2017–18 South Pacific cyclone season

Last updated
2017–18 South Pacific cyclone season
2017-2018 South Pacific cyclone season summary.png
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formedDecember 16, 2017
Last system dissipatedApril 20, 2018
Strongest storm
Name Gita
  Maximum winds205 km/h (125 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
  Lowest pressure927 hPa (mbar)
Seasonal statistics
Total disturbances14
Total depressions10
Tropical cyclones6
Severe tropical cyclones3
Total fatalities11 total
Total damage$377 million (2017 USD)
Related articles
South Pacific tropical cyclone seasons
2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20

The 2017–18 South Pacific cyclone season was a slightly below-average season that produced 6 tropical cyclones, 3 of which became severe tropical cyclones. The season officially began on November 1, 2017 and ended on April 30, 2018; however, a tropical cyclone could form at any time between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018 and would count towards the season total. During the season, tropical cyclones were officially monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service, MetService and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, while the United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) also monitored the basin and issued warnings for American interests. The FMS attaches a number and an F suffix to significant tropical disturbances that form in or move into the basin, while the JTWC designates significant tropical cyclones with a number and a P suffix. The BoM, FMS and MetService all use the Australian Tropical Cyclone Intensity Scale and estimate wind speeds over a period of ten minutes, while the JTWC estimates sustained winds over a 1-minute period, which are subsequently compared to the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale (SSHWS).

Fiji Meteorological Service meteorological service of Fiji

The Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS) is a Department of the government of Fiji responsible for providing weather forecasts and is based in Nadi. The current director of Fiji Meteorological Service is Ravind Kumar. Since 1985, FMS has been responsible for naming and tracking tropical cyclones in the Southwest Pacific region. Current Meteorologists working at FMS have a Graduate Diploma in Meteorology from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology.

MetService meteorological service of New Zealand

Meteorological Service of New Zealand Limited (MetService) was established as a state-owned enterprise in 1992. It employs about 250 staff and its headquarters are in Wellington, New Zealand. Prior to becoming an SOE, New Zealand's national meteorological service has existed in a number of forms since the appointment of the country's first Director of Meteorological Stations in August 1861.

The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) is an Executive Agency of the Australian Government responsible for providing weather services to Australia and surrounding areas. It was established in 1906 under the Meteorology Act, and brought together the state meteorological services that existed before then. The states officially transferred their weather recording responsibilities to the Bureau of Meteorology on 1 January 1908.

Contents

Seasonal forecasts

Source/Record Tropical
Cyclone
Severe
Tropical Cyclone
Ref
Record high: 1997–98: 16 1982–83: 10 [1]
Record low: 2011–12:  3 2008–09:  0 [1] [2]
Average (1969-70 - 2016-17):7.1  [2]
NIWA October8-103-4 [3]
Fiji Meteorological Service4-61-3 [2]
RegionChance of
above average
Average
number
Actual
activity
Western South Pacific48%75
Eastern South Pacific55%40
Source:BOM's South Pacific Tropical Cyclone Season Outlook. [4]

Ahead of the cyclone season, the Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS), Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), New Zealand's MetService and National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) and various other Pacific Meteorological services, all contributed towards the Island Climate Update tropical cyclone outlook that was released during October 2016. [3] The outlook took into account the ENSO neutral conditions that had been observed across the Pacific and analogue seasons that had ENSO neutral and weak La Nina conditions occurring during the season. [3] The outlook called for a near average number of tropical cyclones for the 2017–18 season, with eight to ten named tropical cyclones, to occur between 135°E and 120°W compared to an average of about 10. [3] At least three of the tropical cyclones were expected to become Category 3 severe tropical cyclones, while two could become Category 4 severe tropical cyclones; they also noted that a Category 5 severe tropical cyclone was not likely to occur during the season. [3]

The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research or NIWA, is a Crown Research Institute of New Zealand. Established in 1992, NIWA conducts commercial and non-commercial research across a broad range of disciplines in the environmental sciences. It also maintains nationally and, in some cases, internationally important environmental monitoring networks, databases, and collections.

