2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Final

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2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Final
Off to a good start (19781364556) (2).jpg
United States players celebrate after captain Carli Lloyd's 2nd-minute goal
Event 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup
Date5 July 2015
Venue BC Place, Vancouver
Player of the Match Carli Lloyd (United States)
Referee Kateryna Monzul (Ukraine)
Attendance53,341
WeatherSunny
25 °C (77 °F) [1]
2011
2019

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Final was a women's association football match that took place on 5 July 2015 at BC Place, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, to determine the winner of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. It was played between Japan and the United States, in a rematch of the 2011 final. The stakes were high for both sides: if the United States won the match, it would be the only country to have won in three Women's World Cup finals; if Japan had won instead, then it would be the first football team, men's or women's, to win twice under the same coach (Norio Sasaki for Japan) since Vittorio Pozzo led Italy to victory in the 1934 World Cup and the 1938 World Cup. Ultimately, the United States won 5–2, winning its first title in 16 years and becoming the first team to win three Women's World Cup finals.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, usually known as women's football or women's soccer, is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

BC Place stadium at Vancouver, Canada

BC Place is a multi-purpose stadium located at the north side of False Creek, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It is owned and operated by the BC Pavilion Corporation (PavCo), a crown corporation of the province. It is currently the home of the BC Lions of the Canadian Football League (CFL), Vancouver Whitecaps FC of Major League Soccer (MLS) and the annual Canada Sevens as well as the BC Sports Hall of Fame. The stadium also served as the main stadium for the 2010 Winter Olympics and 2010 Paralympics which Vancouver hosted, as well as a venue for multiple matches including the championship match for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Vancouver City in British Columbia, Canada

Vancouver is a coastal seaport city in western Canada, located in the Lower Mainland region of British Columbia. As the most populous city in the province, the 2016 census recorded 631,486 people in the city, up from 603,502 in 2011. The Greater Vancouver area had a population of 2,463,431 in 2016, making it the third-largest metropolitan area in Canada. Vancouver has the highest population density in Canada, with over 5,400 people per square kilometre, which makes it the fifth-most densely populated city with over 250,000 residents in North America, behind New York City, Guadalajara, San Francisco, and Mexico City according to the 2011 census. Vancouver is one of the most ethnically and linguistically diverse cities in Canada according to that census; 52% of its residents have a first language other than English. 48.9% have neither English nor French as their first language. Roughly 30% of the city's inhabitants are of Chinese heritage.

Contents

Because of the expanded competition format, it was the first time the finalists had played a seventh game in the tournament. The United States had previously reached the final game three times, winning twice (in 1991 and 1999) and placing as runners up in 2011. This was Japan's second successive final appearance and was their attempt to be the first country to successfully defend a title since Germany in the 2007 World Cup. Both teams were undefeated throughout the tournament, with the United States only conceding one goal in the six matches leading up to the final and Japan winning all of their matches in regular time.

1991 FIFA Womens World Cup 1991 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football's international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. The competition was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated, maker of M&M's candy. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup.

1999 FIFA Womens World Cup 1999 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup was the third edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It was hosted as well as won by the United States and took place from 19 June to 10 July 1999 at eight venues across the country. The tournament was the most successful FIFA Women's World Cup in terms of attendance, television ratings, and public interest.

2011 FIFA Womens World Cup 2011 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup was the sixth FIFA Women's World Cup competition, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It was held from 26 June to 17 July 2011 in Germany, which won the right to host the event in October 2007. Japan won the final against the United States on a penalty shoot-out following a 2–2 draw after extra time and became the first Asian team to win a senior FIFA World Cup.

Background

Before this tournament, the two finalists had met each other three times in World Cup play. The United States beat Japan 3–0 in the group stage in 1991 and won 4–0 in a 1995 quarter-final match, while Japan bettered the United States 3–1 in a penalty shoot-out in the 2011 World Cup final after the match was tied 2–2 after extra time. The United States won the final 2–1 in the gold medal match at the 2012 Summer Olympics. The last meeting between the two teams was at the 2014 Algarve Cup, which ended in 0–0 draw, after the previous Algarve Cup between the two teams was won by Japan 1–0. [2] Both the United States and Japan began the 2015 Women's World Cup as favorites to win the tournament. [3] The United States was ranked second in the FIFA Women's World Rankings, while Japan was ranked fourth. [4]

1995 FIFA Womens World Cup 1995 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, the second edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in Sweden and won by Norway. The tournament featured 12 women's national teams from six continental confederations. The 12 teams were drawn into three groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams and two best third-ranked teams advanced to the knockout stage, beginning with the quarter-finals and culminating with the final at Råsunda Stadium on 18 June 1995.

