2019 Vuelta a España

Last updated
2019 Vuelta a España
2019 UCI World Tour, race 32 of 38
Race details
Dates24 August – 15 September
Stages21
Distance3,290.7 km (2,045 mi)
Winning time83h 07' 14"
Results
Jersey red.svg WinnerFlag of Slovenia.svg  Primož Roglič  (SLO)(Team Jumbo–Visma)
  SecondFlag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP)(Movistar Team)
  ThirdFlag of Slovenia.svg  Tadej Pogačar  (SLO)(UAE Team Emirates)

Jersey green.svg PointsFlag of Slovenia.svg  Primož Roglič  (SLO)(Team Jumbo–Visma)
Jersey blue polkadot.svg MountainsFlag of France.svg  Geoffrey Bouchard  (FRA)(AG2R La Mondiale)
Jersey white.svg YouthFlag of Slovenia.svg  Tadej Pogačar  (SLO)(UAE Team Emirates)
Jersey yellow number.svg CombativityFlag of Colombia.svg  Miguel Ángel López  (COL)(Astana)
Jersey red number.svg Team Movistar Team
  2018
2020  

The 2019 Vuelta a España was a three-week Grand Tour cycling stage race that took place in Spain, Andorra and France between 24 August and 15 September 2019. [1] The race was the 74th edition of the Vuelta a España and is the final Grand Tour of the 2019 cycling season. The race started with a team time trial in Torrevieja on the Costa Blanca. [2] [3]

In road bicycle racing, a Grand Tour is one of the three major European professional cycling stage races: Giro d'Italia, Tour de France and Vuelta a España. Collectively they are termed the Grand Tours, and all three races are similar in format being three week races with daily stages. They have a special status in the UCI regulations: more points for the UCI World Tour are distributed in Grand Tours than in other races, and they are the only stage races allowed to last longer than 14 days.

Andorra European microstate between France and Spain

Andorra, officially the Principality of Andorra, also called the Principality of the Valleys of Andorra, is a sovereign landlocked microstate on the Iberian Peninsula, in the eastern Pyrenees, bordered by France to the north and Spain to the south. Believed to have been created by Charlemagne, Andorra was ruled by the Count of Urgell until 988, when it was transferred to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Urgell, and the present principality was formed by a charter in 1278. It is known as a principality as it is a diarchy headed by two Princes: the Catholic Bishop of Urgell in Catalonia, Spain, and the President of France.

The Vuelta a España is an annual multi-stage bicycle race primarily held in Spain, while also occasionally making passes through nearby countries. Inspired by the success of the Giro d'Italia and the Tour de France, the race was first organized in 1935. The race was prevented from being run by the Spanish Civil War and World War II in the early years of its existence; however, the race has been held annually since 1955. As the Vuelta gained prestige and popularity the race was lengthened and its reach began to extend all around the globe. Since 1979, the event has been staged and managed by Unipublic, until in 2014, when Amaury Sport Organisation acquired control, with both working together. The peloton expanded from a primarily Spanish participation to include riders from all over the world. The Vuelta is a UCI World Tour event, which means that the teams that compete in the race are mostly UCI WorldTeams, with the exception of the wild card teams that the organizers can invite.

Contents

The race was won by Primož Roglič of Team Jumbo–Visma, making him the first Slovenian rider to win a Grand Tour. Rounding out the podium were Alejandro Valverde of Movistar Team in second and Roglič's countryman Tadej Pogačar of UAE Team Emirates in third.

Primož Roglič Slovenian ski jumper and bicycle racer

Primož Roglič is a Slovenian racing cyclist, who currently rides for UCI WorldTeam Team Jumbo–Visma. Roglič started his career as a ski jumper but then shifted to cycling.

Team Jumbo–Visma cycling team

Team Jumbo–Visma is a men's professional bicycle racing team, successor of the former Rabobank. The team consists of three sections: ProTeam, Continental, and Cyclo-cross.