In addition to contributing towards the Island Climate Update outlook, the FMS and the BoM issued their own seasonal forecasts for the South Pacific region. [2] [4] The BoM issued two seasonal forecasts for the Southern Pacific Ocean, for their self-defined eastern and western regions of the South Pacific Ocean. [4] They predicted that the Western region between 142.5°E and 165°E, had a 48% chance of seeing activity above its average of 7 tropical cyclones. The BoM also predicted that the Eastern Region between 165°E and 120°W, had a 55% chance of seeing activity above its average of 4 tropical cyclones. [4] Within their outlook the FMS predicted that between four and six tropical cyclones, would occur within the basin compared to an average of around 7.1 cyclones. [2] At least one of the tropical cyclones was expected to intensify into a Category 3 or higher severe tropical cyclone. [2] They also predicted that the main area for tropical cyclogenesis would be within the Coral Sea, to the west of the International Dateline. [2]

Both the Island Climate Update and the FMS tropical cyclone outlooks assessed the risk of a tropical cyclone affecting a certain island or territory. [2] [3] The Island Climate Update Outlook predicted that New Caledonia, Tonga, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea had an above average chance of being impacted by a tropical cyclone or their remnants. [3] They also predicted that the Solomon Islands, Fiji and Vanuatu had a near normal to normal risk of being impacted by one or more tropical cyclones. [3] The Southern Cook Islands, American Samoa, Samoa, Niue, Tokelau, Tuvalu, as well as Wallis and Futuna were thought to have a below average chance of being impacted. It was also considered unlikely that the Northern Cook Islands, French Polynesia, Kiribati and the Pitcairn Islands would be affected by a tropical cyclone. [3] The FMS's outlook predicted that Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Fiji as well as Wallis and Futuna had a normal chance of being impacted by a tropical cyclone. [2] The outlook also predicted that the Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Samoa, Tonga, Niue, Cook Islands and French Polynesia had a reduced chance of being affected by a tropical cyclone. [2] It was thought that there was a normal risk of Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Fiji and Samoa being impacted by at least one severe tropical cyclone, while other areas such as the Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Samoa, Tonga, Niue and French Polynesia, had a reduced chance of being impacted by a severe tropical cyclone. [2]

Cook Islands Island country in the South Pacific Ocean

The Cook Islands is a self-governing island country in the South Pacific Ocean in free association with New Zealand. It comprises 15 islands whose total land area is 240 square kilometres (92.7 sq mi). The Cook Islands' Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) covers 1,800,000 square kilometres (690,000 sq mi) of ocean.

American Samoa US territory in the Pacific

American Samoa is an unincorporated territory of the United States located in the South Pacific Ocean, southeast of Samoa. Its location is centered around 14.2710° S, 170.1322° W. It is on the eastern border of the International Date Line, while independent Samoa is west of it.

Samoa country in Oceania

Samoa, officially the Independent State ofSamoa and, until 4 July 1997, known as Western Samoa, is a country consisting of two main islands, Savai'i and Upolu, and four smaller islands. The capital city is Apia. The Lapita people discovered and settled the Samoan Islands around 3,500 years ago. They developed a unique Samoan language and Samoan cultural identity.

Seasonal summary

Cyclone HolaCyclone GitaTropical cyclone scales#Comparisons across basins2017-18 South Pacific cyclone season

Systems

Tropical Depression 04F

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
04F 2017-12-22 0225Z.jpg   04F 2017 track.png
DurationDecember 20 – December 26
Peak intensityWinds not specified  998  hPa  (mbar)

Tropical Disturbance 05F

Tropical disturbance (Australian scale)
Temporary cyclone south.svg   05F 2018 track.png
DurationJanuary 26 – January 27
Peak intensityWinds not specified  996  hPa  (mbar)

Tropical Cyclone Fehi

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Fehi 2018-01-29 0330Z.jpg   Fehi 2018 track.png
DurationJanuary 28 (Entered basin) – January 30
Peak intensity85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min)  986  hPa  (mbar)

As a tropical cyclone, Fehi caused extensive damage in western New Zealand. Strong winds and heavy rain damaged hundreds of structures, with more than 100 later condemned. Waist-deep water flooded homes in Charleston and Westport. Pounding surf eroded beaches, exposing an old garbage dump at Cobden Beach which left thousands of garbage bags strewn about.[ citation needed ] Insurance loss were amounted at NZ$38.5 million (US$28.5 million). [5]

Charleston, New Zealand Place in West Coast, New Zealand

Charleston is a village in the South Island of New Zealand located 30 km south of Westport. It was founded as a goldmining town after a major goldrush in 1867, and is now an adventure tourist village noted for its extensive limestone caves and caving experiences. Guided tours of the nearby Metro Cave / Te Ananui Cave are operated out of Charleston and travel up the Nile River valley.