A penalty shoot-out is a method of determining which team is awarded victory in an association football match that cannot end in a draw, when the score is tied after the regulation playing time as well as extra time have expired. In a penalty shoot-out, each team takes turns shooting at goal from the penalty mark, with the goal only defended by the opposing team's goalkeeper. Each team has five shots which must be taken by different kickers; the team that makes more successful kicks is declared the victor. Shoot-outs finish as soon as one team has an insurmountable lead. If scores are level after five pairs of shots, the shootout progresses into additional "sudden-death" rounds. Balls successfully kicked into the goal during a shoot-out do not count as goals for the individual kickers or the team, and are tallied separately from the goals scored during normal play. Although the procedure for each individual kick in the shoot-out resembles that of a penalty kick, there are some differences. Most notably, neither the kicker nor any player other than the goalkeeper may play the ball again once it has been kicked.

2011 FIFA Womens World Cup Final association football match

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Final was a football match that took place on 17 July 2011 at Commerzbank-Arena, in Frankfurt, Germany, to determine the winner of 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. It was played between Japan and the United States. Japan won 3-1 on a penalty shoot-out following a 2–2 draw after extended time, becoming the first Asian team to win a FIFA World Cup final.

The United States entered the 2015 final as two-time World champions, having won the first and third installments of the Women's World Cup. The United States were the first crowned champions at the inaugural 1991 edition of the Women's World Cup, held in China. They beat Norway 2–1 in the final, with two goals from Michelle Akers. In the 1999 final, host nation United States and China played to a scoreless draw. After extra time, the United States won the match with a 5–4 penalties victory. [5]

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup Final was a football match that took place on 30 November 1991 at Tianhe Stadium in Guangzhou, China. It was played between Norway and the United States to determine the winner of the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup. The United States beat Norway 2–1, with two goals from Michelle Akers-Stahl, to become winners of the first ever FIFA Women's World Cup.

Michelle Anne Akers is an American former soccer player who starred in the 1991 and 1999 Women's World Cup and 1996 Olympics victories by the United States. At the 1991 World Cup, she won the Golden Shoe as the top scorer, with 10 goals.

The 2015 final was Japan's second consecutive time contesting a World Cup final. Their first and only win was at the expense of the United States in the 2011 Women's World Cup, held in Germany. [6] It was also the third consecutive time that a major women's football tournament final featured Japan and the United States, after the 2011 World Cup and 2012 Olympics.

On 30 June 2015, FIFA President Sepp Blatter announced that he would not travel to Vancouver to attend the final, leaving FIFA vice-president Issa Hayatou to present the trophy at the final to the champion. [7]

Sepp Blatter 8th President of the International Federation of Association Football

Joseph "Sepp" Blatter is a Swiss football administrator who was the eighth President of the FIFA from 1998 to 2015. He is currently serving a six-year ban from participating in FIFA activities.

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is a non-profit organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and efootball. It is the highest governing body of football.

Issa Hayatou Cameroonian basketball player and football executive

Issa Hayatou is a Cameroonian former athlete and sports executive. He served as the acting FIFA president until 26 February 2016 as the previous president, Sepp Blatter, was banned from all football-related activities in 2015 as a part of the FIFA corruption investigation of 2015. He was the president of the Confederation of African Football (CAF) between 1988 and 2017. In 2002, he ran for president of FIFA but was defeated by Blatter. He is also a member of the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

Route to the final

Japan's quarter-final match against Australia at Commonwealth Stadium FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 - Edmonton (19224574865).jpg
Japan's quarter-final match against Australia at Commonwealth Stadium

The United States reached the final undefeated and only conceded one goal in the six matches leading up to the final. The squad was drawn into Group D of the Women's World Cup, along with Australia, Sweden and Nigeria. The United States' first match against Australia was played at Winnipeg Stadium. After Megan Rapinoe scored an early goal, Australia managed to equalize. Two goals in the second half saw the United States take all three points in their first match. [8] The United States played their second match against Sweden in Winnipeg. After a goalless 90 minutes, both teams walked away with a point apiece. [9] In their final group match, the United States played Nigeria at a sold out BC Place. A single goal from captain Abby Wambach in the 45th minute was enough for the United States to progress to the round of 16 stage as group winners to face Group F third-placed team Colombia. [10] A 53rd-minute goal by Alex Morgan and penalty converted by Carli Lloyd in the 66th minute saw the end the game 2–0. [11] In the quarter-final, the United States took on China in Lansdowne Stadium. A goal by Carli Lloyd saw the game end 1–0. [12] The United States were matched up against number one ranked Germany in the semi-finals. Goals by Carli Lloyd and Kelley O'Hara in the Olympic Stadium ended the match 2–0, with the United States progressing to the 2015 final. [13]

