2016–17 in English football

Last updated

Football in England
Season2016–17
Men's football
Premier League Chelsea
Championship Newcastle United
League One Sheffield United
League Two Portsmouth
National League Lincoln City
FA Cup Arsenal
EFL Trophy Coventry City
EFL Cup Manchester United
Community Shield Manchester United
2015–16 Flag of England.svg 2017–18

The 2016–17 season was the 137th season of competitive association football in England.

Contents

National teams

England national football team

Results and fixtures

2016
11 November 2016 2018 FIFA World Cup Qualification England  Flag of England.svg3–0Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland London, England
19:45 GMT Sturridge Soccerball shade.svg 23'
Lallana Soccerball shade.svg 50'
Cahill Soccerball shade.svg 61'
Report Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Attendance: 87,258
Referee: Cuneyt Cakir (Turkey)
15 November 2016 Friendly England  Flag of England.svg2–2Flag of Spain.svg  Spain London, England
20:00 GMT Lallana Soccerball shade.svg 9' (pen.)
Vardy Soccerball shade.svg 48'
Report Iago Aspas Soccerball shade.svg 89'
Isco Soccerball shade.svg 90+6'
Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Referee: Ovidiu Hațegan (Romania)
2017
22 March 2017 Friendly Germany  Flag of Germany.svg1–0Flag of England.svg  England Dortmund, Germany
19:45 BST Podolski Soccerball shade.svg 69' Report Stadium: Signal Iduna Park
Referee: Damir Skomina (Slovenia)
13 June 2017 Friendly France  Flag of France.svg3–2Flag of England.svg  England Saint-Denis, France
19:45 BST Umtiti Soccerball shade.svg 22'
Sidibé Soccerball shade.svg 43'
Dembélé Soccerball shade.svg 78'
Report Kane Soccerball shade.svg 9', 48' (pen.)Stadium: Stade de France
Referee: Davide Massa (Italy)
2018 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA) Group F
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of England.svgFlag of Slovakia.svgFlag of Scotland.svgFlag of Slovenia.svgFlag of Lithuania.svgFlag of Malta.svg
1Flag of England.svg  England 10820183+1526Qualification to 2018 FIFA World Cup 2–1 3–0 1–0 2–0 2–0
2Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 10604177+1018 0–1 3–0 1–0 4–0 3–0
3Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 105321712+518 2–2 1–0 1–0 1–1 2–0
4Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 10433127+515 0–0 1–0 2–2 4–0 2–0
5Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 10136720136 0–1 1–2 0–3 2–2 2–0
6Flag of Malta.svg  Malta 10019325221 0–4 1–3 1–5 0–1 1–1
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers

Managerial changes

Outgoing managerManner of departureDate of departureIncoming managerDate of appointment
Flag of England.svg Roy Hodgson Resigned27 June 2016 [2] Flag of England.svg Sam Allardyce 27 June 2016
Flag of England.svg Sam Allardyce Resigned [3] 26 September 2016 Flag of England.svg Gareth Southgate 30 November 2016

England women's national football team

Results and fixtures

2016
15 September EURO England  Flag of England.svg5–0Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia Nottingham
Carter Soccerball shade.svg 9', 17', 56'
J. Scott Soccerball shade.svg 13'
Carney Soccerball shade.svg 90+4'
Report Stadium: Meadow Lane
Attendance: 7,052
Referee: Vera Opeykina (Russia)
20 SeptemberEURO Belgium  Flag of Belgium (civil).svg0–2Flag of England.svg  England Leuven
Report Parris Soccerball shade.svg 65'
Carney Soccerball shade.svg 85'
Stadium: Den Dreef
Attendance: 6,754
Referee: Pernilla Larsson (Sweden)
21 October Friendly England  Flag of England.svg0–0Flag of France.svg  France Doncaster
Report Stadium: Keepmoat Stadium
Referee: Graziella Pirriatore (Italy)
25 OctoberFriendly Spain  Flag of Spain.svg1–2Flag of England.svg  England Guadalajara, Spain
Report Stadium: Estadio Pedro Escartín
29 NovemberFriendly Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg0–1Flag of England.svg  England Tilburg, Netherlands
Report Stadium: Koning Willem II Stadion
2017
22 January Friendly England  Flag of England.svg0–1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway La Manga, Spain
17:00 BST Report Hegerberg Soccerball shade.svg 26'Stadium: La Manga Stadium
24 JanuaryFriendly England  Flag of England.svg0–0Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Murcia, Spain
17:00 BST Report Stadium: Pinatar Arena

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying Group 7

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of England.svgFlag of Belgium (civil).svgFlag of Serbia.svgFlag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svgFlag of Estonia.svg
1Flag of England.svg  England 8710321+3122 Final tournament 1–1 7–0 1–0 5–0
2Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 8521275+2217 0–2 1–1 6–0 6–0
3Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 831410211110 0–7 1–3 0–1 3–0
4Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 830581799 0–1 0–5 2–4 4–0
5Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 8008033330 0–8 0–5 0–1 0–1
Source: UEFA

UEFA competitions

UEFA Champions League

Play-off round

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Steaua București Flag of Romania.svg 0–6 Flag of England.svg Manchester City 0–5 0–1

Group stage

Group A
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification ARS PAR LUD BSL
1 Flag of England.svg Arsenal 6420186+1214Advance to knockout phase 2–2 6–0 2–0
2 Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain 6330137+612 1–1 2–2 3–0
3 Flag of Bulgaria.svg Ludogorets Razgrad 603361593Transfer to Europa League 2–3 1–3 0–0
4 Flag of Switzerland.svg Basel 602431292 1–4 1–2 1–1
Source: UEFA
Group C
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification BAR MC MGB CEL
1 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 6501204+1615Advance to knockout phase 4–0 4–0 7–0
2 Flag of England.svg Manchester City 62311210+29 3–1 4–0 1–1
3 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach 612351275Transfer to Europa League 1–2 1–1 1–1
4 Flag of Scotland.svg Celtic 6033516113 0–2 3–3 0–2
Source: UEFA
Group E
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification MON LEV TOT CSKA
1 Flag of France.svg Monaco 632197+211Advance to knockout phase 1–1 2–1 3–0
2 Flag of Germany.svg Bayer Leverkusen 624084+410 3–0 0–0 2–2
3 Flag of England.svg Tottenham Hotspur 62136607Transfer to Europa League 1–2 0–1 3–1
4 Flag of Russia.svg CSKA Moscow 603351163 1–1 1–1 0–1
Source: UEFA
Group G
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification LEI POR KOB BRU
1 Flag of England.svg Leicester City 641176+113Advance to knockout phase 1–0 1–0 2–1
2 Flag of Portugal.svg Porto 632193+611 5–0 1–1 1–0
3 Flag of Denmark.svg Copenhagen 623172+59Transfer to Europa League 0–0 0–0 4–0
4 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Club Brugge 6006214120 0–3 1–2 0–2
Source: UEFA