Westport, New Zealand Place in West Coast, New Zealand

Westport is a town in the West Coast region of the South Island of New Zealand. It is on the northern bank and at the mouth of the Buller River, close by the prominent headland of Cape Foulwind. It is connected via State Highway 6 with Greymouth, 100 kilometres (62 mi) to the south, and with Nelson 222 kilometres (138 mi) in the northeast, via the Buller Gorge.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Gita

Category 5 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 4 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Gita 2018-02-14 0150Z.jpg   Gita 2018 track.png
DurationFebruary 3 – February 19
Peak intensity205 km/h (125 mph) (10-min)  927  hPa  (mbar)

Tropical Depression 08F

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
08F 2018-02-08 2245Z.jpg   08F 2018 track.png
DurationFebruary 3 – February 11
Peak intensityWinds not specified  994  hPa  (mbar)

Severe Tropical Cyclone Hola

Category 4 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Hola 2018-03-08 0231Z.jpg   Hola 2018 track.png
DurationMarch 3 – March 11
Peak intensity165 km/h (105 mph) (10-min)  952  hPa  (mbar)

During March 3, 2018 the Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS) reported that Tropical Disturbance 09F had developed within a trough of low pressure about 230 km (145 mi) to the northeast of Nadi, Fiji. [6] [7] At this time the disturbance had a broad low-level circulation and was located within a very favourable environment for further development, with low vertical wind shear and warm sea surface temperatures. [8] Over the next couple of days, the disturbance gradually developed further as it gradually moved westwards towards Vanuatu, under the influence of a subtropical ridge of high pressure. [8] [9] It was subsequently classified as a tropical depression by the FMS during March 5, before the United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) subsequently issued a tropical cyclone formation alert on the system later that day. [10] [11]

Nadi Place in Viti Levu, Fiji

Nadi is the third-largest conurbation in Fiji. It is located on the western side of the main island of Viti Levu, and had a population of 42,284 at the most recent census, in 2007. A 2012 estimate showed that the population had grown to over 50,000. Nadi is multiracial with many of its inhabitants Indian or Fijian, along with a large transient population of foreign tourists. Along with sugar cane production, tourism is a mainstay of the local economy.

Vanuatu Country in Oceania

Vanuatu, officially the Republic of Vanuatu, is a Pacific island country located in the South Pacific Ocean. The archipelago, which is of volcanic origin, is 1,750 kilometres (1,090 mi) east of northern Australia, 540 kilometres (340 mi) northeast of New Caledonia, east of New Guinea, southeast of the Solomon Islands, and west of Fiji.

Joint Typhoon Warning Center

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) is a joint United States Navy – United States Air Force command located in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The JTWC is responsible for the issuing of tropical cyclone warnings in the North-West Pacific Ocean, South Pacific Ocean, and Indian Ocean for all branches of the U.S. Department of Defense and other U.S. government agencies. Their warnings are intended for the protection of primarily military ships and aircraft as well as military installations jointly operated with other countries around the world.

During March 6, the JTWC initiated advisories on the system and designated it as Tropical Cyclone 12P, after its broad low-level circulation center had slowly consolidated and the overall organisation of the cyclone had improved. [12] The FMS subsequently reported that the system had developed into a Category 1 tropical cyclone on the Australian tropical cyclone intensity scale and named it Hola, while it was located about 80 km (50 mi) to the east of Pentecost Island in Vanuatu. [13] After it was named, Hola started developing a weak low level eye feature, before it was classified as a category 2 tropical cyclone as it passed in between the islands of Pentecost and Ambrym. [14] [15] The system subsequently passed over the island of Malekula and moved into the Coral Sea during March 7, where it rapidly consolidated and developed a 10 km (5 mi) pinhole eye. [16] [17] The FMS subsequently reported that Gita had become a Category 4 Severe Tropical Cyclone and predicted that Hola would peak as a Category 5 Severe Tropical Cyclone. [18]


