53 King Street

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53 King Street
Lloyds Bank Manchester.jpg
Alternative names Lloyds TSB Building
General information
Architectural style Edwardian Baroque
Address 53 King Street
Town or city Manchester
Country United Kingdom
Completed 1915
Client Lloyds Bank
Design and construction
Architect Charles Heathcote

53 King Street is an Edwardian Baroque bank on King Street in Manchester, England. Designed by architect Charles Heathcote, it opened in 1913 and was granted Grade II listed building status in 1974. [1] It used to house a branch of Lloyds TSB. In 2009, the building was sold for £6 million. [2] The building stands on the site of the old Manchester Town Hall.

Edwardian Baroque architecture Neo-Baroque architectural style of many public buildings built in the British Empire during the Edwardian era

Edwardian Baroque is the Neo-Baroque architectural style of many public buildings built in the British Empire during the Edwardian era (1901–1910).

King Street, Manchester road in Manchester city center, England

King Street is one of the most important thoroughfares of Manchester city centre, England. Formerly the centre of the north-west banking industry it has become progressively dominated by expensive shops.

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous metropolitan area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Architecture

The bank, designed in an elaborate Baroque style, is built on an L-shaped site with seven bays on King Street and eight bays facing Cross Street and between them a chamfered corner. It is constructed of Portland stone on a granite plinth and has a basement with four storeys above and double attics. [1]

Baroque architecture building style of the Baroque era

Baroque architecture is the building style of the Baroque era, begun in late 16th-century Italy, that took the Roman vocabulary of Renaissance architecture and used it in a new rhetorical and theatrical fashion, often to express the triumph of the Catholic Church. It was characterized ..by new explorations of form, light and shadow, and dramatic intensity. Common features of Baroque architecture included gigantism of proportions; a large open central space where everyone could see the altar; twisting columns, theatrical effects, including light coming from a cupola above; dramatic interior effects created with bronze and gilding; clusters of sculpted angels and other figures high overhead; and an extensive use of trompe-l'oeil, also called "quadratura," with painted architectural details and figures on the walls and ceiling, to increase the dramatic and theatrical effect.

Bay (architecture) space defined by the vertical piers, in a building

In architecture, a bay is the space between architectural elements, or a recess or compartment. Bay comes from Old French baee, meaning an opening or hole.

Chamfer flat transitional edge between two faces of a manufactured object

A chamfer is a transitional edge between two faces of an object. A form of bevel, it is created at a 45° angle to two adjoining right-angled faces. A lark's tongue is a chamfer which ends short of a piece in a gradual upward curve, leaving the balance as a right angle. Chamfers may be formed in either inside or outside adjoining faces of an object or room. They are also used to "ease" otherwise sharp edges, both for safety and to prevent damage to them.

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References

  1. 1 2 Historic England. "Lloyds Bank (1291610)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 28 September 2012.
  2. Moore, Cheryl (2 April 2009). "Lloyds TSB site is sold". Manchester Evening News. Retrieved 2012-09-10.

Coordinates: 53°28′53″N2°14′39″W / 53.48125°N 2.24430°W / 53.48125; -2.24430

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.