2021 NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament

Last updated
2021 NCAA Division I
Women's Basketball Tournament
2021 NCAA Women's Final Four logo.svg
Season 202021
Teams64
Finals site Alamodome
San Antonio, Texas
Champions Stanford Cardinal (3rd title, 5th title game,
13th Final Four)
Runner-up Arizona Wildcats (1st title game,
1st Final Four)
Semifinalists
Winning coach Tara VanDerveer (3rd title)
MOP Haley Jones (Stanford)
NCAA Division I Women's Tournaments
« 2020 2022 »

The 2021 NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament was a tournament with 64 teams playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of women's NCAA Division I college basketball. Hosted at venues in the state of Texas, the 39th annual edition of the tournament began on March 21, 2021, and concluded with the championship game on April 4, 2021 when the Stanford Cardinal defeated the Arizona Wildcats to become the national champions.

Contents

Due to logistical considerations surrounding the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic (which resulted in the cancellation of the 2020 tournament, and mirroring a similar decision by the men's tournament), the entire tournament was hosted in the San Antonio and Austin areas. The championship game was played at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas, with the University of the Incarnate Word, the University of Texas at San Antonio, and San Antonio Sports serving as hosts.

Four schools, America East champion Stony Brook, Big South champion High Point, Missouri Valley champion Bradley and Utah Valley from the WAC (California Baptist won the WAC tournament, but is ineligible for the NCAA tournament because it is in the third year of a four-year transition from NCAA Division II), made their first appearance in the tournament.

Additionally, Tennessee continued its record streak of making every NCAA Women's Basketball Tournament at 39 consecutive appearances. Arizona made its first ever appearance in the Final Four. UConn extended its record streak of 13 consecutive Final Four appearances. Wake Forest and Washington State made their first appearances since 1988 and 1991, respectively.

Tournament procedure

The tournament's 64 teams consisted of the 31 conference champions (down from 32, due to the Ivy League having cancelled all winter athletics due to COVID-19), [1] and 33 "at-large" bids extended by the Selection Committee.

This tournament was the first since 1983 in which the RPI was not used in the selection process. On May 4, 2020, the NCAA announced that it would replace the RPI with the NET (NCAA Evaluation Tool), a metric that has been used in the selection process for the men's tournament since 2019. The women's version of the NET uses input data specific to the women's game but is otherwise functionally identical to the men's version. [2]

Schedule and venues

On February 5, 2021, the NCAA announced that due to logistical considerations associated with the COVID-19 pandemic (which prompted the cancellation of the 2020 tournament), the entirety of the tournament would be conducted at sites in and around San Antonio and Austin (mirroring a similar decision for the men's tournament, which would similarly use venues in and around its Final Four host city of Indianapolis), rather than across the country; [3]

USA Texas location map.svg
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San Antonio
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Austin
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San Marcos
2021 NCAA tournament venues

First and Second Round (March 21–22, 23–24)

Regional Semifinals and Finals (Sweet Sixteen and Elite Eight) (March 27–30)

National Semifinals and Championship (Final Four and Championship) (April 2 and 4)

The Alamodome had two courts for first- and second-round games, and was converted to a single court for later rounds. Practices were held at the Alamodome and the Henry B. González Convention Center. [4] The regions were named after famous sites in San Antonio: the Alamo, the HemisFair, the Mercado, and the River Walk. [5]

All games were played behind closed doors (with only friends and family present) until the Sweet Sixteen at the Alamodome, which operated at 17% capacity (10,880) for the remainder of the tournament. [6]

Facilities inequality

Concerns over gender inequality were raised prior to the tournament, citing differences in the quality of facilities and amenities between the women's and men's tournament; among other examples, Arizona coach Adia Barnes criticized the lack of weight training equipment in the workout room (consisting of only a single tower of weights, in comparison to the larger weight room of the men's tournament). A video by Oregon forward Sedona Prince showing the aforementioned weight room drew wider attention to the disparity on social media. [7] Other forms of disparities were noted, including differing COVID-19 testing protocols, smaller "swag bags", and different food options. [8] [9]

