medal game 1–2 to Russia, who captured the team's fourth consecutive medal at the tournament. The 2014 tournament marked the first time since 1998 that all three medalists were European teams.

A total of 144,268 spectators attended the 31 games, setting a new attendance record for IIHF World Junior Championship tournaments hosted in Europe. 12,023 spectators attended the gold medal game, setting a new record for a single IIHF World Junior Championship game in Europe. [3]

The playoff round was expanded to eight teams (again), with group leaders no longer getting a bye into the semifinals. The first time since the 2002 tournament.

Venues

Malmö Malmö
Malmö Arena
Capacity: 12,500
Malmö Isstadion
Capacity: 5,800
Malmo Arena 2008.jpg Malmo isstadion 2.jpg

Officials

The IIHF selected 12 referees and 10 linesmen to work the 2014 IIHF Ice Hockey U20 World Championship
They were the following: [4]

Format

A change in format was implemented for the Top Division. The four best ranked teams from each group of the preliminary round advanced to the quarterfinals, while the last placed teams from each group played a relegation round in a best of three format to determine the relegated team. [5] This format was last used in 2002, except the current tournament will not incorporate playoff games to determine places five through eight.

Player eligibility

A player is eligible to play in the 2014 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships if: [6]

If a player who has never played in IIHF-organized competition wishes to switch national eligibility, he must have played in competitions for two consecutive years in the new country without playing in another country, as well as show his move to the new country's national association with an international transfer card. In case the player has previously played in IIHF-organized competition but wishes to switch national eligibility, he must have played in competitions for four consecutive years in the new country without playing in another country, he must show his move to the new country's national association with an international transfer card, as well as be a citizen of the new country. A player may only switch national eligibility once. [7]

Top Division

Rosters

Preliminary round

All times are local (UTC+1).

Team qualified to Quarterfinals
Team will play in Relegation round

Group A

TeamGP
W
OTW
OTL
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 430101912+710
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 43001217+149
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 4110291345
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 41003161603
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 41003724173
26 December 2013
13:30
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg2–7
(2–4, 0–2, 0–1)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 1,861
26 December 2013
17:30
Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg1–5
(0–2, 0–2, 1–1)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 1,321
27 December 2013
15:00
Slovakia  Flag of Slovakia.svg9–2
(3–0, 3–1, 3–1)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 533
28 December 2013
13:30
United States  Flag of the United States.svg6–3
(2–0, 1–2, 3–1)
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 1,658
28 December 2013
17:30
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg4–5 GWS
(1–1, 0–1, 3–2)
(OT: 0–0)
(SO: 1–2)
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 3,011
29 December 2013
15:00
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg0–8
(0–2, 0–4, 0–2)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 651
30 December 2013
13:30
Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg0–3
(0–1, 0–2, 0-0)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 1,062
30 December 2013
17:30
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg5–3
(1–1, 1–2, 3–0)
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 2,558
31 December 2013
13:30
Slovakia  Flag of Slovakia.svg1–4
(0–2, 1–2, 0–0)
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 1,259
31 December 2013
17:30
United States  Flag of the United States.svg2–3
(0–0, 1–1, 1–2)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 3,882

Group B

TeamGP
W
OTW
OTL
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 44000227+1512
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 420111410+47
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 42002218+136
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 41102111765
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 40004329260
26 December 2013
15:00
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg0–11
(0–5, 0–5, 0–1)
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Malmö Arena
Attendance: 4,260
26 December 2013
19:00
Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg3–5
(2–3, 0–0, 1–2)
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Malmö Arena
Attendance: 11,109
27 December 2013
17:30
Finland  Flag of Finland.svg5–1
(1–0, 3–0, 1–1)
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Malmö Arena
Attendance: 734
28 December 2013
15:00
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg4–2
(1–1, 2–0, 1–1)
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Malmö Arena
Attendance: 11,604
28 December 2013
19:00
Russia  Flag of Russia.svg7–1
(2–1, 3–0, 2–0)
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Malmö Arena
Attendance: 7,543
29 December 2013
17:30
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg0–10
(0–3, 0–3, 0–4)
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Malmö Arena
Attendance: 11,296
30 December 2013
15:00
Russia  Flag of Russia.svg1–4
(1–0, 0–3, 0–1)
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Malmö Arena
Attendance: 945
30 December 2013
19:00
Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg3–2
(0–1, 1–0, 2–1)
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Malmö Arena
Attendance: 418
31 December 2013
14:00
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg3–2
(2–0, 0–1, 1–1)
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Malmö Arena
Attendance: 11,528
31 December 2013
18:00
Finland  Flag of Finland.svg3–4 GWS
(1–1, 1–2, 1–0)
(OT: 0–0)
(SO: 0–1)
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Malmö Arena
Attendance: 718

Relegation round

The relegation round was a best-of-three series. Norway lost two games and was relegated to Division I for 2015.