Knockout phase

Round of 16
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Manchester City Flag of England.svg 6–6 (a) Flag of France.svg Monaco 5–3 1–3
Bayern Munich Flag of Germany.svg 10–2 Flag of England.svg Arsenal 5–1 5–1
Sevilla Flag of Spain.svg 2–3 Flag of England.svg Leicester City 2–1 0–2
Quarter-finals
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Atlético Madrid Flag of Spain.svg 2–1 Flag of England.svg Leicester City 1–0 1–1

UEFA Europa League

Qualifying rounds

Third qualifying round
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Domžale Flag of Slovenia.svg 2–4 Flag of England.svg West Ham United 2–1 0–3
Play-off round
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Astra Giurgiu Flag of Romania.svg 2–1 Flag of England.svg West Ham United 1–1 1–0

Group stage

Group A
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification FEN MU FEY ZOR
1 Flag of Turkey.svg Fenerbahçe 641186+213Advance to knockout phase 2–1 1–0 2–0
2 Flag of England.svg Manchester United 6402124+812 4–1 4–0 1–0
3 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Feyenoord 62133747 0–1 1–0 1–0
4 Flag of Ukraine.svg Zorya Luhansk 60242862 1–1 0–2 1–1
Source: UEFA
Group K
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification SPP HBS SOU INT
1 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague 640286+212Advance to knockout phase 2–0 1–0 3–1
2 Flag of Israel.svg Hapoel Be'er Sheva 62226608 0–1 0–0 3–2
3 Flag of England.svg Southampton 622264+28 3–0 1–1 2–1
4 Flag of Italy.svg Internazionale 620471146 2–1 0–2 1–0
Source: UEFA

Knockout Phase

Round of 32
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Manchester United Flag of England.svg 4–0 Flag of France.svg Saint-Étienne 3–0 1–0
Gent Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 3–2 Flag of England.svg Tottenham Hotspur 1–0 2–2
Round of 16
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Rostov Flag of Russia.svg 1–2 Flag of England.svg Manchester United 1–1 0–1
Quarter-finals
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Anderlecht Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 2–3 Flag of England.svg Manchester United 1–1 1–2 (a.e.t.)
Semi-finals
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Celta Vigo Flag of Spain.svg 1–2 Flag of England.svg Manchester United 0–1 1–1
Finals
Ajax Flag of the Netherlands.svg 0–2 Flag of England.svg Manchester United
Report
Attendance: 46,961 [4]

UEFA Youth League

UEFA Women's Champions League

Knockout phase

Round of 32
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Chelsea Flag of England.svg 1–4 Flag of Germany.svg Wolfsburg 0–3 1–1
Manchester City Flag of England.svg 6–0 Flag of Russia.svg Zvezda Perm 2–0 4–0
Round of 16
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Manchester City Flag of England.svg 2–1 Flag of Denmark.svg Brøndby 1–0 1–1
Quarter-finals
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Fortuna Hjørring Flag of Denmark.svg 0–2 Flag of England.svg Manchester City 0–1 0–1
Semi-finals
Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Manchester City Flag of England.svg 2–3 Flag of France.svg Lyon 1–3 1–0

Men's Football

League season

Promotion and relegation

LeaguePromoted to leagueRelegated from league [5]
Premier League
Championship
League One
League Two
National League Premier

Premier League

Antonio Conte enjoyed a successful start to life as Chelsea manager, winning the title in his first season at the club and earning a record number of league victories for a season, with only poor early form preventing them from also setting a new points total. Tottenham Hotspur shrugged off a disappointing Champions League campaign to push Chelsea close for the title, though they ultimately missed out – however, they ultimately finished with both the best attack and defence, with striker Harry Kane once again claiming the Golden Boot, whilst they ultimately went unbeaten at home during their final season at White Hart Lane. Manchester City improved on the previous season's finish by one place in Pep Guardiola's first season in charge, though ultimately ended the season trophyless, despite recording the third-best attack and reaching the semi-finals of the FA Cup. Liverpool made the Champions League for the first time in three years in Jürgen Klopp's first full season, though were prevented from finishing any higher than fourth by an inconsistent start to 2017, a consequence of both losing their £35 million signing Sadio Mané to international duty in January and February as well as suffering from several dropped points against bottom-half teams, in spite of going the season unbeaten against the rest of the top seven.

Despite winning seven of their final eight games, Arsenal finished in fifth place and failed to qualify for the Champions League for the first time since 1997, as fan pressure on both manager Arsène Wenger and share-owner Stan Kroenke grew. While they did win the FA Cup for the third time in four seasons, making Wenger the most successful manager in the competition's history, they endured yet another disastrous Champions League run, losing at the last-16 stage for a seventh successive year. Manchester United finished in sixth place, one place lower than the previous season, in José Mourinho's first season in charge with their failure to turn any one of their 15 draws into victories, though they did at least win the EFL Cup and won the Europa League final, winning the competition for the first time in their history and therefore securing a place in the Champions League. In only their second-ever top-flight season, AFC Bournemouth built on the success of the previous season as they secured a ninth-place finish and scored 55 goals, defying the critics who had tipped them to struggle from second-season syndrome. Much as Chelsea had the previous season, Leicester City made a poor defence of their title, despite having what turned out to be the best Champions League run of any English club this season. With the club struggling, manager Claudio Ranieri was sacked in February and replaced by coach Craig Shakespeare, who steered the club to 12th place, still the lowest finish for a defending Premier League champion, but comfortably clear of relegation.