Alejandro Valverde Spanish cyclist

Alejandro Valverde Belmonte is a Spanish road racing cyclist, who currently rides for UCI WorldTeam Movistar Team. Valverde's biggest wins have been the Vuelta a España in 2009, Critérium du Dauphiné in 2008 and 2009, Tour of the Basque Country in 2017, Volta a Catalunya in 2009, 2017 and 2018, Liège–Bastogne–Liège in 2006, 2008, 2015 and 2017, La Flèche Wallonne in 2006, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017, the Clásica de San Sebastián in 2008 and 2014, the 2006 and 2008 UCI ProTours, the 2014 and 2015 UCI World Tours, and the road race in the 2018 World Championships.

Along with the overall, Roglič also took the points classification. Geoffrey Bouchard of AG2R La Mondiale won the mountains classification, while Pogačar was the best young rider. Miguel Ángel López of Astana was named the overall most combative, and Movistar Team won the team classification.

Geoffrey Bouchard French cyclist

Geoffrey Bouchard is a French cyclist who currently rides for UCI WorldTeam AG2R La Mondiale. In August 2019, he was named in the startlist for the 2019 Vuelta a España. He took over the lead in the King of the Mountains competition following stage 16 and would hold this lead for the remainder of the race.

AG2R La Mondiale (cycling team) Cycling team

AG2R La Mondiale is a French cycling team with UCI WorldTeam status. Its title sponsor is AG2R La Mondiale, one of the biggest French insurance firms. The team is predominantly French.

Miguel Ángel López (cyclist) Colombian cyclist

Miguel Ángel López Moreno is a Colombian cyclist, who currently rides for UCI WorldTeam Astana.

Teams

The 18 UCI WorldTeams are automatically invited to the race. In addition, four Professional Continental teams obtained a wildcard, bringing the number of teams to 22. [4]

The 2019 UCI World Tour is a series of races that is scheduled to include thirty-eight road cycling events throughout the 2019 men's cycling season. It is the first time since the World Tour was launched by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) in 2009 that it is not a ranking competition in its own right. The tour started with the opening stage of the Tour Down Under on 15 January and is scheduled to conclude with the final stage of the Tour of Guangxi on 20 October.

The teams that entered the race were:

UCI WorldTeams

Astana Pro Team Kazakhstani cycling team

Astana Pro Team is a professional road bicycle racing team sponsored by the Samruk-Kazyna, a coalition of state-owned companies from Kazakhstan and named after its capital city Astana. Astana attained UCI ProTeam status in its inaugural year, 2007. Following a major doping scandal involving Kazakhstani rider Alexander Vinokourov, team management was terminated and new management brought in for the 2008 season. The team was then managed by Johan Bruyneel, former team manager of U.S. Postal/Discovery Channel team. Under Bruyneel the ethical nature of the team did not improve, although Astana in this period was very successful. With a lineup including Grand Tour winner Alberto Contador, as well as runner-up Andreas Klöden the results were there, however the team was on the verge of financial collapse in May 2009. A battle for control of the team led to the return of Vinokourov for the 2009 Vuelta a España caused Bruyneel and at least fourteen of its riders to leave at the end of the 2009 season, most for Team RadioShack. Only four Spanish riders, including Contador, and most of the Kazakhs remained with the rebuilt team for 2010. Those four Spaniards all left the team for Saxo Bank–SunGard in 2011.

Bahrain–Merida Pro Cycling Team is a UCI WorldTeam cycling team from Bahrain which was founded in 2017. Its title sponsors are the government of Bahrain and the Taiwanese bicycle manufacturer Merida.

Bora–Hansgrohe cycling team

Bora–Hansgrohe is a UCI WorldTeam cycling team established in 2010 with a German license, founded and managed by Ralph Denk. It is sponsored by BORA, German manufacturer, and Hansgrohe, bathroom fittings manufacturer. Its aim is "improving the image of road cycling in Germany".