The NCAA had originally planned for the full weight room to only become available for the Sweet Sixteen round. [7] Vice President of Women's Basketball Lynn Holzman stated that the NCAA had planned to expand the facilities in the workout room over the course of the tournament due to space constraints, but were "actively working to enhance existing resources at practice courts, including additional weight training equipment." Barnes stated that the Henry B. González Convention Center had "plenty of open areas" that could have been used, and that "it takes people like me that were pro players being a voice for things to change. There's a lot of voices out there. People care now. The fact that the NCAA responded so fast, I think that's good. That's meaningful." [10] [11] [7]

In a letter obtained by tournament broadcaster ESPN on March 22, NCAA president Mark Emmert stated that "much has been resolved", but that he would investigate "exactly how we found ourselves in this situation", and "directed our leadership team and appropriate staff to assess all the services, resources, and facilities provided to both the men's and women's teams so that we have a completely clear comparison". [12] The America East conference and Ivy League sent a letter to Emmert, arguing that the incident "warrants a comprehensive discussion once the tournaments conclude about how we—national office staff and membership—can protect and ensure equity across all championships in the future, but especially in the sport of basketball." [9]

The NCAA commissioned an independent review of gender equality among all of its championships. [8] The incident also led to discussions surrounding other forms of inequalities between the men's and women's tournaments, including their difference in budget, no revenue bonuses awarded to schools for winning the tournament, NCAA marketing of "March Madness" having focused almost exclusively on the men's tournament (without the women's tournament having ever officially used the name, or possibly adopting its own distinct branding), and the men's tournament often being referred to as "the NCAA tournament" by media and the general public with no disambiguation. [9] In a Sportico op-ed, America East Conference commissioner Amy Huchthausen accused the NCAA of "restricting women’s basketball from taking advantage of an emerging market", noting that the NCAA's official sponsorships are managed by the CBS Sports/Turner Sports consortium that broadcasts the men's tournament, and that the ESPN contract to televise the women's tournament (which is bundled with those of other NCAA championships) "provides a measure of financial certainty, but it does not provide women's basketball (or any of the other sports, for that matter) an incentive to grow". [13] [14]

Original 2021 NCAA Tournament schedule and venues

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Albany
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Cedar Park
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Cincinnati
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Spokane
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San Antonio
2021 NCAA regional (blue) and Final Four (red) locations as originally selected

The tournament's first two rounds were originally scheduled to be hosted by the top sixteen seeds. The following were the sites initially selected to host the later rounds of the 2021 tournament: [15] [16] [17]

Regional Semifinals and Finals (Sweet Sixteen and Elite Eight) (March 26–29)

National Semifinals and Championship (Final Four and Championship) (April 2 and 4)

This is the third time the women's Final Four will be played in San Antonio, having previously been played in the city in 2002 and 2010.

Qualification and selection

Automatic qualifiers

The following teams automatically qualified for the 2021 NCAA field by virtue of winning their conference's tournament. [lower-alpha 1]

ConferenceTeamRecordAppearanceLast bid
ACC NC State 20–226th2019
America East Stony Brook 15–51stNever
American South Florida 18–37th2018
ASUN Florida Gulf Coast 26–27th2019
Atlantic 10 VCU 16–102nd2009
Big 12 Baylor 25–219th2019
Big East UConn 24–132nd2019
Big Sky Idaho State 22–34th2012
Big South High Point 22–61stNever
Big Ten Maryland 24–228th2019
Big West UC Davis 13–23rd2019
Colonial Drexel 14–82nd2009
C-USA Middle Tennessee 17–719th2016
Horizon Wright State 18–73rd2019
Ivy League Ivy League season canceled
MAAC Marist 18–311th2014
MAC Central Michigan 18–86th2019
MEAC North Carolina A&T 14–25th2018
Missouri Valley Bradley 17–111stNever
Mountain West Wyoming 14–92nd2008
Northeast Mount St. Mary's 17–63rd1995
Ohio Valley Belmont 20–56th2019
Pac-12 Stanford 25–234th2019
Patriot Lehigh 10–54th2010
SEC South Carolina 22–417th2019
Southern Mercer 19–63rd2019
Southland Stephen F. Austin 24–217th2006
SWAC Jackson State 18–55th2008
Summit League South Dakota 19–53rd2019
Sun Belt Troy 22–54th2017
West Coast Gonzaga 23–312th2019
WAC Utah Valley [lower-alpha 1] 13–61stNever
  1. 1 2 California Baptist won the WAC Tournament, but was ineligible for the NCAA Tournament due to its transition from Division II and instead played in the WNIT. Utah Valley received the WAC's bid by finishing in second place behind California Baptist in the regular season.

