2017–18 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

Last updated
2017–18 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season
2017-2018 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season summary.png
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formedDecember 27, 2017
Last system dissipatedMay 1, 2018
Strongest storm
NameBerguitta [nb 1]
  Maximum winds165 km/h (105 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
  Lowest pressure940 hPa (mbar)
Seasonal statistics
Total disturbances9 official, 1 unofficial
Total depressions9
Total storms8
Tropical cyclones6
Intense tropical cyclones3
Very intense tropical cyclones0
Total fatalities108 total
Total damage$63.9 million (2018 USD)
Related articles
South-West Indian Ocean tropical cyclone seasons
2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20

The 2017–18 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was a below-average season that produced only 8 tropical storms, of which 6 became tropical cyclones. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone and subtropical cyclone formation. It officially began on November 15, 2017, and officially ended on May 15, 2018, in Mauritius and the Seychelles. For the rest of the basin, the season ended on April 30, 2018. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical and subtropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical and subtropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in La Réunion.

Tropical cyclone Is a rotating storm system

A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system characterized by a low-pressure center, a closed low-level atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. Depending on its location and strength, a tropical cyclone is referred to by different names, including hurricane, typhoon, tropical storm, cyclonic storm, tropical depression, and simply cyclone. A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean, and a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean; in the south Pacific or Indian Ocean, comparable storms are referred to simply as "tropical cyclones" or "severe cyclonic storms".

Subtropical cyclone

A subtropical cyclone is a weather system that has some characteristics of a tropical and an extratropical cyclone.

Mauritius Island nation in the Indian Ocean

Mauritius, officially the Republic of Mauritius, is an island nation in the Indian Ocean. The main Island of Mauritius is located about 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) off the southeast coast of the African continent. The Republic of Mauritius also includes the islands of Rodrigues, Agalega and St. Brandon. The capital and largest city Port Louis is located on the main island of Mauritius.

Contents

Seasonal summary

Tropical cyclone scales#Comparisons across basins2017-18 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

Systems

Tropical Cyclone Ava

Tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 2 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Ava 2018-01-05 1021Z.jpg   Ava 2018 track.png
DurationDecember 27 – January 9
Peak intensity155 km/h (100 mph) (10-min)  965  hPa  (mbar)

The cyclone's powerful winds, estimated up to 190 km/h (120 mph), caused extensive damage in and around Toamasina. [1] Hundreds of power poles were snapped across Toamasina; Jirama estimated repairs to be in excess of 15 billion Ariary (US$4.62 million). [2] Heavy rains triggered flash floods in Tamatave and Antananarivo. Throughout Madagascar, at least 51 people died while 22 more were listed as missing. [1] Approximately 161,000 people suffered direct impacts from the cyclone, [3] with 54,000 people left homeless. [1]

Toamasina Place in Atsinanana, Madagascar

Toamasina, meaning "like salt" or "salty", unofficially and in French Tamatave, is the capital of the Atsinanana region on the east coast of Madagascar on the Indian Ocean. The city is the chief seaport of the country, situated 215 km (134 mi) northeast of its capital and biggest city Antananarivo. According to the 2013 official estimate, Toamasina had a population of 274,667. The city is served by Toamasina Airport.

Jirama is a state-owned electric utility and water services company in Madagascar.

Antananarivo Place in Madagascar

Antananarivo, also known by its colonial shorthand form Tana, is the capital and largest city of Madagascar. The larger urban area surrounding the city, known as Antananarivo-Renivohitra, is the capital of Analamanga region. The city is located 1,280 m (4,199 ft) above the sea level in the center of the island and has been the country's largest population center since at least the 18th century.

Tropical Cyclone Irving

Tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 2 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Irving 2018-01-08 0518Z.jpg   Irving 2018 track.png
DurationJanuary 6 (Entered basin) – January 9
Peak intensity150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min)  964  hPa  (mbar)

Irving was named by the Bureau of Meteorology of Australia on January 6 and crossed over into to the South-West Indian Ocean basin a few hours later.[ citation needed ]

The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) is an Executive Agency of the Australian Government responsible for providing weather services to Australia and surrounding areas. It was established in 1906 under the Meteorology Act, and brought together the state meteorological services that existed before then. The states officially transferred their weather recording responsibilities to the Bureau of Meteorology on 1 January 1908.

