2nd Nepalese Constituent Assembly

Last updated
Second Constituent Assembly of Nepal
1st Constituent Assembly 1st Federal Parliament
Nepalese Constituent Assembly Building.jpg
Overview
Legislative bodyConstituent Assembly of Nepal
Meeting place International Convention Centre
Term2014 – 2017
Election 2013 Nepalese Constituent Assembly election
Government Sushil Koirala cabinet
First Oli cabinet
Second Dahal cabinet
Fourth Deuba cabinet
Members601

The Second Constituent Assembly of Nepal, later converted to the Legislature Parliament (Nepali : व्यवस्थापिका संसद), was a unicameral legislature of Nepal. [1] It was elected in the 2013 Constituent Assembly elections after the failure of the first Constituent Assembly to promulgate a new constitution. [2] The Assembly converted into a legislative parliament after the constitution was promulgated in 2015. The legislature parliament's term ended on 14 October 2017. [3]

Contents

Opening

Former Prime Minister Surya Bahadur Thapa, the oldest member of the house, assumed chairmanship of the CA on January 20, 2014 [4] and administered the oath of office to 565 lawmakers at the first meeting of the assembly on January 21, 2014. [5] Leaders of the NC, CPN-UML and UCPN (Maoist) pledged to draft a new constitution within a year. [6] More than 80% of the members were new faces. [7]

Power-sharing discussions

On January 26, 2014, President Ram Baran Yadav called for the election of a Prime Minister and the formation of a consensus government within a week [8] as per article 38(1) of the constitution which provided for the formation of government through political understanding. [9] The Nepali Congress obtained the support of the CPN-UML for a NC-led consensus government [10] and the two parties also agreed to hold local body elections within six months and adopt a new constitution within a year. [11] An all-party meeting followed at which the CPN-UML, UCPN (Maoist) and MPRF-Loktantrik expressed support for a government under Sushil Koirala. The RPP-N boycotted the meeting. [12] Further discussions were held between the NC, CPN-UML and UCPN (Maoist) at which the Maoists expressed support for the idea of a NC-led government but did not agree to join the government and decided to stay in opposition. [13] On February 2, 2014, the NC abandoned its pursuit of a consensus government under article 38(1) of the constitution after the UCPN (Maoist) and RPP-N, the third and fourth largest parties, decided not to join the government. The party then initiated talks with the CPN-UML to form a majority government under article 38(2) of the constitution. [14] [15]

Composition

A total of thirty political parties and two independents were represented at the start of the second constituent assembly. However, some parties later merged and the number of parties declined. [16] [17]

PartyLeader in ParliamentSeats
Nepali Congress Sher Bahadur Deuba [18] 207
Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist–Leninist) Khadga Prasad Oli [19] 181
Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist-Centre) Pushpa Kamal Dahal [20] 82
Rastriya Prajatantra Party Kamal Thapa [21] 37
Rastriya Janata Party NepalMahendra Yadav [22] 24
Nepal Democratic Forum Bijay Kumar Gachhadar 18
Federal Socialist Forum Nepal Ashok Rai 15
Communist Party of Nepal (Marxist–Leninist) CP Mainali 5
Nepal Workers Peasants Party Narayan Man Bijukchhe 4
Rastriya Janamorcha Chitra Bahadur K.C. 3
Communist Party of Nepal (United) Sunil Babu Pant 3
Nepal Pariwar Dal Ek Nath Dhakal 2
Akhanda Nepal Party Kumar Khadka1
Nepali Janata Dal Hari Charan Sah1
Khambuwan Rastriya Morcha, Nepal Ram Kumar Rai1
Bouddhik Prajatantrik ParishadLaxman Rajbanshi1
Jana Jagaran Party Nepal Lokmani Dhakal1
Sanghiya Sadbhawna Party Dimple Kumari Jha1
Socialist People's PartyPrem Bahadur Singh1
Federal Democratic National Forum (Tharuhat) Rukmini Chaudhary 1
Bahujan Shakti PartyBiswendra Paswan1
Naya Shakti Party, Nepal Ganga Satgauwa Chaudhary1
Independents-2

Committees

The following parliamentary committees were formed: [23]

See also

Related Research Articles

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