Japan reached the final undefeated and conceded only three goals. They were drawn into Group C along with Switzerland, Cameroon and Ecuador. Japan's World Cup run started in the opening match of the tournament against Switzerland in Vancouver. A 29th-minute penalty from captain Aya Miyama secured all three points for Japan. [14] In their second match, Japan played Cameroon. Goals from Aya Sameshima and Yuika Sugasawa gave Japan a 2–1 win. [15] Japan's final group stage match was against Ecuador in Winnipeg ended in 1–0, thanks to a fifth-minute goal by Yūki Ōgimi. [16] After winning their group, Japan next faced Group A third-placed team Netherlands in the round of 16. Goals at either side of the break, by Saori Ariyoshi and Mizuho Sakaguchi, saw the match end 2–1. [17] In the quarter-finals, Japan faced 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup Final opponents Australia in Commonwealth Stadium. [18] An 87th-minute goal by Mana Iwabuchi was enough to ensure Japan reached the next round. In the semi-finals, Japan faced England in Edmonton. Two penalties in the first half and an own goal by Laura Bassett in the 92nd minute ended the match at 2–1 to send Japan into their second consecutive World Cup final. [19]

United StatesRoundJapan
OpponentResult Group stage OpponentResult
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 3–1 Match 1Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1–0
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 0–0 Match 2Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 2–1
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 1–0 Match 3Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 1–0
Group D
PosTeamPldPts
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States 37
2Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 34
3Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 33
4Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 31
Source: FIFA
Final standing
Group C
PosTeamPldPts
1Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 39
2Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 36
3Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 33
4Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 30
Source: FIFA
OpponentResult Knockout stage OpponentResult
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 2–0 Round of 16 Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 2–1
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 1–0 Quarter-finals Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 1–0
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 2–0 Semi-finals Flag of England.svg  England 2–1

Match

Summary

Carli Lloyd during the final Carli Lloyd USA vs Japan 2015 WWC Final 2015-07-05 (19325379710) (2).jpg
Carli Lloyd during the final

The match was played under hazy conditions due to nearby wildfires and winds that carried the smoke towards the Lower Mainland region. [20] The United States struck early, scoring four goals in the first 16 minutes. Three of those goals were scored by midfielder Carli Lloyd, giving her the fastest hat-trick in World Cup history. [21] Lloyd's first goal at the 3rd minute was the fastest in a Women's World Cup final, [22] as she drove in a corner kick from Megan Rapinoe. Her goal also marked the first time Japan had trailed throughout the tournament. Lloyd again scored in the 5th minute off of a free kick from Lauren Holiday. Holiday scored in the 14th minute after Japan defender Azusa Iwashimizu failed to clear the ball on a header and turned over possession. Lloyd's goal in the 16th minute, which Reuters called "one of the most remarkable goals ever witnessed in a Women's World Cup", [23] was struck from the halfway line, catching Japan goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori out of position. [24] The stunning goal meant Lloyd became the first woman to score a hat trick in a World Cup final and the first player, male or female, to do so since Geoff Hurst did so for England against West Germany in the 1966 final at Wembley.

Striker Yūki Ōgimi scored with a left-footed shot to give Japan's first goal in the 27th minute, [25] outmaneuvering United States defender Julie Johnston. [26] Japan coach Norio Sasaki then responded tactically by introducing two first half substitutes, introducing midfielder Homare Sawa on for Iwashimizu and replacing winger Nahomi Kawasumi for striker Yuika Sugasawa. [27] An own goal off the head of Johnston from an Aya Miyama free kick added to Japan's scoreline in the second half, at the 52nd minute. Midfielder Tobin Heath scored the final goal of the game off of a pass from Morgan Brian for the United States two minutes later. The combined seven goals were the most in Women's World Cup final history, and ties the record for most goals in any men's or women's World Cup final with the men's 1958 FIFA World Cup Final, in which Brazil defeated Sweden 5–2. [28]