Tropical Depression 10F (Linda)

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
10F 2018-03-12 2335Z.jpg   Linda 2018 track.png
DurationMarch 11 – March 13 (Exited basin)
Peak intensity75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min)  998  hPa  (mbar)

On March 11, the FMS reported that Tropical Disturbance 10F, had developed about 85 km (55 mi) to the southwest of Rennell and Bellona Province of the Solomon Islands. [19] The system was poorly organised with deep atmospheric convection, displaced to the east of the system's consolidating low-level circulation center. The disturbance was subsequently classified as Tropical Low 21U by the BoM during March 12, as it moved southwards within an area of low vertical wind shear and warm sea surface temperatures. [20] [21] The JTWC initiated advisories on the system later that day and classified the storm as Tropical Cyclone 13P, after the system had rapidly consolidated, with bands of atmospheric convection wrapping into the low-level circulation center.[ citation needed ]

Tropical Cyclone Iris

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Iris 2018-03-24 0252Z.jpg   Iris 2018 track.png
DurationMarch 20 – March 24 (Exited basin)
Peak intensity75 km/h (45 mph) (10-min)  993  hPa  (mbar)

During March 20, the FMS reported that Tropical Disturbance 11F had developed within an area of low to moderate vertical wind shear, over the eastern Solomon Islands around 200 km (125 mi) to the east of Honiara. [22] At this time the system was poorly organised with deep atmospheric convection, located to the east of the low-level circulation centre. [22] Over the next few days, the system remained weak as it moved erratically around the Solomon Islands and was classified as a tropical depression during March 22. [23] [24]

On March 24, Tropical Depression 11F strengthened into Tropical Cyclone Iris. Later on the same day, Iris exited the basin and entered the Australian region basin.[ citation needed ]

Tropical Cyclone Josie

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Josie 2018-04-01 0142Z.jpg   Josie 2018 track.png
DurationMarch 29 – April 2
Peak intensity75 km/h (45 mph) (10-min)  993  hPa  (mbar)

Despite not making landfall, Tropical Cyclone Josie caused heavy rainfall and sustained gale-force winds in southern Fiji. [25] Severe flooding occurred in the city of Nadi, [26] and at least five people were washed away by floodwaters, of which four are confirmed dead and one is still missing. [25]

Severe Tropical Cyclone Keni

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 2 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Keni 2018-04-10 0124Z.jpg   Keni 2018 track.png
DurationApril 5 – April 11
Peak intensity140 km/h (85 mph) (10-min)  970  hPa  (mbar)

Tropical Cyclone Keni impacted Fiji and caused the cast and crew of the 37th season of the American reality competition series, Survivor , to be temporarily evacuated to the production's base camp. [27] [28]

Tropical Depression 14F

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
14F 2018-04-19 2345Z.jpg   14F 2018 track.png
DurationApril 17 – April 20
Peak intensityWinds not specified  1000  hPa  (mbar)

Other systems

Subtropical Cyclone "Lexi" near Chile on May 7 Lexi 2018-05-07 1900Z.jpg
Subtropical Cyclone "Lexi" near Chile on May 7

During December 16, Tropical Disturbance 02F developed within a trough of low pressure, about 25 km (15 mi) to the northeast of the island of Futuna. [29] [30] During the following day, Tropical Disturbance 03F developed along the same trough of low pressure about 45 km (30 mi) to the southeast of the island of Wallis. [30] [31] Over the next couple of days, the disturbances moved southeastwards into areas of high vertical wind shear, before they were last noted during December 18 and 19 as they dissipated to the southeast of Samoa. [32] [33]

On January 28, the JTWC issued a tropical cyclone formation alert on a tropical disturbance, which was located near the French Polynesian island of Rapa Iti. [34] The system had a well defined low-level circulation, and was located within an area of warm sea surface temperatures and marginal vertical wind shear. [34] The system subsequently peaked with 1-minute sustained wind speeds of 65 km/h (40 mph), which made it equivalent to a tropical storm. [35] The alert was subsequently cancelled during the next day, after the system's low level circulation center became ragged, while atmospheric convection was displaced to the east of the circulation center. [36]

