2022 Women's Africa Cup of Nations

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2022 Women's Africa Cup of Nations
  • كأس الأمم الإفريقية للسيدات 2022
  • Coupe d'Afrique des nations féminine 2022
2022 WAFCON (logo).png
Official logo
Tournament details
Host countryMorocco
Dates2–23 July
Teams12
Venue(s)3 (in 2 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of South Africa.svg  South Africa (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of Morocco.svg  Morocco
Third placeFlag of Zambia.svg  Zambia
Fourth placeFlag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Tournament statistics
Matches played28
Goals scored63 (2.25 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Morocco.svg Ghizlane Chebbak
Flag of Nigeria.svg Rasheedat Ajibade
Flag of South Africa.svg Hildah Magaia
(3 goals each)
Best player(s) Flag of Morocco.svg Ghizlane Chebbak
Best goalkeeper Flag of South Africa.svg Andile Dlamini
Fair play awardFlag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
2024

The 2022 Women's Africa Cup of Nations (Arabic : كأس الأمم الإفريقية للسيدات 2022, French : Coupe d'Afrique des nations féminine 2022), (also referred to as WAFCON 2022) officially known as the 2022 TotalEnergies Women's Africa Cup of Nations for sponsorship purposes, was the 14th edition of the biennial African international women's football tournament organized by the Confederation of African Football (CAF), hosted by Morocco from 2 to 23 July 2022. [1] [2]

Contents

The tournament also doubled as the African qualifiers to the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup. The top four teams qualified for the World Cup, and two more teams advanced to the inter-confederation play-offs. [3]

Nigeria were the three-time defending champions, having won the previous 3 editions in 2014, 2016 and 2018; but had its journey ended in the semi-finals after losing to the hosts Morocco on penalties, making it for the first time neither Nigeria or Equatorial Guinea featured in the final. The hosts went on to lose to South Africa in the final, as South Africa claimed its first ever continental trophy after five previous attempts. With this triumph, South Africa joined Nigeria as the only countries to have won both the men's and women's competition.

This was the first edition to feature 12 teams as the 2020 edition, which would have been the first, was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Africa. The Morocco vs Nigeria semi-final broke the WAFCON attendance records with 45,562 spectators. [4]

Host selection

Morocco were announced as hosts on 15 January 2021. [2] This is the first time a North African Arab country has hosted the Women's Africa Cup of Nations.

Mascot

The mascot for this edition of the tournament was unveiled as "TITRIT" (a Moroccan Berber name meaning "star" or "celebrity"), a young lioness clothed with the home jersey of the host nation's national football team, with a traditional Moroccan tiara. [5]

Qualification

Morocco qualified automatically as hosts, while the remaining eleven spots were determined by the qualifying rounds.

Qualified teams

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Qualified
Did not qualify
Did not enter or withdrew
Not part of CAF 2022 Women's Africa Cup of Nations qualification.png
  Qualified
  Did not qualify
  Did not enter or withdrew
  Not part of CAF
TeamFinals appearanceLast appearanceDate of qualificationPrevious best performancePrevious World Cup
appearances
FIFA ranking at start of event
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco (hosts)3rd 2000 15 January 2021Group stage (1998, 2000)077
Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 2nd 2000 28 January 2022Group stage (2000)0156
Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi 1st21 February 2022Debut0169
Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia 4th 2018 22 February 2022Quarter finals (1995)0103
Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 2nd 2012 22 February 2022Group stage (2012)089
Flag of Togo.svg  Togo 1st23 February 2022Debut0118
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 14th 2018 23 February 2022Champions (1991, 1995, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2016, 2018)839
Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia 2nd 2008 23 February 2022Group stage (2008)072
Flag of Burkina Faso.svg  Burkina Faso 1st23 February 2022Debut0138
Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana 1st23 February 2022Debut0152
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 13th 2018 23 February 2022Runners-up (1991, 2004, 2014, 2016)254
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 13th 2018 23 February 2022Runners-up (1995, 2000, 2008, 2012, 2018)158

Venues

The tournament was held in Casablanca and Rabat.