Details

United States  Flag of the United States (Pantone).svg5–2Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Lloyd Soccerball shade.svg 3', 5', 16'
Holiday Soccerball shade.svg 14'
Heath Soccerball shade.svg 54'
Report Ōgimi Soccerball shade.svg 27'
Johnston Soccerball shade.svg 52' (o.g.)
BC Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 53,341
Referee: Kateryna Monzul (Ukraine)
Kit left arm usa1415h.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body usa1516h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts blackstripes.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks usa1516h.png
Kit socks long.svg
United States [29]
Kit left arm JFA 14hW.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body JFA 14h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm JFA 15h womens.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts JFA 15h womens.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks JFA 15h womens.png
Kit socks long.svg
Japan [29]
GK1 Hope Solo
RB11 Ali Krieger
CB19 Julie Johnston
CB4 Becky Sauerbrunn
LB22 Meghan Klingenberg
RM17 Tobin Heath Sub off.svg 79'
CM12 Lauren Holiday
CM14 Morgan Brian
LM15 Megan Rapinoe Sub off.svg 61'
CF13 Alex Morgan Sub off.svg 86'
CF10 Carli Lloyd (c)
Substitutions:
DF5 Kelley O'Hara Sub on.svg 61'
FW20 Abby Wambach Sub on.svg 79'
DF3 Christie Rampone Sub on.svg 86'
Manager:
Jill Ellis
USA-JPN (women) 2015-07-05.svg
GK18 Ayumi Kaihori
RB19 Saori Ariyoshi
CB3 Azusa Iwashimizu Sub off.svg 33'
CB4 Saki Kumagai
LB5 Aya Sameshima
RM9 Nahomi Kawasumi Sub off.svg 39'
CM6 Mizuho Sakaguchi
CM13 Rumi Utsugi
LM8 Aya Miyama (c)
CF11 Shinobu Ohno Sub off.svg 60'
CF17 Yūki Ōgimi
Substitutions:
MF10 Homare Sawa Yellow card.svg 82'Sub on.svg 33'
FW15 Yuika Sugasawa Sub on.svg 39'
FW16 Mana Iwabuchi Yellow card.svg 85'Sub on.svg 60'
Manager:
Norio Sasaki

Player of the Match:
Carli Lloyd (United States)

Assistant referees:
Nataliya Rachynska (Ukraine)
Yolanda Parga (Spain)
Fourth official:
Claudia Umpierrez (Uruguay)
Fifth official:
Loreto Toloza (Chile)

Match rules:

  • 90 minutes.
  • 30 minutes of extra time if necessary.
  • Penalty shoot-out if scores still tied.
  • Twelve named eligible substitutes.
  • Maximum of three substitutions.

Statistics

Outcome

Carli Lloyd broke multiple goal scoring records in the final Carli Lloyd pointing.jpg
Carli Lloyd broke multiple goal scoring records in the final
United States ticker-tape parade in New York City The United States Women's Soccer Team Ticker-Tape Parade New York City (19585111425).jpg
United States ticker-tape parade in New York City

The final broke multiple records. The goals by Carli Lloyd in the 3rd, 5th and 16th minutes made her the first player to score a hat trick in a Women's World Cup's Final, second in either men's or women's final and the fastest from kickoff in either men's or women's World Cup tournament. Yūki Ōgimi's goal in the twenty-seventh minute ended a United States streak at 540 minutes of not conceding a goal, tying a World Cup record of Germany in 2007. [32] Homare Sawa, a member of the Japanese 2011 winning team, was introduced in the first half of the game. Christie Rampone, the only player remaining from the United States 1999 winning team, and Abby Wambach came on as subs late in the game. This is expected to have been the final World Cup appearance for all three. [33] Rampone also became the oldest player to ever play in a Women's World Cup match, at the age of 40 years. [34]

It also marked the first time since 1999 the United States held two major trophies in women's football (the Olympics medal and the World Cup). The United States also overtook Germany as the highest-scoring team in women's World Cup history. [35]

The 5–2 scoreline set a record for the highest number of goals scored in a Women's World Cup final, and equaled the score of a match played between the United States and Japan at the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. [36]

On U.S. television, the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup shattered viewing records for soccer – played by men or women. With the Fox Network reporting 25.4 million viewers and Spanish-language Telemundo reporting 1.3 million viewers, the combined 26.7 million viewers made the final the most-watched soccer game in American history. [37]

As prize money for their victory, the US team was awarded $2 million. This paled in comparison to the 2014 men's champion, Germany, who received $35 million. [38]

On 11 July, the World Cup win was celebrated with ticker-tape parade in New York City. It was the first time a team of female athletes were honored with a ticker-tape parade in the Canyon of Heroes in Lower Manhattan, and the first ticker-tape parade in New York City to honor female athletes since Olympic Athletes in 1984. At the parade, Mayor Bill de Blasio handed the team keys to the city at a ceremony at City Hall. [39]

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