On May 4, 2018, a system identified as a subtropical cyclone formed east of 120°W, just a few hundred miles off the coast of Chile, with researchers unofficially naming the storm Lexi. [37] The cyclone formed in an area without a Regional Specialized Meteorological Center, so it was not officially classified. [38] On May 9, the satellite services division of the NOAA classified the system as a weak subtropical storm, despite occurring in cooler (below 20°C) sea surface temperatures. [39]

Storm names

Within the Southern Pacific a tropical depression is judged to have reached tropical cyclone intensity should it reach winds of 65 km/h, (40 mph) and it is evident that gales are occurring at least halfway around the center. Tropical depressions intensifying into a tropical cyclone between the Equator and 25°S and between 160°E - 120°W named by the RSMC Nadi. However should a tropical depression intensify to the south of 25°S between 160°E and 120°W it would be named in conjunction with RSMC Nadi by TCWC Wellington. Should a tropical cyclone move out of the basin and into the Australian region it would retain its original name. The next 10 names on the naming list as of the start of the season are listed here below. [40] A total of six names were used during the season.

  • Keni
  • Liua (unused)
  • Mona (unused)
  • Neil (unused)
  • Oma (unused)

Season effects

This table lists all the storms that developed in the South Pacific to the east of longitude 160°E during the 2017–18 season. It includes their intensity on the Australian tropical cyclone intensity scale, duration, name, landfalls, deaths, and damages. All data is taken from RSMC Nadi and/or TCWC Wellington, and all of the damage figures are in 2017 USD.

NameDates active Peak classification Sustained
wind speeds
PressureAreas affectedDamage
(USD)
DeathsRefs
02FDecember 16 – 18Tropical disturbanceNot Specified1003 hPa (29.62 inHg)NoneNoneNone
03FDecember 17 – 19Tropical disturbanceNot Specified1000 hPa (29.53 inHg)NoneNoneNone
04FDecember 20 – 26Tropical depressionNot Specified998 hPa (29.47 inHg) Fiji NoneNone
05FJanuary 26 – 27Tropical disturbanceNot Specified996 hPa (29.41 inHg) New Caledonia NoneNone
FehiJanuary 28 – 30Category 1 tropical cyclone85 km/h (50 mph)986 hPa (29.12 inHg)New Caledonia, New Zealand $67 millionNone [41]
Gita February 3 – 19Category 5 severe tropical cyclone205 km/h (125 mph)927 hPa (27.37 inHg)Fiji, Wallis and Futuna, Samoan Islands, Niue,
Tonga, New Caledonia, New Zealand
$250 million2 [41]
08FFebruary 3 – 11Tropical depressionNot Specified994 hPa (29.35 inHg)FijiNoneNone
Hola March 3 – 11Category 4 severe tropical cyclone165 km/h (105 mph)952 hPa (28.11 inHg)Fiji, Vanuatu, New Caledonia, New ZealandUnknown3 [42] [43]
10FMarch 11 – 12Tropical depressionNot Specified998 hPa (29.47 inHg)NoneNoneNone
IrisMarch 20 – 24Category 1 tropical cyclone75 km/h (45 mph)993 hPa (29.32 inHg) Solomon Islands NoneNone
JosieMarch 29 – April 2Category 1 tropical cyclone75 km/h (45 mph)993 hPa (29.32 inHg)Vanuatu, Fiji, Tonga$10 million6 [41]
KeniApril 5 – 11Category 3 severe tropical cyclone140 km/h (85 mph)970 hPa (28.64 inHg)Vanuatu, Fiji, Tonga$50 millionNone [41]
14FApril 17 – 20Tropical depressionNot Specified1000 hPa (29.53 inHg) Rotuma UnknownUnknown
Season aggregates
13 systemsNovember 28 – April 20205 km/h (125 mph)927 hPa (27.37 inHg)$377 million11