Intense Tropical Cyclone Berguitta

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Berguitta 2018-01-15 0950Z.jpg   Berguitta 2018 track.png
DurationJanuary 9 – January 20
Peak intensity165 km/h (105 mph) (10-min)  940  hPa  (mbar)

On January 18, Berguitta passing just southeast the Mauritius, bringing strong winds and heavy rains. The textile sector suffering a loss of Rs200 million (US$6.08 million). [4] Later, Berguitta passed about 50 km (31 mi) southeast of Réunion, [5] strong winds knocked down trees and left over 72,000 people without power. [6] A person was killed during the storm, and the agricultural loss of the island were at 16.7 million (US$20.4 million). [7] [8]

The rupee is the currency of Mauritius. One rupee is subdivided into 100 cents. Several other currencies are also called rupee.

Tropical Depression 04

Tropical depression (MFR)
04R 2018-01-15 1130Z.jpg   04R 2018 track.png
DurationJanuary 14 – January 16
Peak intensity55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min)  999  hPa  (mbar)

Intense Tropical Cyclone Cebile

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 4 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Cebile 2018-01-31 0524Z.jpg   Cebile 2018 track.png
DurationJanuary 25 – February 4
Peak intensity185 km/h (115 mph) (10-min)  944  hPa  (mbar)

Intense Tropical Cyclone Dumazile

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Dumazile 2018-03-05 1013Z.jpg   Dumazile 2018 track.png
DurationMarch 1 – March 6
Peak intensity165 km/h (105 mph) (10-min)  945  hPa  (mbar)

Dumazile formed from a low on March 2. After formation, Dumazile began rounding a subtropical ridge to the east.[ citation needed ] Dumazile brought heavy rain to Madagascar. [9] Dumazile then began weakening as a result of increasing shear wind from a low pressure system to the southwest and became post-tropical early on March 7.[ citation needed ] Dumazile produced flooding rainfall and gusty winds on Réunion. [10]

Severe Tropical Storm Eliakim

Severe tropical storm (MFR)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Eliakim 2018-03-16 1006Z.jpg   Eliakim 2018 track.png
DurationMarch 13 – March 20
Peak intensity110 km/h (70 mph) (10-min)  980  hPa  (mbar)

At least 21 people were killed and approximately 19,000 people were affected in Madagascar. [11] The eastern coastal districts were the hardest hit. More than 260 homes were destroyed and a further 630 were flooded. [12] Road damages were about Ar10 billion (US$3.21 million). [13]

High waves from Eliakim affected coastal roads in Réunion, and wind gusts reached 151 km/h (94 mph) on the island. [14]

Tropical Cyclone Fakir

Tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Fakir 2018-04-23 1905Z.jpg   Fakir 2018 track.png
DurationApril 20 – April 25
Peak intensity130 km/h (80 mph) (10-min)  975  hPa  (mbar)

On April 24, Fakir passed quickly just east of Réunion. A late-season storm, Fakir dropped 415 mm (16.3 in) of rainfall in a 24 hour period, as well as producing 176 km/h (109 mph) wind gusts. The heavy rainfall caused flooding and landslides. [15] Two people were died due to mudslides, and the economic loss were about €20 million (US$24.5 million). [16] [17]

Severe Tropical Storm Flamboyan

Severe tropical storm (MFR)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Flamboyan 2018-04-29 Terra.jpg   Flamboyan 2018 track.png
DurationApril 28 (Entered basin) – May 1
Peak intensity110 km/h (70 mph) (10-min)  983  hPa  (mbar)

Late on April 28, Flamboyan entered the South-West Indian Ocean basin. Flamboyan retained its name after moving into the basin, becoming the first moderate tropical storm in the South-West Indian Ocean basin to be named by TCWC Jakarta in history. [nb 2] On April 29, Flamboyan intensified into a severe tropical storm.

Other systems

A low-pressure system, classified as a tropical low by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, [18] moved west-southwestward across the 90th meridian east into the South-West Indian Ocean basin on August 8. [19] At 10:00 UTC on the following day, Météo-France Réunion upgraded the low-pressure system to a zone of disturbed weather, with sustained winds of up to 55 km/h (35 mph) being detected on the southern side of the circulation by scatterometer. [20] At this time, the disturbance was located approximately 2,375 km (1,475 mi) west of Jakarta, Indonesia. [20] Météo-France noted that the revival of convective activity in the basin was likely due to the interaction between an eastward-moving Kelvin wave and a westward-moving Rossby wave. [20]