UCI Professional Continental teams

Burgos BH cycling team (2006-)

Burgos BH is a UCI Professional Continental cycling team based in Spain. The team was founded in 2006 under the name of "Viña Magna-Cropu".

Caja Rural–Seguros RGA is a professional continental cycling team sponsored principally by Grupo Caja Rural, a Spanish banking group. The team participates in UCI Europe Tour races and UCI World Tour events when given a wildcard invitation. The team's administrative offices and management are based in Pamplona, Navarra, Spain, but its service course is in Alsasua, Navarra. It was announced in February 2013 that the team had acquired a co-sponsor in a subsidiary of Caja Rural and would become known as Caja Rural–Seguros RGA from 21 February 2013.

Cofidis (cycling team) sports team

Cofidis Solutions Crédits is a French professional road bicycle racing team sponsored by a money-lending company, Cofidis. It was started in 1996 by Cyrille Guimard the former manager of Bernard Hinault, Greg LeMond and Laurent Fignon of the Renault-Elf-Gitane team of the 1980s. The team's sponsor has supported the team despite repeated problems such as doping scandals. After it was part of the UCI ProTour for the ProTour's first five seasons, from 2010 on the team competes as a UCI Professional Continental team.

Pre-race favourites

The winner of the 2018 Vuelta a España, Simon Yates, had decided to not defend his title after riding in the 2019 Giro d'Italia and Tour de France. Steven Kruijswijk, Primož Roglič (Team Jumbo-Visma), Miguel Ángel López, Jakob Fuglsang (Astana) and Nairo Quintana (Movistar Team) were considered among the pre-race favourites. Fernando Gaviria (UAE Team Emirates) and Sam Bennett (Bora-Hansgrohe) were considered as potential stage winners and points classification contenders. [5] [6] Kruijswijk climbed on the podium of the 2019 Tour de France, while his team partner Roglič got third at the 2019 Giro d'Italia. López was on the podium on both the 2018 Giro d'Italia and the 2018 Vuelta a España.

There were three previous winners among the participating cyclists: Alejandro Valverde (2009), Fabio Aru (2015) and Nairo Quintana (2016). Valverde (Movistar Team) and Thomas De Gendt (Lotto-Soudal) also attempted to defend their points and mountain classification titles.[ citation needed ]