Crystal Palace had looked in serious danger of relegation early on, but a revival after Sam Allardyce took over saw them comfortably survive, securing a club-record fifth successive top-flight season in the process. Swansea City also looked dead and buried after early struggles under Francesco Guidolin and then a disastrous spell with Bob Bradley as manager, but were ultimately saved by a late improvement under Paul Clement's management. Burnley fared the best of the promoted clubs, with only atrocious away form preventing them finishing higher as they made their home-ground of Turf Moor one of the hardest places to get a point from – and secured a second successive top-flight season for the first time in 40 years. Watford, in their first successive top-flight campaign for 30 years, successfully ensured a third consecutive Premier League season – however, as a result of poor away form, a disastrous end to the season and several spells of indifferent form throughout the campaign, the Hornets were unable to really build on the previous season despite recording their first league victories over Manchester United and at Arsenal since the 1980s.

After several successive escapes from relegation, Sunderland's resilience finally collapsed and they dropped into the Championship after a decade, spending virtually the entire season rooted to the bottom of the table, as David Moyes being the first manager to spend a full season in charge of the Black Cats since 2011 ultimately amounted to nothing. Middlesbrough also struggled throughout their first top-flight season in eight years, with a poor end to the season, the weakest goalscoring record in the division and an inability to turn one of their 13 draws into victories ultimately dooming them. Hull City were the final relegated side, never quite recovering from a disastrous pre-season which saw manager Steve Bruce quit and next to no new players signed; despite encouraging early season form under Mike Phelan, a dismal run in the winter saw him sacked and replaced by Marco Silva, who steered the club to a much better second half of the season, but it ultimately proved to be a case of too little, too late.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification or relegation
1 Chelsea (C)3830358533+5293Qualification for the Champions League group stage
2 Tottenham Hotspur 3826848626+6086
3 Manchester City 3823968039+4178
4 Liverpool 38221067842+3676Qualification for the Champions League play-off round
5 Arsenal 3823697744+3375Qualification for the Europa League group stage [lower-alpha 1]
6 Manchester United 38181555429+2569Qualification for the Champions League group stage [lower-alpha 2]
7 Everton 381710116244+1861Qualification for the Europa League third qualifying round [lower-alpha 3]
8 Southampton 381210164148746
9 Bournemouth 3812101655671246
10 West Bromwich Albion 38129174351845
11 West Ham United 381291747641745
12 Leicester City 381281848631544
13 Stoke City 3811111641561544
14 Crystal Palace 381252150631341
15 Swansea City 381252145702541
16 Burnley 381172039551640
17 Watford 381172040682840
18 Hull City (R)38972237804334Relegation to the EFL Championship
19 Middlesbrough (R)385132027532628
20 Sunderland (R)38662629694024
Source: Premier League
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Goals scored; 4) Play-offs (only if needed to decide champion, teams for relegation or teams for UEFA competitions). [6] [7]
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. Arsenal qualified for the Europa League group stage by winning the 2016–17 FA Cup. As they had also qualified there by the virtue of their league position (5th), this spot was passed to the next-highest ranked team (6th), Manchester United.
  2. Manchester United qualified for the Champions League group stage by winning the 2016–17 UEFA Europa League. Based on their league position (6th), they would have received the spot above to enter the Europa League group stage. This spot was vacated without replacement as per UEFA regulations.
  3. Manchester United, winners of the 2016–17 EFL Cup, initially attained a spot in the Europa League third qualifying round. That was passed to the next-highest ranked team in the league not already qualified for UEFA competitions (7th-placed Everton).

Championship

Newcastle United and Brighton & Hove Albion led the way for most of the season, and ultimately secured the two automatic promotion spots. Newcastle, as in their previous spell in the second tier, made an immediate return to the top-flight as champions despite a late scare with three games to go (and because of both Sunderland and Middlesbrough being relegated, it would be the first time since 1998 that the Magpies were the sole North-East team in the top-flight), while Brighton (ironically managed by Chris Hughton who steered Newcastle to promotion in their previous spell in the Championship) lost out on the title on the last day, after not winning any of their last 3 games – however, by this point, they had already earned promotion to the top-flight for only the second time in their history, and for the first time since 1983, after they narrowly missed out to Middlesbrough on goal difference on the final day of the previous season. Taking the final spot through the playoffs were Huddersfield Town, who won promotion to the top-flight for the first time in 45 years and in manager David Wagner's first full season in charge – whilst they did endure a poor end to the season and ultimately finished with a negative goal difference, the Terriers gradually eased their way through the play-off semi-final games against Sheffield Wednesday and then edged out Reading on penalties in the final at Wembley.

Leeds United managed a promotion challenge for the first time in six years and secured only their third finish in the top half of the Championship since being relegated from the Premier League in 2004, but poor runs of form either end of the season combined with an excellent late run by Fulham saw them fall short of the play-offs. Aston Villa's first season outside of the top-flight since 1988 proved to be turbulent as they changed managers after just ten games – whilst they didn't look like relegation material, their failure to turn draws into wins also prevented them from making anything resembling a promotion challenge despite striker Jonathan Kodjia scoring 19 of their goals. Birmingham City's season surprised for all the wrong reasons, as they controversially sacked manager Gary Rowett in favour of Gianfranco Zola in December despite being only just outside the play-offs, only for their form to completely collapse in the second half of the season, leaving them needing a late improvement after Zola was replaced by Harry Redknapp and then a final-day win at Bristol City to stay up.