Storm names

Within the South-West Indian Ocean, tropical depressions and subtropical depressions that are judged to have 10-minute sustained wind speeds of 65 km/h (40 mph) by the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center on La Réunion Island, France (RSMC La Réunion) are usually assigned a name. However, it is the Sub-Regional Tropical Cyclone Advisory Centers in Mauritius and Madagascar who name the systems. The Sub-Regional Tropical Cyclone Advisory Center in Mauritius names a storm should it intensify into a moderate tropical storm between 55°E and 90°E. If instead a cyclone intensifies into a moderate tropical storm between 30°E and 55°E then the Sub-Regional Tropical Cyclone Advisory Center in Madagascar assigns the appropriate name to the storm. Beginning from the 2016–17 season, name lists within the South-West Indian Ocean will be rotated on a triennial basis. Storm names are only used once, so any storm name used this year will be removed from rotation and replaced with a new name for the 2020–21 season. The unused names are expected to be reused in the list for the 2020–21 season. [21]

  • Ava
  • Berguitta
  • Cebile
  • Dumazile
  • Eliakim
  • Fakir
  • Guambe (unused)
  • Habana (unused)
  • Iman (unused)
  • Jobo (unused)
  • Kanga (unused)
  • Ludzi (unused)
  • Melina (unused)
  • Nathan (unused)
  • Onias (unused)
  • Pelagie (unused)
  • Quamar (unused)
  • Rita (unused)
  • Solani (unused)
  • Tarik (unused)
  • Urilia (unused)
  • Vuyane (unused)
  • Wagner (unused)
  • Xusa (unused)
  • Yarona (unused)
  • Zacarias (unused)

Seasonal effects

This table lists all of the tropical cyclones and subtropical cyclones that were monitored during the 2017–2018 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season. Information on their intensity, duration, name, areas affected, primarily comes from RSMC La Réunion. Death and damage reports come from either press reports or the relevant national disaster management agency while the damage totals are given in 2017 or 2018 USD.

NameDates active Peak classification Sustained
wind speeds
PressureAreas affectedDamage
(USD)
DeathsRefs
AvaDecember 27 – January 9Tropical cyclone155 km/h (100 mph)965 hPa (28.50 inHg) Madagascar $4.62 million73 [22] [23]
IrvingJanuary 6 – 9Tropical cyclone150 km/h (90 mph)964 hPa (28.47 inHg)NoneNoneNone
BerguittaJanuary 9 – 20Intense tropical cyclone165 km/h (105 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg) Mauritius, Réunion $26.5 million1 [24] [23]
04January 14 – 16Tropical depression55 km/h (35 mph)999 hPa (29.50 inHg)Madagascar, Mozambique $5.1 million11 [23]
CebileJanuary 25 – February 4Intense tropical cyclone185 km/h (115 mph)944 hPa (27.88 inHg)NoneNoneNone
DumazileMarch 1 – 6Intense tropical cyclone165 km/h (105 mph)945 hPa (27.91 inHg)Madagascar, RéunionNoneNone
EliakimMarch 13 – 20Severe tropical storm110 km/h (70 mph)980 hPa (28.94 inHg)Madagascar$3.21 million21 [25] [26]
FakirApril 20 – 24Tropical cyclone130 km/h (80 mph)975 hPa (28.79 inHg)Madagascar, Réunion, Mauritius$24.5 million2 [27] [28]
FlamboyanApril 28 – May 1Severe tropical storm110 km/h (70 mph)983 hPa (29.03 inHg)NoneNoneNone
Season aggregates
9 systemsDecember 27 – May 1185 km/h (115 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg)$63.9 million108

See also

Footnotes

  1. The strongest winds were actually from Cebile, at 185 km/h (115 mph).
  2. Durga in April 2008 exited from this basin. Bakung in December 2014 entered as a remnant low.

Related Research Articles

Tropical cyclones and subtropical cyclones are named by various warning centers to provide ease of communication between forecasters and the general public regarding forecasts, watches, and warnings. The names are intended to reduce confusion in the event of concurrent storms in the same basin. Generally once storms produce sustained wind speeds of more than 33 knots, names are assigned in order from predetermined lists depending on which basin they originate. However, standards vary from basin to basin: some tropical depressions are named in the Western Pacific, while tropical cyclones must have a significant amount of gale-force winds occurring around the centre before they are named in the Southern Hemisphere.