See also

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The 2010–11 South Pacific cyclone season was an average tropical cyclone season, with seven tropical cyclones and five severe tropical cyclones developing during the season. The season ran from November 1, 2010 until April 30, 2011, though if any tropical cyclones had developed between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011, the official tropical cyclone year, they would have been counted towards the season's total. Within the South Pacific basin tropical cyclones were officially monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service's Regional Specialized Meteorological Center in Nadi, Fiji, north of 25°S, and to the south the Meteorological Service of New Zealand's Tropical Cyclone Warning Center in Wellington, New Zealand. Any disturbances forming in the region were designated with a sequential number suffixed by the letter F. In addition, the United States Military's Joint Typhoon Warning Center unofficially monitored parts of the basin during the season, where any systems judged to have achieved tropical storm strength or greater received a number suffixed with the letter P. RSMC Nadi and TCWC Wellington both use the Australian Tropical Cyclone Intensity Scale, and measure wind speeds over a period of ten minutes, while the JTWC measures sustained winds over a period of one minute which can be applied to the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale. Seven named storms formed or moved into the South Pacific basin during the 2010–11 season, the strongest of which was Severe Tropical Cyclone Wilma in late January.

2011–12 South Pacific cyclone season cyclone season in the South Pacific ocean

The 2011–12 South Pacific cyclone season was one of the least active South Pacific tropical cyclone seasons on record, with only three tropical cyclones occurring during the season. The season ran from November 1, 2011 to April 30, 2012, however, any tropical cyclones that form before June 30, 2012 would have fallen within the 2011–12 tropical cyclone year and would have counted towards the season total. The strongest and only severe tropical cyclone that occurred during the season was Severe Tropical Cyclone Jasmine, which tracked in from out of the South Pacific basin. Within the basin, tropical cyclones are monitored by the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) in Nadi, Fiji, and the Tropical Cyclone Warning Center (TCWC) in Wellington, New Zealand. RSMC Nadi attaches an F designation to tropical disturbances that form in or move into the South Pacific. The United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) issues unofficial warnings within the South Pacific, designating tropical storm-equivalent or greater tropical cyclones with a number and a P suffix. RSMC Nadi and TCWC Wellington both use the Australian Tropical Cyclone Intensity Scale, and measure windspeeds over a period of ten minutes, while the JTWC measures sustained winds over a period of one minute and uses the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale.

2012–13 South Pacific cyclone season cyclone season in the South Pacific ocean

The 2012–13 South Pacific cyclone season was a somewhat below average tropical cyclone season, with six tropical cyclones occurring within the basin between 160°E and 120°W. The season officially ran from November 1, 2012 to April 30, 2013, however the last tropical disturbance was last noted on May 1, as it moved into the subtropics. During the season, tropical cyclones were officially monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS), Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) and New Zealand's MetService. The United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and other national meteorological services including Météo-France and NOAA also monitored the basin during the season. During the season there were 22 significant tropical disturbances assigned a number and a F suffix by the FMS's Regional Specialized Meteorological Center in Nadi, Fiji (RSMC Nadi), including Severe Tropical Cyclone Sandra which moved into the basin from the Australian region on March 9. The BoM, MetService and RSMC Nadi all estimated sustained wind speeds over a period of 10-minutes and used the Australian tropical cyclone intensity scale, while the JTWC estimated sustained winds over a 1-minute period, which are subsequently compared to the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale (SSHS).

2013–14 South Pacific cyclone season

The 2013–14 South Pacific cyclone season was a slightly below average tropical cyclone season, with six tropical cyclones occurring within the basin between 160°E and 120°W. The season ran from November 1, 2013 to April 30, 2014, however, the first four tropical disturbances occurred during October 2013 and were included as a part of the season. During the season, tropical cyclones were officially monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS), Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) and New Zealand's MetService. The United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and other national meteorological services including Météo-France and NOAA also monitored the basin during the season. During the season there were 21 significant tropical disturbances were assigned a number and an "F" suffix by the FMS's Regional Specialized Meteorological Center in Nadi, Fiji (RSMC Nadi), including the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Hadi from the Australian region. The BoM, MetService and RSMC Nadi all estimated sustained wind speeds over a period of 10-minutes and used the Australian tropical cyclone intensity scale, while the JTWC estimated sustained winds over a 1-minute period, which are subsequently compared to the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale (SSHS).