Tournament seeds

Alamo Regional – Alamodome,
San Antonio, Texas
SeedSchoolConferenceRecordNETBerth type
1 Stanford Pac-12 25–21Automatic
2 Louisville ACC 23–36At-Large
3 Georgia SEC 20–613At-Large
4 Arkansas SEC 19–817At-Large
5 Missouri State Missouri Valley 21–220At-Large
6 Oregon Pac-12 13–810At-Large
7 Northwestern Big Ten 15–831At-Large
8 Oklahoma State Big 12 18–827At-Large
9 Wake Forest ACC 12–1247At-Large
10 UCF American 16–438At-Large
11 South Dakota Summit 19–532Automatic
12 UC Davis Big West 13–271Automatic
13 Wright State Horizon 18–780Automatic
14 Drexel Colonial 14–8106Automatic
15 Marist MAAC 18–3103Automatic
16 Utah Valley WAC 13–6216Automatic
HemisFair Regional – Alamodome,
San Antonio, Texas
SeedSchoolConferenceRecordNETBerth type
1 South Carolina SEC 22–44Automatic
2 Maryland Big Ten 24–25Automatic
3 UCLA Pac-12 16–58At-Large
4 West Virginia Big 12 21–624At-Large
5 Georgia Tech ACC 15–830At-Large
6 Texas Big 12 18–929At-Large
7 Alabama SEC 16–933At-Large
8 Oregon State Pac-12 11–736At-Large
9 Florida State ACC 10–848At-Large
10 North Carolina ACC 13–1035At-Large
11 Bradley Missouri Valley 17–1179Automatic
12 Stephen F. Austin Southland 24–219Automatic
13 Lehigh Patriot 10–575Automatic
14 Wyoming Mountain West 14–999Automatic
15 Mount St. Mary's Northeast 17–6114Automatic
16 Mercer Southern 19–6146Automatic
Mercado Regional – Alamodome,
San Antonio, Texas
SeedSchoolConferenceRecordNETBerth type
1 NC State ACC 20–27Automatic
2 Texas A&M SEC 23–211At-Large
3 Arizona Pac-12 16–515At-Large
4 Indiana Big Ten 18–59At-Large
5 Gonzaga WCC 23–316Automatic
6 Rutgers Big Ten 14–412At-Large
7 Iowa State Big 12 16–1026At-Large
8 South Florida American 18–325Automatic
9 Washington State Pac-12 12–1145At-Large
10 Michigan State Big Ten 15–840At-Large
11 BYU WCC 18–550At-Large
12 Belmont Ohio Valley 20–563Automatic
13 VCU Atlantic 10 16–10105Automatic
14 Stony Brook America East 15–5100Automatic
15 Troy Sun Belt 22–5115Automatic
16 North Carolina A&T MEAC 14–2123Automatic
River Walk Regional – Alamodome,
San Antonio, Texas
SeedSchoolConferenceRecordNETBerth type
1 UConn Big East 24–12Automatic
2 Baylor Big 12 25–23Automatic
3 Tennessee SEC 16–714At-Large
4 Kentucky SEC 17–818At-Large
5 Iowa Big Ten 18–923At-Large
6 Michigan Big Ten 14–522At-Large
7 Virginia Tech ACC 14–928At-Large
8 Syracuse ACC 14–843At-Large
9 South Dakota State Summit 21–346At-Large
10 Marquette Big East 19–634At-Large
11 Florida Gulf Coast ASUN 26–241Automatic
12 Central Michigan MAC 18–890Automatic
13 Idaho State Big Sky 22–384Automatic
14 Middle Tennessee C-USA 17–7107Automatic
15 Jackson State SWAC 18–5111Automatic
16 High Point Big South 22–6180Automatic

Bracket

All times are listed as Central Daylight Time (UTC−5)
* – Denotes overtime period