2005–06 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the South-West Indian ocean

The 2005–06 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was the fifth least-active on record. The Météo-France office on the island of Réunion tracked 13 tropical disturbances, of which six intensified into a moderate tropical storm. Three of these systems proceeded to attain tropical cyclone status – reaching 10 minute maximum sustained winds of at least 120 km/h (75 mph). The American-based Joint Typhoon Warning Center also tracked eight storms in the basin. Activity was below normal due to a powerful Walker circulation, which increased convection over the neighboring Australian basin, but suppressed activity in the western Indian Ocean. As a result, most of the storms developed near or entered from the Australian basin, crossing 90°E to enter the South-West Indian Ocean.

2003–04 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the South-West Indian ocean

The 2003–04 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season featured the most intense tropical cyclone in the South-West Indian Ocean, Cyclone Gafilo, as well as nine other named storms. Tropical activity began on September 28 when Moderate Tropical Storm Abaimba formed at a low latitude. Activity continued until late May, following Severe Tropical Storm Juba, which marked the third year in a row that a storm formed in May. The final disturbance, one of sixteen, dissipated on May 24. Activity was near average, and the season was one of the longest on record.

2001–02 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the South-West Indian ocean

The 2001–02 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season had the earliest named storm since 1992. Many storms formed in the north-east portion of the basin, and several more originated around Australia. The basin is defined as the waters of the Indian Ocean west of longitude 90°E to the coast of Africa and south of the equator. Eleven tropical storms formed, compared to an average of nine. Tropical systems were present during 73 days, which was significantly higher than the average of 58 for this basin.

South-West Indian Ocean tropical cyclone type of tropical cyclone located in South West Indian Ocean and measured by Météo-France La Reunion scale

In the south-west Indian Ocean, tropical cyclones form south of the equator and west of 90° E to the coast of Africa.

Cyclone Gamede South-West Indian cyclone in 2007

Cyclone Gamede was among the wettest tropical cyclones on record, dropping more than 5.5 m (18 ft) of rain in a nine-day period on Réunion island in the southwest Indian Ocean. Only Cyclone Hyacinthe has a higher recorded rainfall total. The seventh named storm of the 2006–07 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season, Gamede formed south of Diego Garcia on February 19 as a tropical disturbance. It tracked generally westward and steadily intensified, reaching tropical cyclone status on February 23. For two days, Gamede stalled northwest of the Mascarene Islands as an intense tropical cyclone, during which it reached 10 minute maximum sustained winds of winds of 165 km/h (105 mph), according to the Météo-France meteorological office in Réunion. The American-based Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) estimated peak 1 minute winds of 195 km/h (120 mph), equivalent to a Category 3 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. For four days, Gamede remained within 400 km (250 mi) of Réunion before accelerating southward. On March 2, Gamede transitioned into an extratropical cyclone to the southeast of Madagascar. The MFR tracked the storm for four more days.

2008–09 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the South-West Indian ocean

The 2008–09 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was a slightly above average event in tropical cyclone formation. It began on November 15, 2008, and officially ended on April 30, 2009, with the exception for Mauritius and the Seychelles, for which it ended on May 15, 2009. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin were monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion.

1998–99 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the South-West Indian ocean

The 1998–99 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was a quiet season that had the fourth-lowest number of days with tropical storm or tropical cyclone activity. Most of the storms formed either in the Mozambique Channel or in the far eastern portion of the basin, with five storms crossing from the adjacent Australian basin east of 90° E. As a result, few storms impacted Madagascar, and none made landfall on the African continent. Throughout most of the season, there was below-normal sea surface temperatures in the Indian Ocean east of Madagascar. In February, typically the peak in activity, Réunion island recorded its highest average monthly pressure since 1953. Due to generally unfavorable conditions, there were only six tropical storms tracked by the Météo-France office (MFR) on Réunion. There were only two tropical cyclones – a storm with winds of at least 120 km/h (75 mph).

2009–10 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the South-West Indian ocean

The 2009–10 South-West Indian Ocean tropical cyclone season was a near average event in tropical cyclone formation. the season officially started on July 1, 2009, and ended on June 30, 2010, after incorporating the tropical cyclone season which ran from November 1 to April 30 for all areas except for Mauritius and the Seychelles, for which it ended on May 15, 2010. In this basin which officially runs from 30 to 90E and is to the south of the equator, the main warning center is the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center on La Reunion Island; however they delegate the naming of Cyclones to the Meteorological services of Mauritius and Madagascar.