2014–15 South Pacific cyclone season

The 2014–15 South Pacific cyclone season was a slightly-below average tropical cyclone season, with five tropical cyclones occurring within the basin between 160°E and 120°W. The season officially ran from November 1, 2014 to April 30, 2015. During the season, tropical cyclones were officially monitored by the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) in Nadi, Fiji and the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centers in Brisbane, Australia and Wellington, New Zealand. The United States Armed Forces through the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) also monitored the basin and issued unofficial warnings for American interests. RSMC Nadi attaches a number and an F suffix to tropical disturbances that form in or move into the basin while the JTWC designates significant tropical cyclones with a number and a P suffix. RSMC Nadi, TCWC Wellington and TCWC Brisbane all use the Australian Tropical Cyclone Intensity Scale and estimate windspeeds over a period of ten minutes, while the JTWC estimated sustained winds over a 1-minute period, which are subsequently compared to the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale (SSHWS).

2015–16 South Pacific cyclone season

The 2015–16 South Pacific cyclone season was one of the most disastrous South Pacific tropical cyclone seasons on record, with a total of 50 deaths and $1.405 billion in damage. Throughout the season, 8 systems attained tropical cyclone status, whilst 5 became severe tropical cyclones. The most notable cyclone of the season by far was Winston, which attained a minimum pressure of 884 hPa, and maximum ten-minute sustained winds of 175 mph (280 km/h), making it the most intense tropical cyclone on record in the Southern Hemisphere. Winston went on to devastate Fiji, causing $1.4 billion in damage and 44 deaths across the country.

2016–17 South Pacific cyclone season

The 2016–17 South Pacific cyclone season was the least active South Pacific cyclone season since the 2011–12 season, with only four tropical cyclones occurring within the South Pacific Ocean to the east of 160°E. Two of the four systems developed into severe tropical cyclones on the Australian tropical cyclone intensity scale. The season officially ran from November 1, 2016 until April 30, 2017. However, May featured two post-season systems: Donna and Ella, of which the former was the strongest post-season South Pacific tropical cyclone ever recorded in that month. Overall, 22 tropical disturbances were monitored by a combination of the Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS), Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) and New Zealand's MetService.

2018–19 South Pacific cyclone season

The 2018–19 South Pacific cyclone season is the period of the year when most tropical cyclones form within the South Pacific Ocean to the east of 160°E. The season officially runs from November 1, 2018 to April 30, 2019; however, a tropical cyclone could form at any time between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019 and would count towards the season total. During the season, tropical cyclones will be officially monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service, Australian Bureau of Meteorology, and New Zealand's MetService. The United States Armed Forces through the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) also monitored the basin and issued warnings for American interests. RSMC Nadi attaches a number and an F suffix to tropical disturbances that form in or move into the basin, while the JTWC designates significant tropical cyclones with a number and a P suffix. The FMS, the BoM and MetService all use the Australian Tropical Cyclone Intensity Scale and estimate wind speeds over a period of ten minutes, while the JTWC estimates sustained winds over a 1-minute period, which are subsequently compared to the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale (SSHWS).

Cyclone Cook tropical cyclone

Severe Tropical Cyclone Cook was the second named tropical cyclone of the 2016-17 South Pacific cyclone season.

Cyclone Donna Category 5 South Pacific cyclone in 2017

Severe Tropical Cyclone Donna was the strongest off-season tropical cyclone in the Southern Hemisphere during the month of May. The twenty-first tropical disturbance, third named storm, and second severe tropical cyclone of the annual cyclone season, Donna formed from an area of disturbed weather that was first monitored west-northwest of Fiji on 1 May 2017. The disturbance drifted eastward amid an increasingly favourable environment, and it was designated Tropical Depression 21F late on 2 May. Twelve hours later, it intensified into a Category 1 on the Australian tropical cyclone scale and was designated Tropical Cyclone Donna as the storm's motion shifted west and then south. After reaching its initial peak as a Category 4 cyclone early on 6 May, the effects of wind shear and upwelling caused the storm to weaken. However, it reintensified into a Category 5 cyclone on 8 May. Soon after, Donna entered a region of strong westerly flow and began to rapidly weaken. Continuing to accelerate in a southerly direction, Donna eventually weakened into a tropical low on 10 May. By 16 May, Donna's remnants had fully dissipated.

Cyclone Hola

Severe Tropical Cyclone Hola was a strong tropical cyclone which affected Vanuatu, New Caledonia and New Zealand. Forming as a broad tropical disturbance on 5 March, the system slowly consolidated over the next few days before developing into a tropical cyclone on 6 March. Afterwards, a pinhole eye began to emerge and rapid intensification ensued.

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