Stages

List of stages [7] [8]
StageDateCourseDistanceType [9] Winner
1 24 August Salinas de Torrevieja to Torrevieja 13.4 km (8.3 mi)Team Time Trial Stage.svgTeam time trial Astana
2 25 August Benidorm to Calpe 199.6 km (124.0 mi)Hillystage.svgHilly stageFlag of Colombia.svg  Nairo Quintana  (COL)
3 26 August Ibi to Alicante 188 km (116.8 mi)Plainstage.svgFlat stageFlag of Ireland.svg  Sam Bennett  (IRL)
4 27 August Cullera to El Puig 175.5 km (109.1 mi)Plainstage.svgFlat stageFlag of the Netherlands.svg  Fabio Jakobsen  (NED)
5 28 August L'Eliana to Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre 170.7 km (106.1 mi)Hillystage.svgHilly stageFlag of Spain.svg  Ángel Madrazo  (ESP)
6 29 August Mora de Rubielos to Ares del Maestrat 198.9 km (123.6 mi)Hillystage.svgHilly stageFlag of Spain.svg  Jesús Herrada  (ESP)
7 30 August Onda to Mas de la Costa 183.2 km (113.8 mi)Mountainstage.svgMountain stageFlag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP)
8 31 August Valls to Igualada 166.9 km (103.7 mi)Hillystage.svgHilly stageFlag of Germany.svg  Nikias Arndt  (GER)
9 1 September Andorra la Vella (Andorra) to Cortals d'Encamp (Andorra)94.4 km (58.7 mi)Mountainstage.svgMountain stageFlag of Slovenia.svg  Tadej Pogačar  (SLO)
2 September Andorra Rest day
10 3 September Jurançon (France) to Pau (France)36.2 km (22.5 mi)Time Trial.svgIndividual time trialFlag of Slovenia.svg  Primož Roglič  (SLO)
11 4 September Saint-Palais (France) to Urdax 180 km (111.8 mi)Hillystage.svgHilly stageFlag of Spain.svg  Mikel Iturria  (ESP)
12 5 September Circuito de Navarra to Bilbao 171.4 km (106.5 mi)Hillystage.svgHilly stageFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Philippe Gilbert  (BEL)
13 6 September Bilbao to Los Machucos 166.4 km (103.4 mi)Mountainstage.svgMountain stageFlag of Slovenia.svg  Tadej Pogačar  (SLO)
14 7 September San Vicente de la Barquera to Oviedo 188 km (116.8 mi)Plainstage.svgFlat stageFlag of Ireland.svg  Sam Bennett  (IRL)
15 8 September Tineo to Santuario del Acebo 154.4 km (95.9 mi)Mountainstage.svgMountain stageFlag of the United States.svg  Sepp Kuss  (USA)
16 9 September Pravia to La Cubilla  [ es ]144.4 km (89.7 mi)Mountainstage.svgMountain stageFlag of Denmark.svg  Jakob Fuglsang  (DEN)
10 September León Rest day
17 11 September Aranda de Duero to Guadalajara 219.6 km (136.5 mi)Plainstage.svgFlat stageFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Philippe Gilbert  (BEL)
18 12 September Colmenar Viejo to Becerril de la Sierra 177.5 km (110.3 mi)Mountainstage.svgMountain stageFlag of Colombia.svg  Sergio Higuita  (COL)
19 13 September Ávila to Toledo 165.2 km (102.7 mi)Plainstage.svgFlat stageFlag of France.svg  Rémi Cavagna  (FRA)
20 14 September Arenas de San Pedro to Plataforma de Gredos  [ es ]190.4 km (118.3 mi)Mountainstage.svgMountain stageFlag of Slovenia.svg  Tadej Pogačar  (SLO)
21 15 September Fuenlabrada to Madrid 106.6 km (66.2 mi)Plainstage.svgFlat stageFlag of the Netherlands.svg  Fabio Jakobsen  (NED)
Total3,290.7 km (2,044.7 mi)

Classification leadership

The Vuelta a España has four individual classifications, for which jerseys were awarded daily to the leading rider, as well as a team competition. The primary classification is the general classification, which is calculated by adding each rider's finishing times on each stage. Time bonuses were awarded at the end of every stage apart from the team time trial (stage 1) and individual time trial (stage 10). The rider with the lowest cumulative time is the leader of the general classification, and wears the red jersey. The leader of the general classification at the end of the race is considered the overall winner of the Vuelta a España. [10]

The second classification is the points classification. Riders receive points for finishing among the highest placed in a stage finish, or in intermediate sprints during the stages. The points available for each stage finish are determined by the stage's type. The leader is identified by a green jersey. [10]

Mountains classification points
Category1st2nd3rd4th5th6th
Cima Alberto Fernández 201510642
Special-category1510642
First-category106421
Second-category531
Third-category321

The next classification is the mountains classification. Points are awarded to the riders that reach the summit of the most difficult climbs first. The climbs are categorized, in order of increasing difficulty, third-, second-, and first- and special-category. The leader wears white jersey with blue polka dots. [10]

The final of the individual classifications is the young rider classification, which is calculated by adding each rider's finishing times on each stage for each rider born on or after 1 January 1994. The rider with the lowest cumulative time is the leader of the young rider classification, and wears the white jersey. [10]

There is also the team classification. After each stage, the times of the three highest finishers of each team are added together. The victory is awarded to the team with the lowest cumulative time at the end of the event. [10]

In addition, there is one individual award: the combativity award. This award is given after each stage (excluding the team time trial and individual time trial) to the rider "who displayed the most generous effort and best sporting spirit." The daily winner wears a green number bib the following stage. At the end of the Vuelta, a jury decides the top three riders for the “Most Combative Rider of La Vuelta”, with a public vote deciding the victor. [10]