2010–11 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the South-West Indian ocean

The 2010–11 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was the least active cyclone season on record in the basin, tied with 1982–83, producing only four systems of gale intensity. This was due to cooler than normal water temperatures and the Walker circulation – a broad atmospheric circulation – causing unusually moist conditions in the eastern Indian Ocean and unusually dry conditions in the western Indian Ocean. The basin includes the waters of the ocean south of the equator and west of 90º E to the eastern coast of Africa.

2011–12 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the South-West Indian ocean

The 2011–12 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was a slightly above average event in tropical cyclone formation. It began on November 15, 2011, and ended on April 30, 2012, with the exception for Mauritius and the Seychelles, for which it ended on May 15, 2012. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the region; however, Severe Tropical Storm Kuena developed in early June after the season had officially ended. The basin is defined as the area west of 90°E and south of the Equator in the Indian Ocean, which includes the waters around Madagascar westward to the east coast of Africa. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion.

1980–81 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the South-West Indian ocean

The 1980–81 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an average cyclone season.

1979–80 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the South-West Indian ocean

The 1979–80 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an above average cyclone season. The season officially ran from November 1, 1979, to April 30, 1980.

Cyclone Hollanda South-West Indian cyclone in 1994

Cyclone Hollanda was the worst tropical cyclone in Mauritius in 19 years. It formed on February 6, 1994, in the central Indian Ocean in the southern hemisphere. The cyclone moved southwestward for much of its duration, striking Mauritius on February 10 at peak intensity with winds of 218 km/h (135 mph). It later passed just southeast of Réunion before turning to the south and weakening. The cyclone became extratropical on February 14 in the southern Indian Ocean.

2012–13 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the South-West Indian ocean

The 2012–13 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was a slightly above average event in tropical cyclone formation in the Southern hemisphere tropical cyclone year starting on July 1, 2012, and ending on June 30, 2013. Within this basin, tropical and subtropical disturbances are officially monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre on Réunion island, while the Mauritius and Madagascar weather services assign names to significant tropical and subtropical disturbances. The first tropical disturbance of the season developed on October 12 and rapidly developed into the earliest known intense tropical cyclone on record during October 14.

2014–15 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

The 2014–15 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an above average event in tropical cyclone formation. It began on November 15, 2014, and ended on April 30, 2015, with the exception for Mauritius and the Seychelles, for which it ended on May 15, 2015. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical and subtropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical and subtropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion.

2015–16 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

The 2015–16 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was a slightly below average event in tropical cyclone formation. The annual cyclone season began on November 15, 2015, with the first storm, Annabelle, forming four days following. The final and strongest storm, Fantala, dissipated on April 23, 2016, a week before the season ended on April 30 for most of the region. In Mauritius and the Seychelles, the cyclone season ended half a month later, on May 15. The season's activity was influenced by an ongoing El Niño, and a positive Indian Ocean Dipole.

2016–17 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

The 2016–17 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was a below-average season, with five tropical storms, three of which intensified into tropical cyclones. It officially began on November 15, 2016, and ended on April 30, 2017, with the exception for Mauritius and the Seychelles, for which it ended on May 15, 2017. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical and subtropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical and subtropical cyclones in this basin were monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion, though the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued unofficial advisories.

2018–19 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season Period of the cyclone season in the southwest Indian Ocean between 2018 and 2019

The 2018–19 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season is the costliest and most active season ever recorded since records began in 1967. Additionally, it is also the second-deadliest cyclone season recorded in the South-West Indian Ocean, behind only the 1891–92 season, in which the 1892 Mauritius cyclone devastated the island of Mauritius. Currently, this cyclone season is an ongoing event of the annual cycle of tropical cyclone and subtropical cyclone formation in the South-West Indian Ocean basin. It officially began on November 15, 2018, and ended on April 30, 2019, with the exception for Mauritius and the Seychelles, for which it will end on May 15, 2019. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical and subtropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical and subtropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion.

Tropical cyclones in the Mascarene Islands

Since 1656, at least 300 tropical cyclones have affected the Mascarene Islands in the southern Indian Ocean. The archipelago consists of several islands, including Mauritius, Réunion, and Rodrigues. Mauritius claims responsibility for several Outer Islands, including St. Brandon and Agaléga, and has disputed territorial claims of Tromelin Island and the Chagos Archipelago. The deadliest tropical cyclone to affect the region was one that struck Mauritius in 1892, which killed 1,200 people, left 50,000 people homeless, and destroyed one-third of the capital Port Louis.

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