After two seasons flirting with relegation, Rotherham United finished bottom in what was a truly awful league campaign, getting through three managers by the end of November and recording the lowest second tier points total since 3 points for a win was introduced in 1981, with only a three match unbeaten run at the end of the season stopping them from conceding 100 goals. Wigan Athletic were immediately relegated back to League One, never quite getting back to grips with life in the Championship and ultimately being cost dear by a poor end to the season, as well as a failure to win home games between October and January. Blackburn Rovers filled the final relegation spot in a season marred by increasing fan protests aimed at the owners; while a late-season revival under Tony Mowbray meant they took survival to the last day, other results ultimately went against them and sent them down to the third tier for the first time since 1980; this also made them the first former Premier League champions to drop down into the third tier (Leicester City and Manchester City had both been in the third tier since the formation of the Premier League, but did not win the league until after their spells in the third tier). In their first ever season in the Championship, Burton Albion flirted with the drop on several occasions but ultimately pulled themselves away from the bottom three to ensure their first season in the second tier would not be their last.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsPromotion, qualification or relegation
1 Newcastle United (C, P)46297108540+4594Promotion to the Premier League
2 Brighton & Hove Albion (P)4628997440+3493
3 Reading 46267136864+485Qualification for the Championship play-offs [lower-alpha 1]
4 Sheffield Wednesday 46249136045+1581
5 Huddersfield Town (O, P)46256155658281
6 Fulham 462214108557+2880
7 Leeds United 46229156147+1475
8 Norwich City 462010168569+1670
9 Derby County 461813155450+467
10 Brentford 461810187565+1064
11 Preston North End 461614166463+162
12 Cardiff City 461711186061162
13 Aston Villa 461614164748162
14 Barnsley 461513186467358
15 Wolverhampton Wanderers 461610205458458
16 Ipswich Town 4613161748581055
17 Bristol City 46159226066654
18 Queens Park Rangers 461582352661453
19 Birmingham City 4613141945641953
20 Burton Albion 4613132049631452
21 Nottingham Forest 461492362721051
22 Blackburn Rovers (R)4612151953651251Relegation to EFL League One
23 Wigan Athletic (R)4610122440571742
24 Rotherham United (R)46583340985823
Source: English Football League, Soccerway
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored; 4) Points in head-to-head matches; 5) Goal difference in head-to-head matches; 6) Goals scored in head-to-head matches; 7) Play-off.
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (P) Promoted; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. Four teams play for one spot and promotion to the Premier League.

League One

After five seasons of near-misses and playoff heartbreak, Sheffield United finally ended their exile from the Championship and returned to the second tier for the first time since 2011, going up as champions and breaking the 100-point mark in the process. Despite making a slow start, the Blades gradually surged up the table and into the top two, giving former player Chris Wilder promotion in his first season as the club's manager as well as his second successive promotion in a year. Taking second place in a battle that went to the final day, Bolton Wanderers secured promotion back to the Championship at the first opportunity and in manager Phil Parkinson's first season in charge, never once looking like falling out of the top six. Taking the final spot through the play-offs were Millwall who shrugged off losing in the final the previous year by scraping into the top six in their last few games and then scraped past opponents Bradford City in the final at Wembley, returning to the second tier after two years.

Fleetwood Town enjoyed their best season in their history, earning an unlikely fourth place, missing out on automatic promotion on the final day before only just being edged out by Bradford City in the play-offs semi-finals. In their first ever season at this level, AFC Wimbledon surprised the critics with an early challenge for promotion – whilst several dropped points and a failure to win any of their last six games pushed them back down into mid-table and below rivals Milton Keynes Dons (who looked like suffering a second successive relegation before the arrival of Hearts manager Robbie Neilson helped push them away from the drop), the club were not once in danger of suffering an immediate relegation back to League Two and ensured their stay in the third tier would last beyond one season. Northampton Town's first season in League One since 2009 started strongly as they continued their impressive unbeaten run, but a sharp drop in form in the winter months pushed them into the relegation battle, before a late good run of form helped them move back up the table. For the second season in a row, John Sheridan returned to Oldham Athletic to mastermind the Latic's great escape from relegation, despite their miserable scoring record that saw them score less than all four relegated teams.

At the bottom of the table, Chesterfield's three-year stay in League One came to an end as their decline in form following the loss of manager Paul Cook to Portsmouth finally took its toll. Coventry City fared not much better as they hit rock-bottom and fell into the bottom tier of the Football League for the first time since 1959 and just 16 years after having been in the top-flight – even victory in the Football League Trophy and a late run of good results following the return of successful former manager Mark Robins proved to not be enough, as growing fan protests towards the owners left the Sky Blues facing a bleak future. Only two years after narrowly missing out on promotion to the Championship, Swindon Town fell into League Two for the first time since 2012 with several poor results proving costly, despite the surprise appointment of former Tottenham manager Tim Sherwood as director of football. Taking the final spot were Port Vale, who looked like shrugging off the loss of manager Rob Page to Northampton Town – however, a complete collapse in form around the winter period saw them slide into the relegation zone and they were relegated on the final day after drawing at Fleetwood, as it turned out a victory would have proved enough to save them.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsPromotion, qualification or relegation
1 Sheffield United (C, P)46301069247+45100Promotion to the EFL Championship
2 Bolton Wanderers (P)462511106836+3286
3 Scunthorpe United 462410128054+2682Qualification for the League One play-offs [lower-alpha 1]
4 Fleetwood Town 462313106443+2182
5 Bradford City 46201976243+1979
6 Millwall (O, P)462013136657+973
7 Southend United 462012147053+1772
8 Oxford United 46209176552+1369
9 Rochdale 461912157162+969
10 Bristol Rovers 461812166870266
11 Peterborough United 461711186262062
12 Milton Keynes Dons 461613176058+261
13 Charlton Athletic 461418146053+760
14 Walsall 461416165158758
15 Wimbledon 461318155255357
16 Northampton Town 4614112160731353
17 Oldham Athletic 4612171731441353
18 Shrewsbury Town 4613122146631751
19 Bury 4613112261731250
20 Gillingham 4612142059792050
21 Port Vale (R)4612132145702549Relegation to EFL League Two
22 Swindon Town (R)4611112444662244
23 Coventry City (R)469122537683139
24 Chesterfield (R)469102743783537
Source: BBC Sport
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (P) Promoted; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. Four teams play for one spot and promotion to the EFL Championship.