Classification leadership by stage [11]
StageWinner General classification

Jersey red.svg
Points classification

Jersey green.svg
Mountains classification
Jersey blue polkadot.svg
Young rider classification
Jersey white.svg
Team classification

Jersey red number.svg
Combativity award

Jersey yellow number.svg
1 Astana Miguel Ángel López not awardednot awarded Miguel Ángel López Astana Miguel Ángel López
2 Nairo Quintana Nicolas Roche Nairo Quintana Ángel Madrazo Team Sunweb Ángel Madrazo
3 Sam Bennett Ángel Madrazo
4 Fabio Jakobsen Sam Bennett Jorge Cubero
5 Ángel Madrazo Miguel Ángel López Movistar Team José Herrada
6 Jesús Herrada Dylan Teuns Jesús Herrada
7 Alejandro Valverde Miguel Ángel López Nairo Quintana Sergio Henao
8 Nikias Arndt Nicolas Edet David de la Cruz
9 Tadej Pogačar Nairo Quintana Geoffrey Bouchard
10 Primož Roglič Primož Roglič Primož Roglič Primož Roglič
11 Mikel Iturria Alex Aranburu
12 Philippe Gilbert Philippe Gilbert
13 Tadej Pogačar Tadej Pogačar Héctor Sáez
14 Sam Bennett Diego Rubio
15 Sepp Kuss Sergio Samitier
16 Jakob Fuglsang Geoffrey Bouchard Ángel Madrazo
17 Philippe Gilbert Nairo Quintana
18 Sergio Higuita Miguel Ángel López Sergio Higuita
19 Rémi Cavagna Rémi Cavagna
20 Tadej Pogačar Tadej Pogačar Tao Geoghegan Hart
21 Fabio Jakobsen not awarded
Final Primož Roglič Primož Roglič Geoffrey Bouchard Tadej Pogačar Movistar Team Miguel Ángel López

Standings

Legend
Jersey red.svg Denotes the winner of the general classification
Jersey green.svg Denotes the winner of the points classification
Jersey blue polkadot.svg Denotes the winner of the mountains classification
Jersey white.svg Denotes the winner of the young rider classification
Jersey red number.svg Denotes the winner of the team classification
Jersey yellow number.svg Denotes the winner of the combativity award

General classification

Podium in Madrid on 15 September 2019 (Podio) Almeida entrega el primer premio de La Vuelta Ciclista a Espana 2019 03.jpg
Podium in Madrid on 15 September 2019
Final general classification (1–10) [11]
RankRiderTeamTime
1Flag of Slovenia.svg  Primož Roglič  (SLO) Jersey red.svg Jersey green.svg Team Jumbo–Visma 83h 07' 14"
2Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Jersey red number.svg Movistar Team + 2' 33"
3Flag of Slovenia.svg  Tadej Pogačar  (SLO) Jersey white.svg UAE Team Emirates + 2' 55"
4Flag of Colombia.svg  Nairo Quintana  (COL) Jersey red number.svg Movistar Team + 3' 46"
5Flag of Colombia.svg  Miguel Ángel López  (COL) Jersey yellow number.svg Astana + 4' 48"
6Flag of Poland.svg  Rafał Majka  (POL) Bora–Hansgrohe + 7' 33"
7Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Wilco Kelderman  (NED) Team Sunweb + 10' 04"
8Flag of Norway.svg  Carl Fredrik Hagen  (NOR) Lotto–Soudal + 12' 54"
9Flag of Spain.svg  Marc Soler  (ESP) Jersey red number.svg Movistar Team + 22' 27"
10Flag of Spain.svg  Mikel Nieve  (ESP) Mitchelton–Scott + 22' 34"