Morocco Rabat Casablanca
Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium Stade Moulay Hassan Stade Mohammed V
Capacity: 50,000Capacity: 12,000Capacity: 45,891
Stade Prince Moulay Abdellah.jpg Stade My Hassan.jpg Stade Mohamed V, Casablanca.jpg

Squads

Match officials

A total of 16 referees, 16 assistant referees and 8 VAR referees were appointed for the tournament. [6] [7]

Originally, Fatima El Ajjani (Morocco) was assigned as video assistant referee only. However, she was assigned as principal referee during the tournament after Aïssata Boudy Lam (Mauritania) sustained an injury.

Referees
Assistant referees
Video assistant referees

Draw

The final draw was held in Rabat, Morocco on 29 April 2022 at 20:30 GMT (UTC±0). [8] The twelve teams were drawn into three groups of four teams, with the hosts Morocco, reigning champions Nigeria, and next-highest-ranked Cameroon assigned to positions A1, C1, and B1, respectively. [9]

SeedsPot 1

Group stage

CAF released the official match schedule for the tournament on 29 April 2022. [10]

All times are local, (UTC+1).

Tiebreakers

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco (H)330051+49 Knockout stage
2Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 320131+26
3Flag of Burkina Faso.svg  Burkina Faso 30122421
4Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 30123741
Source: CAF (archived)
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
(H) Hosts
Morocco  Flag of Morocco.svg1–0Flag of Burkina Faso.svg  Burkina Faso
  • Chebbak Soccerball shade.svg29'
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Senegal  Flag of Senegal.svg2–0Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium, Rabat
Referee: Dorsaf Ganouati (Tunisia)

Burkina Faso  Flag of Burkina Faso.svg0–1Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Fall Soccerball shade.svg84' (pen.)
Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium, Rabat
Referee: Suavis Iratunga (Burundi)
Uganda  Flag of Uganda.svg1–3Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium, Rabat
Referee: Vincentia Amedome (Togo)

Burkina Faso  Flag of Burkina Faso.svg2–2Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Mohammed V, Casablanca
Referee: Patience Madu (Nigeria)

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia 321051+47 Knockout stage
2Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 312031+25
3Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia 31024403
4Flag of Togo.svg  Togo 30123961
Source: CAF (archived)
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Cameroon  Flag of Cameroon.svg0–0Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Mohammed V, Casablanca
Referee: Aïssata Boudy Lam [note 1] (Mauritania)
Tunisia  Flag of Tunisia.svg4–1Flag of Togo.svg  Togo
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Mohammed V, Casablanca
Referee: Antsino Twanyanyukwa (Namibia)

Zambia  Flag of Zambia.svg1–0Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Mohammed V, Casablanca
Referee: Maria Rivet (Mauritius)
Togo  Flag of Togo.svg1–1Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Mohammed V, Casablanca
Referee: Zomadre Kore (Ivory Coast)

Cameroon  Flag of Cameroon.svg2–0Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Zambia  Flag of Zambia.svg4–1Flag of Togo.svg  Togo
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Woedikou Soccerball shade.svg35'
Stade Moulay Hassan, Rabat
Referee: Shamira Nabadda (Uganda)

Group C

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 330062+49 Knockout stage
2Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 320172+56
3Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana 31024513
4Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi 300331180
Source: CAF (archived)
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg1–2Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Moulay Hassan, Rabat
Referee: Bouchra Karboubi (Morocco)
Burundi  Flag of Burundi.svg2–4Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Moulay Hassan, Rabat
Referee: Mame Faye (Senegal)

South Africa  Flag of South Africa.svg3–1Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Moulay Hassan, Rabat
Referee: Shahenda El-Maghrabi (Egypt)
Botswana  Flag of Botswana.svg0–2Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Moulay Hassan, Rabat
Referee: Letticia Viana (Eswatini)