League Two

Having lost in the play-offs just the previous year, Portsmouth shrugged off the heartbreak and won promotion to League One for the first time since 2013 and their first promotion in 14 years – despite looking set for the play-offs once more, a late surge in form from January onwards helped propel them into the top 3, taking the title on the last day. Going up in second were Plymouth Argyle, who also shrugged off their play-off loss from the previous year and ensured their six-year exile from the third tier came to an end, only missing out on the title by goal difference. Doncaster Rovers took the last automatic spot, securing an immediate return to League One – they had ironically been the first club to be promoted, but a failure to win any of their last five games pushed them into third place. Taking the last place through the play-offs were Blackpool, who also secured an immediate return to League One by defeating Exeter City at Wembley, also giving the club their first promotion since 2010 after 3 relegations in 5 years.

Despite losing their manager to Shrewsbury Town and then dismissing his replacement after only five months, Grimsby Town's first season in the Football League for six years saw them never once threatened with relegation and they secured their Football League status comfortably. Crewe Alexandra endured a turbulent season both on and off the pitch, as their strong start petered out and they were sucked into the relegation fight, which led to the dismissal of manager Steve Davis, an act seen as overdue by the fans after months of protests against the owners and their refusal to sack him. However, following the appointment of former player David Artell as manager, the Railwaymen fought their way back up the table and finished comfortably clear of the bottom two.

At the bottom of the table, after 112 years in the Football League and just three years after narrowly missing out on promotion to the Championship, Leyton Orient finally hit rock-bottom and were relegated to the fifth tier in a season that saw them change managers five times and was marked by increasing fan protests against the club owners, one of which led to the end of their final home game being finished behind closed doors. Taking the final spot on the last day were Hartlepool United, who finally saw their 96-year stay in the Football League end in the worst possible way – they had looked safe at the turn of the year but a collapse in form as well as failing to better the result of the team above them in their last game ultimately cost them their status. Having spent much of the season adrift in the relegation spaces, a late surge in form saw Newport County narrowly fight their way to safety – with a last-minute goal from player Mark O'Brien against Notts County on the final day proving to be crucial.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsPromotion, qualification or relegation
1 Portsmouth (C, P)46269117940+3987Promotion to EFL League One
2 Plymouth Argyle (P)46269117146+2587
3 Doncaster Rovers (P)462510118555+3085
4 Luton Town 46201797043+2777Qualification for League Two play-offs [lower-alpha 1]
5 Exeter City 46218177556+1971
6 Carlisle United 461817116968+171
7 Blackpool (O, P)461816126946+2370
8 Colchester United 461912156757+1069
9 Wycombe Wanderers 461912155853+569
10 Stevenage 46207196763+467
11 Cambridge United 46199185850+866
12 Mansfield Town 461715145450+466
13 Accrington Stanley 461714155956+365
14 Grimsby Town 461711185963462
15 Barnet 461415175764757
16 Notts County 461682254762256
17 Crewe Alexandra 461413195867955
18 Morecambe 4614102253732052
19 Crawley Town 4613122153711851
20 Yeovil Town 4611171849641550
21 Cheltenham Town 4612142049692050
22 Newport County 4612122251732248
23 Hartlepool United (R)4611132254752146Relegation to the National League
24 Leyton Orient (R)461063047874036
Updated to match(es) played on 6 May 2017. Source: BBC Sport
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (P) Promoted; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. Four teams play for one spot and promotion to EFL League One

National League Top Division

Six years after suffering relegation from League Two, Lincoln City returned to the Football League in a season of unprecedented success and off-field tragedy – not only did they win promotion as champions, nearly breaking the 100-point mark in the process, but they became the first non-league team in over 100 years to reach the quarter-finals of the FA Cup, even securing victory at top-flight team Burnley along the way, honouring the sudden passing of former player and manager Graham Taylor in January in the best possible way. Going up through the playoffs were Forest Green Rovers, who avenged their loss in the playoff final the previous year by comfortably beating Tranmere Rovers at Wembley in manager Mark Cooper's first full season in charge – in the process of winning promotion, not only did the club secure their place in the Football League for the first time in their history but they also ensured that their hometown of Nailsworth became the smallest settlement to ever host a Football League club.

At the bottom of the table, North Ferriby United's first-ever season in the fifth tier ended in disaster as they finished last, undone by their inability to score and having the second worst defence. Southport fared little better as their run of seven successive seasons in the fifth tier finally came to an end in the worst possible fashion, conceding nearly 100 goals and making it through not just three managers but even losing their chairman along the way. Braintree Town took the third spot on the last day of the season, only one season after finishing third in the table and losing out to eventually-promoted Grimsby Town over two legs – just one win from their final three games would have saved them from the drop. Despite victory in the FA Trophy, York City took the last spot on the final day of the campaign, suffering the embarrassment of a second successive relegation and becoming the first club to suffer back-to-back relegations from the Football League to the sixth tier; whilst their form between January and April gave them a good chance of survival, an awful first half of the season ultimately proved to be costly for their hopes, as did a staggering five results all going against them on the final day of the season.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsPromotion, qualification or relegation
1 Lincoln City (C, P)4630978340+4399Promoted to EFL League Two
2 Tranmere Rovers 4629897939+4095Qualified for the play-offs
3 Forest Green Rovers (O, P)462511108856+3286
4 Dagenham & Redbridge 46266147953+2684
5 Aldershot Town 462313106637+2982
6 Dover Athletic 46247158563+2279
7 Barrow 462015117253+1975
8 Gateshead 461913147251+2170
9 Macclesfield Town 46208186457+768
10 Bromley 46188205966762
11 Boreham Wood 461513184948+158
12 Sutton United 461513186163258
13 Wrexham 4615131847611458
14 Maidstone United 4616102059751658
15 Eastleigh 461415175663757
16 Solihull Moors 4615102162751355
17 Torquay United 461411215461753
18 Woking 4614112166801453
19 Chester 461410226371852
20 Guiseley 4613122150671751
21 York City (R)4611171855701550Relegated to National League North
22 Braintree Town (R)461392451762548Relegated to National League South
23 Southport (R)461092752974539Relegated to National League North
24 North Ferriby United (R)461233132825039
Source: National League official site
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored; 4) Number of matches won; 5) Head-to-head results [8]
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (P) Promoted; (R) Relegated.