Points classification

Final points classification (1–10) [11]
RankRiderTeamPoints
1Flag of Slovenia.svg  Primož Roglič  (SLO) Jersey green.svg Jersey red.svg Team Jumbo–Visma 155
2Flag of Slovenia.svg  Tadej Pogačar  (SLO) Jersey white.svg UAE Team Emirates 136
3Flag of Ireland.svg  Sam Bennett  (IRL) Bora–Hansgrohe 134
4Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Jersey red number.svg Movistar Team 132
5Flag of Colombia.svg  Nairo Quintana  (COL) Jersey red number.svg Movistar Team 100
6Flag of Colombia.svg  Miguel Ángel López  (COL) Jersey yellow number.svg Astana 76
7Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Philippe Gilbert  (BEL) Deceuninck–Quick-Step 73
8Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Dylan Teuns  (BEL) Bahrain–Merida 69
9Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Tosh Van der Sande  (BEL) Lotto–Soudal 63
10Flag of Colombia.svg  Sergio Higuita  (COL) EF Education First 62

Mountains classification

Final mountains classification (1–10) [11]
RankRiderTeamPoints
1Flag of France.svg  Geoffrey Bouchard  (FRA) Jersey blue polkadot.svg AG2R La Mondiale 76
2Flag of Spain.svg  Ángel Madrazo  (ESP) Burgos BH 44
3Flag of Spain.svg  Sergio Samitier  (ESP) Euskadi–Murias 42
4Flag of Slovenia.svg  Tadej Pogačar  (SLO) Jersey white.svg UAE Team Emirates 38
5Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tao Geoghegan Hart  (GBR) Team Ineos 35
6Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Wout Poels  (NED) Team Ineos 31
7Flag of Spain.svg  Alejandro Valverde  (ESP) Jersey red number.svg Movistar Team 29
8Flag of Colombia.svg  Sergio Henao  (COL) UAE Team Emirates 27
9Flag of Denmark.svg  Jakob Fuglsang  (DEN) Astana 24
10Flag of Spain.svg  Mikel Bizkarra  (ESP) Euskadi–Murias 22

Young rider classification

Final young rider classification (1–10) [11]
RankRiderTeamTime
1Flag of Slovenia.svg  Tadej Pogačar  (SLO) Jersey white.svg UAE Team Emirates 83h 10' 09"
2Flag of Colombia.svg  Miguel Ángel López  (COL) Jersey yellow number.svg Astana + 1' 53"
3Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  James Knox  (GBR) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 20' 00"
4Flag of Colombia.svg  Sergio Higuita  (COL) EF Education First + 29' 22"
5Flag of Portugal.svg  Ruben Guerreiro  (POR) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 39' 10"
6Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tao Geoghegan Hart  (GBR) Team Ineos + 1h 01' 26"
7Flag of Switzerland.svg  Kilian Frankiny  (SUI) Groupama–FDJ + 1h 08' 47"
8Flag of Spain.svg  Óscar Rodríguez  (ESP) Euskadi–Murias + 1h 10' 19"
9Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Ben O'Connor  (AUS) Team Dimension Data + 1h 22' 58"
10Flag of the United States.svg  Sepp Kuss  (USA) Team Jumbo–Visma + 1h 32' 38"

Team classification

Final team classification (1–10) [11]
RankTeamTime
1 Movistar Team Jersey red number.svg 248h 26' 24"
2 Astana + 51' 38"
3 Team Jumbo–Visma + 2h 03' 42"
4 Mitchelton–Scott + 2h 26' 47"
5 AG2R La Mondiale + 3h 14' 09"
6 Team Sunweb + 3h 20' 01"
7 Euskadi–Murias + 3h 38' 55"
8 Bahrain–Merida + 3h 45' 14"
9 Team Dimension Data + 3h 55' 52"
10 Team Ineos + 4h 00' 34"

Related Research Articles

Movistar Team is a professional road bicycle racing team which participates at UCI WorldTeam level and has achieved thirteen general classification (GC) victories in Grand Tours. The title sponsor is the Spanish mobile telephone company Telefónica, with the team riding under the name of the company's brand Movistar.