Alamo Regional – San Antonio, Texas

First Round
Round of 64
March 21–22
Second Round
Round of 32
March 23–24
Regional Semifinals
Sweet Sixteen
March 28
Regional Final
Elite Eight
March 30
            
1Stanford87
16 Utah Valley 44
1Stanford73
Alamodome (March 21)
Bill Greehey Arena (March 21)
8 Oklahoma State 62
8Oklahoma State84
9 Wake Forest 61
1Stanford89
Convocation Center (March 23)
Convocation Center (March 24)
5 Missouri State 62
5Missouri State70
12 UC Davis 51
5Missouri State64
Bill Greehey Arena (March 22)
Frank Erwin Center (March 22)
13 Wright State 39
4 Arkansas 62
13Wright State66
1Stanford78
2 Louisville 63
6Oregon67
11 South Dakota 47
6Oregon57
Alamodome (March 22)
Bill Greehey Arena (March 22)
3 Georgia 50
3Georgia67
14 Drexel 53
6 Oregon 42
Alamodome (March 24)
Alamodome (March 24)
2Louisville60
7Northwestern62
10 UCF 51
7 Northwestern 53
Bill Greehey Arena (March 22)
Alamodome (March 22)
2Louisville62
2Louisville74
15 Marist 43

* – Denotes overtime period

Alamo Regional Final

ESPN
March 30
8:00pm
#2 Louisville Cardinals 63, #1 Stanford Cardinal78
Scoring by quarter: 21–13, 17–13, 12–22, 13–30
Pts: D. Evans, 24
Rebs: M. Robinson, 8
Asts: D. Evans, K. Smith, M. Robinson, 3
Pts: Le. Hull, 21
Rebs: H. Jones, 10
Asts: K. Williams, 5
Alamodome – San Antonio, Texas
Attendance: 1,463
Referees: Katie Lukanich, Michael Price, Cheryl Flores

HemisFair Regional – San Antonio, Texas

First Round
Round of 64
March 21–22
Second Round
Round of 32
March 23–24
Regional Semifinals
Sweet Sixteen
March 28
Regional Final
Elite Eight
March 30
            
1South Carolina79
16 Mercer 53
1South Carolina59
Alamodome (March 21)
Strahan Arena (March 21)
8 Oregon State 42
8Oregon State83
9 Florida State 59
1South Carolina76
Alamodome (March 23)
Convocation Center (March 23)
5 Georgia Tech 65
5Georgia Tech54*
12 Stephen F. Austin 52
5Georgia Tech73
Bill Greehey Arena (March 21)
Bill Greehey Arena (March 21)
4 West Virginia 56
4West Virginia77
13 Lehigh 53
1South Carolina62
6 Texas 34
6Texas81
11 Bradley 62
6Texas71
Strahan Arena (March 22)
Frank Erwin Center (March 22)
3 UCLA 62
3UCLA69
14 Wyoming 48
6Texas64
Alamodome (March 24)
Bill Greehey Arena (March 24)
2 Maryland 61
7Alabama80
10 North Carolina 71
7 Alabama 64
Alamodome (March 22)
Alamodome (March 22)
2 Maryland100
2Maryland98
15 Mount St. Mary's 45

* – Denotes overtime period

HemisFair Regional Final

ESPN
March 30
6:00pm
#6 Texas Longhorns 34, #1 South Carolina Gamecocks62
Scoring by quarter: 7–18, 15–19, 12–15, 0–10
Pts: A. Warren, 13
Rebs: C. Taylor, L. Ebo, 7
Asts: J. Allen-Taylor, 3
Pts: Z. Cooke, 16
Rebs: A. Boston, B. Beal, L. Amihere, V. Saxton, 8
Asts: D. Henderson, 7
Alamodome – San Antonio, Texas
Attendance: 0
Referees: Joseph Vaszily, Infini Robinson, Pualani Spurlock

Mercado Regional – San Antonio, Texas

First Round
Round of 64
March 21–22
Second Round
Round of 32
March 23–24
Regional Semifinals
Sweet Sixteen
March 27
Regional Final
Elite Eight
March 29
            
