317 Roxane

Last updated
317 Roxane
Orbit of 371 Roxane.gif
Orbit of 371 Roxane
Discovery
Discovered by Auguste Charlois
Discovery date11 September 1891
Designations
(317) Roxane
PronunciationFrench:  [ʁɔksan]
Main belt
Orbital characteristics [1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 124.03 yr (45302 d)
Aphelion 2.4832  AU (371.48  Gm)
Perihelion 2.0901 AU (312.67 Gm)
2.2866 AU (342.07 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.085956
3.46 yr (1263.0 d)
39.3360°
 17m 6.18s / day
Inclination 1.7657°
151.38°
186.926°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions18.67±1.4  km
8.169  h (0.3404  d)
0.4928±0.083
E
10.03

    Roxane (minor planet designation: 317 Roxane) is an asteroid from the asteroid belt approximately 19 km in diameter. It was discovered by Auguste Charlois from Nice on September 11, 1891. The name was chosen by F. Bidschof, an assistant at the Vienna Observatory, at Charlois' request; Bidschof chose to name it after Roxana, the wife of Alexander the Great, and at first used the spelling "Roxana". [2] [3] [4]

    Contents

    In 2008, a team identified Roxane as the closest known spectroscopic match for the Peña Blanca Spring meteorite that landed in a swimming pool in Texas in 1946. There is a possibility, therefore, that 317 Roxane is from the same parent object as this meteorite. [5]

    In 2009, a team using the Gemini North adaptive optics telescope discovered a moon orbiting Roxane. The moon is named Olympias, after the mother of Alexander the Great who was the king of Macedonia and husband of Roxana. Prior to its naming, the moon was provisionally named S/2009 (317) 1. [6] It measures 5 km in diameter and orbits 245 km from Roxane, completing one orbit every 13 days. [7]

    See also

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    References

    1. "317 Roxane". JPL Small-Body Database . NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory . Retrieved 11 May 2016.
    2. Lutz Schmadel (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 42. ISBN   978-3-540-00238-3.
    3. Charlois, A.; Benennung von kleinen Planeten, Astronomische Nachrichten, Vol. 132, No. 3155, p. 175
    4. Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(317) Roxane". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (317) Roxane. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 42. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_318. ISBN   978-3-540-00238-3.
    5. Fornasier, S. et al.; Visible and near infrared spectroscopic investigation of E-type asteroids, including 2867 Šteins, a target of the Rosetta mission, Icarus, Vol. 196, No. 1, p. 119-134
    6. "MPEC 2020-V139 : (317) Roxane I = Olympias". Minor Planet Electronic Circular. Minor Planet Center. 14 November 2020. Retrieved 14 November 2020.
    7. Wm. Robert Johnson, "(317) Roxane and S/2009 (317) 1, Johnston's Archive. 11 Dec 2009. Accessed 1 Jan 2012.