January 2, 2014
11:00
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg0–3
(0–0, 0–3, 0–0)
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Malmö Arena
Attendance: 294
January 3, 2014
16:00
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg3–4
(1–2, 2–0, 0–2)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 463
January 5, 2014
12:00
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg3–1
(1–0, 1–0, 1–1)
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 157

Playoff round

 QuarterfinalsSemifinals
              
 1AFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 4 
4BFlag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1 
 1AFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1 
 2BFlag of Finland.svg  Finland 5 
2BFlag of Finland.svg  Finland 5Final
 3AFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 3 
  2BFlag of Finland.svg  Finland 3
 1BFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2
 1BFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 6 
4AFlag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 0 
 1BFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2Bronze medal game
 3BFlag of Russia.svg  Russia 1 
2AFlag of the United States.svg  United States 31AFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1
 3BFlag of Russia.svg  Russia 5 3BFlag of Russia.svg  Russia 2

Quarterfinals

2 January 2014
12:00
United States  Flag of the United States.svg3–5
(3–2, 0–2, 0–1)
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 1,876
2 January 2014
14:30
Finland  Flag of Finland.svg5–3
(1–1, 1–2, 3–0)
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Malmö Arena
Attendance: 4,085
2 January 2014
17:00
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg4–1
(1–0, 1–1, 2–0)
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Malmö Isstadion
Attendance: 2,580
2 January 2014
19:30
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg6–0
(2–0, 2–0, 2–0)
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia Malmö Arena
Attendance: 10,857

Semifinals

4 January 2014
15:00
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg2–1
(1–0, 0–0, 1–1)
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Malmö Arena
Attendance: 11,725
4 January 2014
19:00
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg1–5
(0–0, 1–3, 0–2)
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Malmö Arena
Attendance: 11,544

Bronze medal game

5 January 2014
15:00
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg1–2
(0–2, 0–0, 1–0)
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Malmö Arena
Attendance: 10,713

Final

5 January 2014
19:00
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg2–3 OT
(0–1, 1–1, 1–0)
(OT: 0–1)
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Malmö Arena
Attendance: 12,023

Statistics

Scoring leaders

PosPlayerCountryGPGAPts+/−PIM
1 Teuvo Teräväinen Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 721315+112
2 Filip Forsberg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 74812+32
3 Saku Mäenalanen Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 77411+90
4 Anthony Mantha Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 75611+60
5 Martin Réway Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 5461004
6 Dávid Gríger Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 53710+10
7 Jonathan Drouin Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 7369+524
8 Elias Lindholm Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 6279−16
9 Mikhail Grigorenko Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 7538+60
10 Milan Kolena Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 5448−16

GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; +/− = Plus-minus; PIM = Penalties In Minutes
Source: IIHF.com

Goaltending leaders

(minimum 40% team's total ice time)

PosPlayerCountryTOIGAGAASv%SO
1 Juuse Saros Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 344:5391.5794.300
2 Andrei Vasilevski Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 327:50101.8393.330
3 Oscar Dansk Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 369:42111.7992.861
4 Joachim Svendsen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 318:01163.0291.531
5 Marek Langhamer Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 243:47122.9590.620

TOI = Time On Ice (minutes:seconds); GA = Goals Against; GAA = Goals Against Average; Sv% = Save Percentage; SO = Shutouts
Source: IIHF.com

Tournament awards

 2014 IIHF World Junior Championship Winners 
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
3rd title

Reference:

Most Valuable Player
All-star team
IIHF best player awards

Final standings

Team
Gold medal icon.svgFlag of Finland.svg  Finland
Silver medal icon.svgFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Bronze medal icon.svgFlag of Russia.svg  Russia
4thFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
5thFlag of the United States.svg  United States
6thFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic
7thFlag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
8thFlag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia
9thFlag of Germany.svg  Germany
10thFlag of Norway.svg  Norway

Note that due to the lack of playoff games for determining the spots 5–8, these spots were determined by the regulation round records for each team.

Medalists

Gold:Silver:Bronze:
Flag of Finland.svg Finland
#1 – Janne Juvonen
#4 – Mikko Lehtonen
#5 – Rasmus Ristolainen
#7 – Esa Lindell
#8 – Saku Mäenalanen
#9 – Julius Honka
#10 – Juuso Ikonen
#11 – Joni Nikko
#12 – Ville Pokka
#13 – Ville-Valtteri Leskinen
#14 – Topi Nättinen
#15 – Juuso Vainio
#18 – Saku Kinnunen
#19 – Mikko Vainonen
#20 – Teuvo Teräväinen
#21 – Aleksi Mustonen
#22 – Henri Ikonen
#25 – Henrik Haapala
#26 – Rasmus Kulmala
#28 – Artturi Lehkonen
#29 – Otto Rauhala
#30 – Ville Husso
#31 – Juuse Saros
Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden
#1 – Marcus Högberg
#3 – Robin Norell
#4 – Christian Djoos
#5 – Andreas Johnson
#6 – Jesper Pettersson
#8 – Linus Arnesson
#9 – Jacob de la Rose
#10 – Alexander Wennberg
#13 – Gustav Olofsson
#14 – Robert Hägg
#15 – Sebastian Collberg
#16 – Filip Forsberg
#18 – André Burakovsky
#19 – Elias Lindholm
#20 – Lukas Bengtsson
#21 – Filip Sandberg
#23 – Nick Sörensen
#26 – Erik Karlsson
#27 – Anton Karlsson
#28 – Lucas Wallmark
#29 – Oskar Sundqvist
#30 – Jonas Johansson
#35 – Oscar Dansk
Flag of Russia.svg Russia
#1 – Igor Ustinski
#4 – Ilya Lyubushkin
#5 – Alexei Bereglazov
#6 – Valeri Vasilyev
#7 – Kirill Maslov
#8 – Nikita Tryamkin
#9 – Anton Slepyshev
#10 – Bogdan Yakimov
#11 – Damir Zhafyarov
#12 – Ivan Barbashev
#14 – Nikolai Skladnichenko
#15 – Georgi Busarov
#16 – Nikita Zadorov
#17 – Eduard Gimatov
#18 – Vyacheslav Osnovin
#19 – Pavel Buchnevich
#20 – Ivan Nalimov
#21 – Alexander Barabanov
#22 – Andrei Mironov
#23 – Valentin Zykov
#25 – Mikhail Grigorenko
#27 – Vadim Khlopotov
#30 – Andrei Vasilevski