1NC State79
16 North Carolina A&T 58
1NC State79
Strahan Arena (March 21)
Frank Erwin Center (March 21)
8 South Florida 67
8South Florida57
9 Washington State 53
1 NC State 70
Alamodome (March 23)
Bill Greehey Arena (March 24)
4Indiana73
5 Gonzaga 59
12Belmont64
12 Belmont 48
Strahan Arena (March 22)
Convocation Center (March 22)
4Indiana70
4Indiana63
13 VCU 32
4 Indiana 53
3Arizona66
6 Rutgers 66
11BYU69
11 BYU 46
Strahan Arena (March 22)
Alamodome (March 22)
3Arizona52
3Arizona79
14 Stony Brook 44
3Arizona74
Convocation Center (March 24)
Alamodome (March 24)
2 Texas A&M 59
7Iowa State79
10 Michigan State 75
7 Iowa State 82
Alamodome (March 22)
Frank Erwin Center (March 22)
2Texas A&M84*
2Texas A&M84
15 Troy 80

* – Denotes overtime period

Mercado Regional Final

ESPN
March 29
8:00pm
#4 Indiana Hoosiers 53, #3 Arizona Wildcats66
Scoring by quarter: 11–14, 12–13, 21–19, 9–20
Pts: M. Holmes, 20
Rebs: A. Gulbe, 9
Asts: G. Berger, 4
Pts: A. McDonald, 33
Rebs: A. McDonald, 11
Asts: A. McDonald, 4
Alamodome – San Antonio, Texas
Attendance: 0
Referees: Felicia Grinter, Tiara Cruse, Tiffany Bird

River Walk Regional – San Antonio, Texas

First Round
Round of 64
March 21
Second Round
Round of 32
March 23
Regional Semifinals
Sweet Sixteen
March 27
Regional Final
Elite Eight
March 29
            
1UConn102
16 High Point 59
1UConn83
Alamodome (March 21)
Frank Erwin Center (March 21)
8 Syracuse 47
8Syracuse72
9 South Dakota State 55
1UConn92
Alamodome (March 23)
Bill Greehey Arena (March 23)
5 Iowa 72
5Iowa87
12 Central Michigan 72
5Iowa86
Alamodome (March 21)
Alamodome (March 21)
4 Kentucky 72
4Kentucky71
13 Idaho State 63
1UConn69
2 Baylor 67
6Michigan87
11 Florida Gulf Coast 66
6Michigan70
Convocation Center (March 21)
Frank Erwin Center (March 21)
3 Tennessee 55
3Tennessee87
14 Middle Tennessee 62
6 Michigan 75
Alamodome (March 23)
Bill Greehey Arena (March 23)
2Baylor78*
7Virginia Tech70
10 Marquette 63
7 Virginia Tech 48
Strahan Arena (March 21)
Alamodome (March 21)
2Baylor90
2Baylor101
15 Jackson State 52

* – Denotes overtime period

River Walk Regional Final

ESPN
March 29
6:00pm
#2 Baylor Lady Bears 67, #1 UConn Huskies69
Scoring by quarter: 24–26, 15–11, 16–16, 12–16
Pts: D. Carrington, 22
Rebs: N. Smith, 13
Asts: N. Smith, M. Ursin, D. Carrington, 3
Pts: P. Bueckers, 28
Rebs: O. Nelson-Ododa, 8
Asts: O. Nelson-Ododa, 4
Alamodome – San Antonio, Texas
Attendance: 3,377
Referees: Lisa Jones, Brian Hall, Karen Preato

Final Four

During the Final Four round, Stanford, the winner of the Alamo Regional defeated South Carolina, the winner of the HemisFair Regional. Arizona, the winner of the Mercado Regional defeated UConn, the winner of the River Walk Regional. In the championship game, Stanford defeated Arizona by a score of 54-53 to take the 2021 title.