2009 Vuelta a España cycling race

The 2009 Vuelta a España was the 64th Vuelta a España. The event took place from 29 August to 20 September 2009. For only the second time in the race's history, it began away from Spanish soil, with the race not in fact reaching Spain until Stage 5.

Combination classification in the Vuelta a España

The combination classification was one of the primary awards in the Vuelta a España cycling stage race. This classification was calculated by adding the numeral ranks of each cyclist in the general, points, and mountains classifications, with the lowest cumulative total signifying the leader of this competition.

2013 Tour de France cycling race

The 2013 Tour de France was the 100th edition of the Tour de France, one of cycling's Grand Tours. It started on the island of Corsica on 30 June and finished on the Champs-Élysées in Paris on 21 July. The Tour consisted of twenty-one stages and covered a total distance of 3,403.5 km (2,115 mi). The overall general classification was won by Chris Froome of Team Sky. Second and third respectively were Nairo Quintana and the Team Katusha rider Joaquim Rodríguez.

2012 Vuelta a España cycling race

The 2012 Vuelta a España started on 18 August 2012 and was the 67th edition of the race. The race began in Pamplona with a team time trial and ended on 9 September, as traditional, in Madrid. The 2012 edition saw the return of the Bola del Mundo mountain top finish. It was the venue of an exciting battle between winner Vincenzo Nibali and runner-up Ezequiel Mosquera in the 2010 edition. It was the first time since 1994 that the race visited the region of Navarre. The previous time that Pamplona was visited by a Grand Tour in 1996, when the city hosted the finish of a memorable stage of the 1996 Tour de France. On that occasion, the race paid homage to Miguel Indurain by passing through his home village of Villava en route.

Nairo Quintana Colombian road bicyclist

Nairo Alexander Quintana Rojas, ODB, is a Colombian racing cyclist, who currently rides for UCI WorldTeam Movistar Team.

The 2014 Vuelta a España took place between 23 August and 14 September 2014 and was the 69th edition of the race. It featured eight mountain stages, five hill stages, five flat stages, and three time trials, two of which appeared at the beginning and end of the race. Jerez de la Frontera, on the Spanish south coast, hosted the opening stage. The Vuelta then went counterclockwise, through the south-east and east of the country before crossing the north and finishing in Santiago de Compostela. This was the first time in 21 years that the race has finished outside Madrid.

2015 Vuelta a España cycling race

The 2015 Vuelta a España was a three-week Grand Tour cycling race. The race was the 70th edition of the Vuelta a España and took place principally in Spain, although two stages took place partly or wholly in Andorra, and was the 22nd race in the 2015 UCI World Tour. The 3,358.1-kilometre (2,086.6 mi) race included 21 stages, beginning in Marbella on 22 August 2015 and finishing in Madrid on 13 September. It was won by Fabio Aru, with Joaquim Rodríguez second and Rafał Majka (Tinkoff–Saxo) third.

The 2016 Tour of the Basque Country was a road cycling stage race that took place in the Basque Country between 4 and 9 April 2016. It was the 56th edition of the Tour of the Basque Country and the ninth event of the 2016 UCI World Tour.

The 2016 Vuelta a España was a three-week Grand Tour cycling stage race that took place in Spain between 20 August and 11 September 2016. The race was the 71st edition of the Vuelta a España and the final Grand Tour of the 2016 cycling season.

2017 Tour de France cycling race

The 2017 Tour de France was the 104th edition of the Tour de France, one of cycling's Grand Tours. The 21-stage race took place across 3,540 km (2,200 mi), commencing with an individual time trial in Düsseldorf, Germany on 1 July, and concluding with the Champs-Élysées stage in Paris on 23 July. A total of 198 riders from 22 teams entered the race. The overall general classification won by Chris Froome of Team Sky, his fourth overall victory. Rigoberto Urán (Cannondale–Drapac) and Romain Bardet finished second and third, respectively.