Source: 1 2 3

Division I

Division I A

The Division I A tournament was played in Sanok, Poland, from 15 to 21 December 2013. [8]

TeamGP
W
OTW
OTL
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 550002010+1015
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 54001237+1612
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 530022314+99
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 52003101446
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 501041128172
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 50014620141
Promoted to the 2015 Top DivisionRelegated to the 2015 Division I B

Division I B

The Division I B tournament was played in Dumfries, Great Britain, from 9 to 15 December 2013. [9]

TeamGP
W
OTW
OTL
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 532002014+613
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 540012816+1212
Flag of France.svg  France 52021151618
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 52003111546
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 50005172360
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (DQ)51112132076
Promoted to the 2015 Division I ARelegated to the 2015 Division II A

Team Great Britain was disqualified due to use of an ineligible player and was relegated to the 2015 Division II A. [10]

Division II

Division II A

The Division II A tournament was played in Miskolc, Hungary, from 15 to 21 December 2013. [11]

TeamGP
W
OTW
OTL
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 55000347+2715
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 531012114+711
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 530112218+410
Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 52003111986
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 51004820123
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 50005826180
Promoted to the 2015 Division I B Relegated to the 2015 Division II B

Division II B

The Division II B tournament was played in Jaca, Spain, from 11 to 17 January 2014. [12]

TeamGP
W
OTW
OTL
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 550004112+2915
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 540011911+812
Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 53002151509
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 51103121975
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 510132017+34
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 50005940310
Promoted to the 2015 Division II A Relegated to the 2015 Division III

Division III

The Division III tournament was played in İzmir, Turkey, from 12 to 18 January 2014. [13]

TeamGP
W
OTW
OTL
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 55000373+3415
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 54001296+2312
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 521021611+58
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 520121024147
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 50104726192
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 50014433291
Promoted to the 2015 Division II B

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2018 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships 2018 edition of the World Junior Ice Hockey Championships

The 2018 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships was the 42nd edition of the Ice Hockey World Junior Championship, and was hosted by the city of Buffalo, New York at the KeyBank Center and HarborCenter. It opened on December 26, 2017 and closed with the gold medal game on January 5, 2018. It was the sixth time that the United States has hosted the IHWJC, and the second time that Buffalo has done so, previously hosting in 2011.

The 2009 IIHF Inline Hockey World Championship Division I was an international inline hockey tournament run by the International Ice Hockey Federation. The Division I tournament ran alongside the 2009 IIHF Inline Hockey World Championship and took place between 7 and 13 June 2009 in Ingolstadt, Germany at the Saturn Arena and Saturn Rink 2. The tournament was won by Austria who upon winning gained promotion to the 2010 IIHF Inline Hockey World Championship. While South Africa and Chinese Taipei were relegated to the continental qualifications after losing their relegation round games.

References

  1. http://www.worldjunior2013.com/en/channels/2013/wm20/top/news/welcome-to-malmoe/
  2. Pålsson, Fredrik. "World Juniors 2014 to Malmö". EuroHockey.com. Retrieved 2 February 2012.
  3. Merk, Martin (2014-01-05). "Malmö sets European records". IIHF . Retrieved 2014-01-05.
  4. "Referee Assignments" (PDF). IIHF.com. Retrieved 25 December 2013.
  5. "New format for U18, U20 Worlds". IIHF.com. 2012-05-29. Retrieved 2011-05-29.
  6. "IIHF statutes and bylaws" (PDF). IIHF . Retrieved 2014-01-01.
  7. "IIHF Eligibility". IIHF . Retrieved 2014-01-01.
  8. Division I A Statistics
  9. Division I B Statistics
  10. GB U20s relegated from division 1B Archived 2014-04-30 at the Wayback Machine
  11. Division II A Statistics
  12. Division II B Statistics
  13. Division III Statistics