Alamodome – San Antonio, Texas

National Semifinals
Final Four
April 2
National Championship Game
April 4
      
A1Stanford66
H1 South Carolina 65
A1Stanford54
M3 Arizona 53
M3Arizona69
RW1 UConn 59

National Semifinals

ESPN
April 2
5:00 pm
A1 Stanford Cardinal66, H1 South Carolina Gamecocks 65
Scoring by quarter: 15–15, 16–10, 21–24, 14–16
Pts: H. Jones, 24
Rebs: Le. Hull, 13
Asts: Le. Hull, 4
Pts: Z. Cooke, 25
Rebs: A. Boston, 16
Asts: D. Henderson, 3
Alamodome – San Antonio, Texas
Attendance: 0
Referees: Eric Brewton, Brenda Pantoja, Gina Cross
ESPN
April 2
8:30 pm
M3 Arizona Wildcats69, RW1 UConn Huskies 59
Scoring by quarter: 16–10, 16–12, 16–17, 21–20
Pts: A. McDonald, 26
Rebs: H. Pueyo, 8
Asts: B. Yeaney, 4
Pts: C. Williams, 20
Rebs: A. Edwards, 7
Asts: P. Bueckers, 4
Alamodome – San Antonio, Texas
Attendance: 4,793
Referees: Chuck Gonzalez, Dee Kantner, Pualani Spurlock-Welsh

National Championship

ESPN
April 4
5:00 pm
A1 Stanford Cardinal54, M3 Arizona Wildcats 53
Scoring by quarter: 16–8, 15–16, 12–16, 11–13
Pts: H. Jones, 17
Rebs: Le. Hull, 10
Asts: A. Prechtel, A. Wilson, K. Williams, 3
Pts: A. McDonald, 22
Rebs: S. Thomas, S. Pellington, 7
Asts: A. McDonald, T. Baptiste, 2
Alamodome – San Antonio, Texas
Attendance: 4,604
Referees: Cheryl Flores, Maj Forsberg, Felicia Grinter

Final Four all-tournament team

Record by conference

ConferenceBidsRecordWin %R64R32S16E8F4CGNC
Pac-12 615–5.7506532221
Big East 24–2.66721111
SEC 710–7.58876211
ACC 89–8.5298531
Big 12 59–5.6435522
Big Ten 710–7.5887541
Missouri Valley 22–2.500211
WCC 21–2.33321
American 21–2.33321
Horizon 11–1.50011
Ohio Valley 11–1.50011
Summit 20–2.0002
MAC 10–1.0001
Southland 10–1.0001
C-USA 10–1.0001
SWAC 10–1.0001
MEAC 10–1.0001
Atlantic 10 10–1.0001
Mountain West 10–1.0001
America East 10–1.0001
Atlantic Sun 10–1.0001
Big Sky 10–1.0001
Big South 10–1.0001
Big West 10–1.0001
Colonial 10–1.0001
MAAC 10–1.0001
Patriot 10–1.0001
Southern 10–1.0001
WAC 10–1.0001
Sun Belt 10–1.0001
Northeast 10–1.0001

    Media coverage

    Television

    ESPN served as broadcaster of the tournament, as part of its multi-year deal to broadcast NCAA national championships. Rather than primarily employ regional telecasts and whiparound formats, ESPN announced that all games in the tournament would be televised nationally in their entirety by either ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU, or, for the first time, ABC (following a similar broadcast arrangement to the men's tournament under the CBS/Turner consortium), rather than use the previous regional broadcasts and "whiparound" feeds. This marked the first women's tournament to include coverage on broadcast television since 1995. [19]

    Kerry Callahan became the first woman to serve as producer for ESPN's coverage of the Women's Final Four. [20]

    Studio host and analysts

    • Maria Taylor (Host) (First, Second Rounds, Regionals, Final Four, and National Championship Game)
    • Kelsey Riggs (Host) (First Round)
    • Andy Landers (Analyst) (First, Second Rounds, Regionals, Final Four, and National Championship Game)
    • Rebecca Lobo (Analyst) (First and Second Rounds)
    • Carolyn Peck (Analyst) (Regionals, Final Four, and National Championship Game)
    • Andraya Carter (Analyst) (First Round)
    • Monica McNutt (Analyst) (First Round)

    Broadcast assignments

    Radio

    Westwood One has exclusive radio rights to the entire tournament. [21] [22] Teams participating in the Elite Eight, Final Four, and Championship will be allowed to have their own local broadcasts, but they won’t be allowed to stream those broadcasts online.