2017 Vuelta a España cycling race

The 2017 Vuelta a España was a three-week Grand Tour cycling stage race that took place in Spain between 19 August and 10 September 2017. The race was the 72nd edition of the Vuelta a España and the final Grand Tour of the 2017 cycling season. The race started in Nîmes, France, and finished in Madrid. It was the first time the race has started in France and only the third time it has started outside Spain, after 1997 (Portugal) and 2009 (Netherlands).

2018 Tour de France cycling race

The 2018 Tour de France was the 105th edition of the Tour de France, one of cycling's three Grand Tours. The 3,351 km (2,082 mi)-long race consisted of 21 stages, starting on 7 July in Noirmoutier-en-l'Île, in western France, and concluding on 29 July with the Champs-Élysées stage in Paris. A total of 176 riders from 22 teams participated in the race. The overall general classification was won by Geraint Thomas of Team Sky. Tom Dumoulin placed second, with Thomas's teammate and four-time Tour winner Chris Froome coming third.

The 2017 Vuelta a Asturias was the 60th edition of the Vuelta a Asturias cycling stage race, that took place over three stages from 29 April to 1 May 2017. It was held as part of the 2017 UCI Europe Tour. The defending champion was Hugh Carthy, but Carthy did not defend his title as he had moved to the Cannondale–Drapac squad that was not invited to the race.

Tadej Pogačar cyclist

Tadej Pogačar is a Slovenian cyclist, who currently rides for UCI WorldTeam UAE Team Emirates.

The 2018 Tour of the Basque Country was a road cycling stage race that took place between 2 and 7 April 2018 in Spain. It was the 58th edition of the Tour of the Basque Country and the fourteenth event of the 2018 UCI World Tour.

The 2018 Vuelta a España was a three-week Grand Tour cycling stage race that took place in Spain between 25 August and 16 September 2018. The race was the 73rd edition of the Vuelta a España and was the final Grand Tour of the 2018 cycling season. The race started in Málaga and finished in Madrid.

2019 Giro dItalia cycling race

The 2019 Giro d'Italia was a three-week Grand Tour cycling stage race organised by RCS Sport that took place mainly in Italy, between 11 May and 2 June 2019. The race was the 102nd edition of the Giro d'Italia and was the first Grand Tour of the 2019 cycling season. The race started with an individual time trial in Bologna, and finished with another time-trial in Verona. The race was won by Richard Carapaz, who became the first Ecuadorian rider to win the Giro d'Italia. Italian Vincenzo Nibali (Bahrain–Merida) finished 2nd, with Slovenian rider Primož Roglič in 3rd place. Carapaz also became the second South American rider to win the Giro, after Nairo Quintana in 2014.

References

  1. "UCI reveal WorldTour calendar for 2019". Cycling News. 15 June 2018. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  2. Van Looy, Nicolás (25 August 2018). "Vuelta España 2019: Las Salinas de Torrevieja darán la salida" [Vuelta España 2019: Las Salinas de Torrevieja will give the start]. Ciclo21 (in Spanish). Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  3. "2019 Vuelta a Espana to start in Alicante region with time trial". Cycling News. 24 August 2018. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  4. Roadbook 2019, pp. 23.
  5. https://www.cyclingstage.com/vuelta-2019-favourites/
  6. "Analyzing the Vuelta a España favorites". 2019-08-19.
  7. Fotheringham, Alasdair (19 December 2018). "2019 Vuelta a Espana offers eight mountaintop finishes, goes off road". Cycling News. Retrieved 19 December 2018.
  8. Windsor, Richard (29 July 2019). "Vuelta a España 2019 route: all you need to know about the route for the 74th edition". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  9. Roadbook 2019, pp. 4.
  10. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Roadbook 2019, pp. 6.
  11. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "Official classifications of La Vuelta". La Vuelta. Retrieved 1 September 2019.
  12. "Clasificación de los jóvenes 1" [Youth classification 1](PDF). Tissot Timing (in Spanish). Tissot. 24 August 2019. Retrieved 25 August 2019.

Sources

La Vuelta 2019 Roadbook. Vuelta a España . Unipublic. 2019.