League play-offs

Football League play-offs

EFL Championship
Final
EFL League One
Final
Bradford City 0–1 Millwall
Report Morison Soccerball shade.svg 85'
Attendance: 53,320
Referee: Simon Hooper
EFL League Two
Final
Blackpool 2–1 Exeter City
Potts Soccerball shade.svg 3'
Cullen Soccerball shade.svg 64'
Report Wheeler Soccerball shade.svg 40'

National League play-offs

National League
Final
Tranmere Rovers 1–3 Forest Green Rovers
Jennings Soccerball shade.svg 22' Woolery Soccerball shade.svg 12', 44'
Doidge Soccerball shade.svg 41'
National League North
Final
Halifax Town 2–1 (a.e.t.) Chorley
National League South
Final
Ebbsfleet United 2–1 Chelmsford City
Winfield Soccerball shade.svg 72'
McQueen Soccerball shade.svg 76'
Report Graham Soccerball shade.svg 55'
Attendance: 3,134
Referee: Richard Hulme

Cup competitions

FA Cup

Final
Arsenal 2–1 Chelsea
Sánchez Soccerball shade.svg 4'
Ramsey Soccerball shade.svg 79'
Report Costa Soccerball shade.svg 76'
Attendance: 89,472

EFL Cup

Final
Manchester United 3–2 Southampton
Ibrahimović Soccerball shade.svg 19', 87'
Lingard Soccerball shade.svg 38'
Report Gabbiadini Soccerball shade.svg 45+1', 48'
Attendance: 85,264

Community Shield

Leicester City 1–2 Manchester United
Vardy Soccerball shade.svg 52' Report Lingard Soccerball shade.svg 32'
Ibrahimović Soccerball shade.svg 83'
Attendance: 85,437

EFL Trophy

Final
Coventry City 2–1 Oxford United
Bigirimana Soccerball shade.svg 11'
G. Thomas Soccerball shade.svg 55'
Report Sercombe Soccerball shade.svg 75'
Attendance: 74,434
Referee: Chris Sarginson

FA Trophy

Final
Macclesfield Town 2–3 York City
R. Browne Soccerball shade.svg 13'
O. Norburn Soccerball shade.svg 45+1'
J. Parkin Soccerball shade.svg 8'
V. Oliver Soccerball shade.svg 22'
A. Connolly Soccerball shade.svg 86'
Attendance: 38,224

Women's Football

League season

Women's Super League

Women's Super League 1
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification or relegation
1 Manchester City (C, Q)161330364+3242Qualification for the Champions League
2 Chelsea (Q)1612134217+2537
3 Arsenal 1610243314+1932
4 Birmingham City 167631813+527
5 Liverpool 167452723+425
6 Notts County 1644816261016Club folded after end of season
7 Sunderland 16241017412410
8 Reading 161691526119
9 Doncaster Rovers (R)161015848403Relegation to FA WSL 2
Source: FA WSL
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored
(C) Champion; (Q) Qualified to the phase indicated; (R) Relegated.
Women's Super League 2
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsPromotion
1 Yeovil Town (C, P)1812334116+2539Promotion to FA WSL 1
2 Bristol City (P)1812333716+2139
3 Everton 1810443518+1734
4 Durham 1810353019+1133
5 Sheffield 187562518+726
6 Aston Villa 187382627124
7 London Bees 1864828391122
8 Millwall Lionesses 183782431716
9 Oxford United 18411320422213
10 Watford 1821151353407
Source: FA WSL
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored
(C) Champion; (P) Promoted.

FA WSL Spring Series

WSL Spring Series League 1
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1 Chelsea 8611323+2919
2 Manchester City 8611176+1119
3 Arsenal 8530229+1318
4 Liverpool 84222018+214
5 Sunderland 8233414109
6 Reading 8224101558
7 Birmingham City 814361047
8 Bristol City 8116521164
9 Yeovil Town 8017626201
Source: FA WSL
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored
WSL Spring Series League 2
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1 Everton 9711257+1822Applied for promotion to the 2017–18 FA WSL. Promotion approved. [10]
2 Doncaster Rovers Belles 9531199+1018Applied for promotion to the 2017–18 FA WSL.
3 Millwall Lionesses 9522128+417
4 Aston Villa 95221916+317
5 Durham 95131410+416
6 Brighton & Hove Albion 9243813510
7 London Bees 93151321810
8 Watford 9225121758
9 Sheffield 920791896
10 Oxford United 9027719122
Source: FA WSL
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored

Cup competitions

FA Women's Cup

Final
Birmingham City 1–4 Manchester City
Report
Attendance: 35,271

FA WSL Cup

Final

Manchester City won their second cup after 2014 and completed the double. [11]

Birmingham City 0–1 (a.e.t.) Manchester City
Report
Attendance: 4,214
Referee: Rebecca Welch

Managerial changes

This is a list of changes of managers within English league football:

TeamOutgoing managerManner of departureDate of departurePosition in tableIncoming managerDate of appointment
Blackburn Rovers Flag of Scotland.svg Paul Lambert Mutual consent7 May 2016 [12] Pre-season Flag of Ireland.svg Owen Coyle 2 June 2016 [13]
Cardiff City Flag of England.svg Russell Slade Promoted to head of football8 May 2016 [14] Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Paul Trollope 18 May 2016 [15]
Nottingham Forest Flag of England.svg Paul Williams Mutual consent12 May 2016 [16] Flag of France.svg Philippe Montanier 27 June 2016 [17]
Northampton Town Flag of England.svg Chris Wilder Signed by Sheffield United12 May 2016 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Rob Page 19 May 2016
Sheffield United Flag of England.svg Nigel Adkins Sacked12 May 2016 Flag of England.svg Chris Wilder 12 May 2016
Rotherham United Flag of England.svg Neil Warnock End of contract18 May 2016 [18] Flag of England.svg Alan Stubbs 1 June 2016 [19]
Blackpool Flag of England.svg Neil McDonald Mutual consent18 May 2016 Flag of England.svg Gary Bowyer 1 June 2016
Port Vale Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Rob Page Signed by Northampton Town19 May 2016 Flag of Portugal.svg Bruno Ribeiro 20 June 2016
Manchester United Flag of the Netherlands.svg Louis van Gaal Sacked23 May 2016 Flag of Portugal.svg José Mourinho 27 May 2016
Reading Flag of England.svg Brian McDermott 27 May 2016 [20] Flag of the Netherlands.svg Jaap Stam 13 June 2016 [21]
Derby County Flag of England.svg Darren Wassall End of contract27 May 2016 [22] Flag of England.svg Nigel Pearson 27 May 2016 [23]
Oldham Athletic Flag of England.svg John Sheridan Signed by Notts County29 May 2016 Ulster Banner.svg Steve Robinson 9 July 2016
Leeds United Flag of Scotland.svg Steve Evans Sacked31 May 2016 [24] Flag of England.svg Garry Monk 2 June 2016 [25]
Aston Villa Flag of Scotland.svg Eric Black End of caretaker spell2 June 2016 Flag of Italy.svg Roberto Di Matteo 2 June 2016 [26]
Bradford City Flag of England.svg Phil Parkinson Signed by Bolton Wanderers10 June 2016 Flag of Scotland.svg Stuart McCall 20 June 2016
Southampton Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ronald Koeman Signed by Everton14 June 2016 Flag of France.svg Claude Puel 30 June 2016
Chelsea Flag of the Netherlands.svg Guus Hiddink End of caretaker spell30 June 2016 [27] Flag of Italy.svg Antonio Conte 1 July 2016 [27]
Manchester City Flag of Chile.svg Manuel Pellegrini Mutual consent30 June 2016 [28] Flag of Spain.svg Pep Guardiola 1 July 2016 [29]
Watford Flag of Spain.svg Quique Sánchez Flores 30 June 2016 [30] Flag of Italy.svg Walter Mazzarri 1 July 2016 [31]
Hull City Flag of England.svg Steve Bruce 22 July 2016 [32] Flag of England.svg Mike Phelan 22 July 2016
Sunderland Flag of England.svg Sam Allardyce Signed by England22 July 2016 Flag of Scotland.svg David Moyes 23 July 2016
Fleetwood Town Flag of Scotland.svg Steven Pressley Resigned26 July 2016 Flag of Germany.svg Uwe Rosler 30 July 2016
Wolverhampton Wanderers Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Kenny Jackett Sacked30 July 2016 Flag of Italy.svg Walter Zenga 30 July 2016
Leyton Orient Flag of England.svg Andy Hessenthaler 26 September 201614th Flag of Italy.svg Alberto Cavasin 2 October 2016
Newport County Ulster Banner.svg Warren Feeney 28 September 201624th Flag of England.svg Graham Westley 7 October 2016
Coventry City Flag of England.svg Tony Mowbray Resigned29 September 201624th Flag of England.svg Russell Slade 21 December 2016
Aston Villa Flag of Italy.svg Roberto Di Matteo Sacked3 October 201619th Flag of England.svg Steve Bruce 12 October 2016
Swansea City Flag of Italy.svg Francesco Guidolin 3 October 201617th Flag of the United States.svg Bob Bradley 3 October 2016
Cardiff City Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Paul Trollope 4 October 201623rd Flag of England.svg Neil Warnock 5 October 2016
Shrewsbury Town Flag of Scotland.svg Micky Mellon Signed by Tranmere Rovers6 October 201622nd Flag of England.svg Paul Hurst 24 October 2016
Derby County Flag of England.svg Nigel Pearson Mutual consent8 October 201620th Flag of England.svg Steve McClaren 12 October 2016
Rotherham United Flag of England.svg Alan Stubbs Sacked19 October 201624th Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Kenny Jackett 21 October 2016
Milton Keynes Dons Flag of England.svg Karl Robinson Mutual consent23 October 201619th Flag of Scotland.svg Robbie Neilson 3 December 2016
Grimsby Town Flag of England.svg Paul Hurst Signed by Shrewsbury Town24 October 20168th Flag of England.svg Marcus Bignot 7 November 2016
Wolverhampton Wanderers Flag of Italy.svg Walter Zenga Sacked25 October 201618th Flag of Scotland.svg Paul Lambert 5 November 2016
Wigan Athletic Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Caldwell 25 October 201623rd Flag of England.svg Warren Joyce 2 November 2016
Queens Park Rangers Flag of the Netherlands.svg Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink 6 November 201617th Flag of England.svg Ian Holloway 11 November 2016
Charlton Athletic Flag of England.svg Russell Slade 14 November 201615th Flag of England.svg Karl Robinson 24 November 2016
Mansfield Town Flag of England.svg Adam Murray Resigned14 November 201618th Flag of Scotland.svg Steve Evans 16 November 2016
Bury Flag of England.svg David Flitcroft Mutual consent16 November 201616th Flag of England.svg Chris Brass 15 December 2016
Leyton Orient Flag of Italy.svg Alberto Cavasin Sacked23 November 201622nd Flag of England.svg Andy Edwards 23 November 2016
Rotherham United Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Kenny Jackett Resigned29 November 201624th Flag of England.svg Paul Warne 14 January 2017
Barnet Flag of England.svg Martin Allen Signed by Eastleigh1 December 20168th Flag of England.svg Kevin Nugent 16 February 2016
Birmingham City Flag of England.svg Gary Rowett Sacked14 December 20167th Flag of Italy.svg Gianfranco Zola 14 December 2016
Crystal Palace Flag of England.svg Alan Pardew 22 December 201617th Flag of England.svg Sam Allardyce 23 December 2016
Port Vale Flag of Portugal.svg Bruno Ribeiro Resigned26 December 201617th Flag of England.svg Michael Brown 26 December 2016
Swansea City Flag of the United States.svg Bob Bradley Sacked27 December 201619th Flag of England.svg Paul Clement 2 January 2017 [33]
Notts County Flag of England.svg John Sheridan 2 January 201722nd Flag of England.svg Kevin Nolan 12 January 2017
Gillingham Flag of England.svg Justin Edinburgh 3 January 201717th Flag of England.svg Adrian Pennock 4 January 2017
Hull City Flag of England.svg Mike Phelan 3 January 201720th Flag of Portugal.svg Marco Silva 5 January 2017
Crewe Alexandra Flag of England.svg Steve Davis 8 January 201718th Flag of England.svg David Artell 8 January 2017
Chesterfield Ulster Banner.svg Danny Wilson 8 January 201722nd Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Caldwell 17 January 2017
Northampton Town Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Rob Page 9 January 201716th Flag of England.svg Justin Edinburgh 13 January 2017
Oldham Athletic Ulster Banner.svg Steve Robinson 12 January 201724th Flag of England.svg John Sheridan 12 January 2017
Nottingham Forest Flag of France.svg Philippe Montanier 14 January 201720th Flag of England.svg Gary Brazil 9 February 2017
Hartlepool United Flag of England.svg Craig Hignett Mutual consent15 January 201719th Flag of England.svg Dave Jones 18 January 2017
Leyton Orient Flag of England.svg Andy Edwards Resigned29 January 201723rd Flag of England.svg Daniel Webb 29 January 2017
Bury Flag of England.svg Chris Brass End of interim role15 February 201721st Flag of England.svg Lee Clark 15 February 2017
Blackburn Rovers Flag of Ireland.svg Owen Coyle Mutual consent21 February 201723rd Flag of England.svg Tony Mowbray 22 February 2017
Leicester City Flag of Italy.svg Claudio Ranieri Sacked23 February 2017 [34] 17th Flag of England.svg Craig Shakespeare 12 March 2017
Coventry City Flag of England.svg Russell Slade 5 March 201724th Flag of England.svg Mark Robins 6 March 2017
Newport County Flag of England.svg Graham Westley 9 March 201724th Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Michael Flynn 9 March 2017
Norwich City Flag of Scotland.svg Alex Neil 10 March 20178th Flag of Scotland.svg Alan Irvine 10 March 2017
Derby County Flag of England.svg Steve McClaren 12 March 201710th Flag of England.svg Gary Rowett 14 March 2017
Wigan Athletic Flag of England.svg Warren Joyce Mutual consent13 March 201723rd Flag of England.svg Graham Barrow 13 March 2017
Nottingham Forest Flag of England.svg Gary Brazil End of interim role14 March 201720th Flag of England.svg Mark Warburton 14 March 2017
Middlesbrough Flag of Spain.svg Aitor Karanka Sacked16 March 201719th Flag of England.svg Steve Agnew 16 March 2017
Leyton Orient Flag of England.svg Daniel Webb Resigned30 March 201724th Flag of Turkey.svg Omer Riza 30 March 2017
Grimsby Town Flag of England.svg Marcus Bignot Sacked10 April 201714th Flag of England.svg Russell Slade 12 April 2017
Barnet Flag of England.svg Kevin Nugent Mutual consent15 April 201716th Flag of England.svg Rossi Eames 19 May 2017
Birmingham City Flag of Italy.svg Gianfranco Zola Resigned17 April 201720th Flag of England.svg Harry Redknapp 18 April 2017
Hartlepool United Flag of England.svg Dave Jones Mutual consent24 April 201723rd Flag of England.svg Craig Harrison 26 May 2017
Crawley Town Flag of England.svg Dermot Drummy 4 May 201721st Flag of Australia (converted).svg Harry Kewell 23 May 2017
Swindon Town Flag of England.svg Luke Williams 5 May 201722nd Flag of England.svg David Flitcroft 5 June 2017