South Africa  Flag of South Africa.svg1–0Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium, Rabat
Referee: Dorsaf Ganouati (Tunisia)
Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg4–0Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Moulay Hassan, Rabat
Referee: Fatima El Ajjani (Morocco)

Ranking of third-placed teams

PosGrpTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1 B Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia 31024403 Knockout stage
2 C Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana 31024513
3 A Flag of Burkina Faso.svg  Burkina Faso 30122421
Source: CAF (archived)

Knockout stage

Bracket

 
Quarter finals Semi finals Final
 
          
 
13 July – Rabat (Prince Moulay Abdellah)
 
 
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco 2
 
18 July – Rabat (Prince Moulay Abdellah)
 
Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana 1
 
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco (p) 1 (5)
 
14 July – Casablanca
 
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 1 (4)
 
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 0
 
23 July – Rabat (Prince Moulay Abdellah)
 
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 1
 
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco 1
 
13 July – Casablanca
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 2
 
Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia (p) 1 (4)
 
18 July – Casablanca
 
Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 1 (2)
 
Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia 0
 
14 July – Rabat (Moulay Hassan)
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 1 Third place
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 1
 
22 July – Casablanca
 
Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia 0
 
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0
 
 
Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia 1
 
Repechage
          
17 July – Rabat (Moulay Hassan)
Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana 0
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 1
17 July – Casablanca
Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal (p) 0 (4)
Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia 0 (2)

Quarter-finals

The winners qualified for the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup. The losers entered a repechage round.

Zambia  Flag of Zambia.svg1–1 (a.e.t.)Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Penalties
4–2
Stade Mohammed V, Casablanca
Referee: Bouchra Karboubi (Morocco)

Morocco  Flag of Morocco.svg2–1Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium, Rabat
Referee: Vincentia Amedome (Togo)

Cameroon  Flag of Cameroon.svg0–1Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)

South Africa  Flag of South Africa.svg1–0Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)

Repechage

The winners advanced to the inter-confederation play-offs.

Senegal  Flag of Senegal.svg0–0Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Penalties
4–2
Stade Mohammed V, Casablanca
Referee: Letticia Viana (Eswatini)

Botswana  Flag of Botswana.svg0–1Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Moulay Hassan, Rabat
Referee: Suavis Iratunga (Burundi)

Semi-finals

Zambia  Flag of Zambia.svg0–1Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)

Morocco  Flag of Morocco.svg1–1 (a.e.t.)Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Penalties
5–4
Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium, Rabat
Attendance: 45,562 [11]
Referee: Maria Rivet (Mauritius)

Third place play-off

Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg0–1Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia
Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Stade Mohammed V, Casablanca
Referee: Vincentia Amedome (Togo)

Final

Morocco  Flag of Morocco.svg1–2Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
Ayane Soccerball shade.svg80' Report (FIFA)
Report (CAF)
Magaia Soccerball shade.svg63', 71'

Goalscorers

There were 63 goals scored in 28 matches, for an average of 2.25 goals per match.

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

Awards

The following awards were given at the conclusion of the tournament: [12]

AwardWinner
Best player Flag of Morocco.svg Ghizlane Chebbak
Best goalkeeper Flag of South Africa.svg Andile Dlamini
Top scorer Flag of Morocco.svg Ghizlane Chebbak
Flag of Nigeria.svg Rasheedat Ajibade
Flag of South Africa.svg Hildah Magaia
Fair PlayFlag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
Best XI [13]
GoalkeeperDefendersMidfieldersForwards
Flag of South Africa.svg Andile Dlamini

Qualified teams for the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup

The following teams will represent Africa directly at the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup, while two more teams will have opportunities to join them through the inter-confederation playoffs.

TeamQualified onPrevious appearances in FIFA Women's World Cup 1
Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia 13 July 20220 (debut)
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco 13 July 20220 (debut)
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 14 July 20228 (1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015, 2019)
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 14 July 20221 (2019)
1Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.

Notes

  1. Referee Aïssata Boudy Lam was replaced by fourth official Lidya Tafesse (Ethiopia) due to injury at the 64th minute.

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