    Regional Finals

    Final Four and Championship

    See also

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    The UTSA Roadrunners is a collegiate athletic program that represents the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). The UTSA Roadrunners are also commonly referred to as "UTSA", "Roadrunners", or simply "Runners" and are represented by the mascot Rowdy. The origin of Rowdy dates back to 1977, when the Roadrunner was chosen as the university's mascot by student election. The Roadrunners compete in the NCAA Division I Conference USA in 17 varsity sports. UTSA is San Antonio's only institution that competes in Division I FBS. UTSA joined the Western Athletic Conference on July 1, 2012. In April 2012, it was announced that UTSA would join Conference USA on July 1, 2013. The UTSA Cheer team has garnered two National Cheerleading Associations’ (NCA) collegiate national championships, first in 2012 and again in 2021. The cheer team has also secured a pair of top 5 finishes in 2019.

    2013 NCAA Division I Mens Basketball Tournament United States top collegiate-level basketball tournament for 2013; 75th anniversary of the NCAA Tournament

    The 2013 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament was a single-elimination tournament that involved 68 teams playing to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 19, 2013, and concluded with the championship game on April 8, 2013, at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. This was the 75th edition of the NCAA Men's Basketball Championship, dating to 1939.

    2014 NCAA Division I Mens Basketball Tournament

    The 2014 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament involved 68 teams playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 18, 2014, and concluded with the UConn Huskies winning the championship game on April 7 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

    2016 NCAA Division I Mens Basketball Tournament

    The 2016 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament involved 68 teams playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the men's National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college basketball national champion for the 2015–16 season. The 78th edition of the Tournament began on March 15, 2016, and concluded with the championship game on April 4 at NRG Stadium in Houston, Texas.

    2018 NCAA Division I Mens Basketball Tournament

    The 2018 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament was a single-elimination tournament of 68 teams to determine the men's National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college basketball national champion for the 2017–18 season. The 80th annual edition of the tournament began on March 13, 2018, and concluded with the championship game on April 2 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

    2018 NCAA Division I Womens Basketball Tournament

    The 2018 NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament began on March 16, 2018, and concluded with the national championship game on Sunday, April 1. The Final Four was played at Nationwide Arena in Columbus, Ohio. This is the third time that the women's Final Four was played in Ohio after previously being held in Cincinnati in 1997 and Cleveland in 2007 and the first time that the women's Final Four was played in Columbus. For only the fourth time in the tournament’s 37-year history, all four of the number one seeds made it to the Final Four.

    2019 NCAA Division I Womens Basketball Tournament

    The 2019 NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament was a single-elimination tournament of 64 teams to determine the national champion for the 2018–19 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The 38th annual edition of the tournament began on March 22, and concluded with the championship game on April 7 at Amalie Arena in Tampa, Florida, with the University of South Florida serving as host. The tournament field was announced on March 18.

    2020 NCAA Division I Womens Basketball Tournament

    The 2020 NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament was scheduled to be played in March and April 2020, with the Final Four played Friday, April 3 and Sunday, April 5 to determine the champion of the 2019–20 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Final Four was planned to be played at the Smoothie King Center in New Orleans, Louisiana, with the University of New Orleans, Tulane University and the Sun Belt Conference serving as hosts. This is the fourth time that New Orleans has been selected as a women's Final Four location and third time at the Smoothie King Center ; the 1991 Final Four was contested at the University of New Orleans' Lakefront Arena. ESPN had planned to nationally televise all 63 games of the women's tournament for the first time ever.

    2021 NCAA Division I Mens Basketball Tournament American collegiate basketball competition in 2021

    The 2021 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament was a single-elimination tournament of 68 teams to determine the men's National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college basketball national champion for the 2020–21 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The 82nd edition of the tournament began play on March 18 in sites around the state of Indiana, and concluded with the championship game at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis on April 5, with the Baylor Bears defeating the previously undefeated Gonzaga Bulldogs 86–70 to earn the club's first ever title.

    2022 NCAA Division I Mens Basketball Tournament

    The 2022 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament will involve 68 teams playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. The 83rd annual edition of the tournament is scheduled to begin on March 15, 2022, and will conclude with the championship game on April 4 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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