Diary of the season

Deaths

Retirements

Related Research Articles

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The 2004–05 season was the 125th season of competitive football in England.

2006–07 in English football

The 2006–07 season was the 127th season of competitive association football in England.

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The 2000–01 FA Premier League was the ninth FA Premier League season and the third season running which ended with Manchester United as champions and Arsenal as runners-up. Sir Alex Ferguson became the first manager to win three successive English league titles with the same club. Liverpool, meanwhile, managed a unique cup treble – winning the FA Cup, League Cup and UEFA Cup. They also finished third in the Premier League and qualified for the Champions League. Nike replaced Mitre as manufacturer of the official Premier League match ball, a contract that has since been extended multiple times, with the most recent renewal made in November 2018 to the end of the 2024–25 season.

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The 1985–86 season was the 106th season of competitive football in England.

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2007–08 Premier League 16th season of the Premier League

The 2007–08 Premier League season was the 16th since its establishment. The first matches of the season were played on 11 August 2007, and the season ended on 11 May 2008. Manchester United went into the 2007–08 season as the Premier League's defending champions, having won their ninth Premier League title and sixteenth league championship overall the previous season. This season was also the third consecutive season to see the "Big Four" continue their stranglehold on the top four spots and places in the UEFA Champions League.

The 2009–10 season was the 130th season of competitive football in England.

The 2010–11 season was the 131st season of competitive football in England.

The 2011–12 season was the 132nd season of competitive football in England.

Following the breakaway from the Football League, the new top tier of English football was named the Premier League for the start of the 1992–93 season. The following page details the football records and statistics of the Premier League.

The 2012–13 season was the 133rd season of competitive football in England.

The 2013–14 season was the 134th season of competitive football in England.

The 2014–15 season was the 135th season of competitive association football in England.

The 2015–16 season was the 136th season of competitive association football in England.

The 2017–18 season was the 138th season of competitive association football in England.

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References

  1. "Regulations – 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia" (PDF). FIFA.com.
  2. "Euro 2016: Roy Hodgson resigns after England lose to Iceland". BBC. 28 June 2016. Retrieved 5 July 2020.
  3. http://www.skysports.com/football/news/12016/10595824/sam-allardyce-leaves-england-job-after-one-game-in-charge
  4. "Full Time Report Final – Ajax v Manchester United" (PDF). UEFA.org. Union of European Football Associations. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017.